The Holy Eucharist distinguishes Christianity from other religions.  The Eucharist represents the physical presence of Jesus Christ.  For Roman Catholics, the Eucharist is the physical presence of Jesus Christ.  At Our Lady of Mount Carmel Catholic Church, in Newport News, Virginia, before daily Mass, some of the Faithful spend their time in the chapel.  The chapel is where the Eucharist is reserved.  The chapel is next door to where Mass is celebrated.

 

Bringing people to the Eucharistic presence in the context of Sacred Scripture might build bridges to many co-religionists.  The special presence of God is both in the Words of Sacred Scripture and at the rest of Mass.  I wonder what options there may be for the Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults (RICA) to incorporate such an approach.[1]  That is the approach in Personal Notes.

 

 

Readings

First Reading:                   Deuteronomy 8:2-3, 14b-16a

Responsorial Psalm:          Psalm 147:12-13, 14-15, 19-20 (12)

Second Reading:               1 Corinthians 10:16-17

Alleluia:                             John 6:51

Gospel:                             John 6:51-58

 

Annotated Bibliography

Musings above the solid line draw from material below.  Those uninterested in scholarly and tangential details should stop reading here.  If they do, however, they may miss some interesting details.

 

Deuteronomy 8:2-3, 14b-16a

Deuteronomy 8:3

John Calvin (1509-1564), “Commentary on Daniel”[2]

Calvin asserts that the medical profession claims pulse is injurious, but was what Daniel and his fellow Jews ate in Babylon.  Pulse is the edible seeds of various leguminous crops (as peas and beans). [3]  Either the medical profession or Calvin was wrong about the injurious nature of peas and beans.  The point Calvin is making is not that, however.  Calvin’s point is that food for the body is nothing compared with food for the soul, the holy Word of God.  Calvin does not seem as focused on the Holy Eucharist.

 

Deuteronomy 8:3

Philipp Melanchthon (1497-1560), “Notes on Paul’s Letter to the Colossians”[4]

Melanchthon insists that as bad as things are on earth and in nature, God, who created nature, is still in charge.  In a footnote, the editors of Colossians find a relationship to Deuteronomy 8:3 that I do not see.  Eucharistic presence solves many of the mysteries of evil in this world.

 

Deut 8:14-18

Mark D. Matthews, “The Function of Imputed Speech in the Apocalypse of John”[5]

Matthews argues that Do not forget . . . is about thinking one can rely on oneself, without God.

 

Psalm 147:12-13, 14-15, 19-20 (12)

 

1 Corinthians 10:16-17

1 Cor 10:16-17

Thomas P. Rausch, S.J., “Occasional Eucharistic Hospitality:  Revisiting the Question”[6]

Rausch argues from we, though many, are one body, for we all partake of the one loaf that there is a sacramental dimension to Christian unity.

 


 

1 Corinthians 16:17[7]

Mary Collins and Edward Foley, “Mystagogy:  Discerning the Mystery of Faith”

At Mass, the mystery of our Faith resides in the new communion of the one loaf that explains the meaning of human history.

 

Patrick Regan, “Theology of the Latin Text and Rite”

Eucharistic Prayer I is about mediation through the angels and Jesus Christ to God, unlike this verse, we all partake in the one loaf.  The Missal is in tension with itself.

 

1 Corinthians 10:16[8]

Richard E. McCarron, “Theology of the Latin Text and Rite”

The cup of blessing in Eucharistic Prayer II, recalls the same phrase in 1 Corinthians 10:16.

 

Anscar J. Chupungco, “The ICEL2010 Translation”

Chupungco makes the same point as McCarron above.

 

1 Corinthians 10:16

Calvin, “Commentary on Ezekiel”[9]

Calvin says the papists say that in the absence of mortal sin the sacraments are effective.  Calvin says that is wrong.  To be effective, the sacraments also need faith.  Calvin draws attention to Eucharistic participation in the body and blood of Christ.  While Calvin does not get into it, in this passage, the doctrine concerns priestly ordination.  The Catholic Church teaches that consecrating bread and wine into the body and blood of Jesus Christ does not depend on the sanctity of the priest, but on his ordination.  I am not sure that Calvin has the papists right in this instance.

 


 

1 Corinthians 10:17[10]

John Baldovin, “History of the Latin Text and Rite”

The bread that we break refers to both the Eucharistic and the Passion and Death of Jesus Christ.

 

David Power, “Theology of the Latin Text and Rite”

There is a problem between The General Instruction of the Roman Missal (GRIM) and the symbolism involved with the breaking of the bread.  GRIM approves consecrating many hosts at the same time, whereas 1 Corinthians 10:17 refers to one loaf, which would not permit many hosts at the same time.  Personal Notes is not resolving this problem.

 

John 6:51

John 6:56

Funerals uses this reading in two places.[11]

 

John 6:51-58

John 6:51

Joseph A. Bracken, S.J., “The Challenge of Self-giving Love”[12]

Bracken argues from I am the living bread to assert that the aim of personal transcendence rests in the well-being of the other, rather than in the well-being of the self.  Bracken makes an analogy with a pregnant woman.  Prayer and contemplation can also serve the well-being of the other.

 


 

John 6:51[13]

Michael Witczak, “History of the Latin Text and Rite”

At Mass, intercessions for the living are not only about individuals, but also about all of humanity, drawing from for the life of the world.

 

Anscar J. Chupungco, “Excursus on the Eucharistic Prayers for Reconciliation”

At the Consecration, the illiterate 2011 Missal mimics whoever eats this bread, with whoever eats of it.

 

John 6:51

Philip W. Comfort, New Testament Text and Translation Commentary:  Commentary on the variant readings of the ancient New Testament manuscripts and how they relate to the major English translations [14]

Comfort has no comment on John 6:51.

 

John 6:51

 Daniel B. Wallace, With Scripture, Subject, and Greek Word Indexes: Greek Grammar:  Beyond the Basics: An Exegetical Syntax of the New Testament[15]

What the Lectionary translates as whoever eats this bread will live forever, Wallace translates if anyone eats from this bread, he will live forever.  The difference is between needing and not needing the state of grace before receiving Communion.  The difference in translation is pertinent to the Rausch article above.

 


 

John 6:53, 56-57

Hans Schlaffer (c. 1490-1528) and Leonhard Frick (d 1528), “Kunstbuch:  A Simple Prayer”[16]

Schlaffer and Frick are early enough in the Revolt to take the Church for granted.  They take unless you eat the flesh of the Son of Man . . .  for granted,  with no need for the institutional Church to carry on the sacraments.

 

John 6:53

Francis J. Moloney, S.D.B., “Constructing Jesus and the Son of Man”[17]

Moloney refers to the Son of man as part of his argument that Jesus uses Son of man to describe his vocation and that of his followers.

 

John 6:57

Jacobus Arminius (1559-1609), ”Disputation on the Person of the Father and the Son”[18]

Without using the word Trinity or mentioning the Holy Spirit, Arminius takes his focus from, I have life because of the Father.  Through the Eucharist, the Faithful also have life because of the father.

 

For more on sources see the Appendix file.  A complete set of Personal Notes, dating from the Fifteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time, July 14, 2002 to the present, is on the web site at www.western-civilization.com/CBQ/Personal%20Notes. 

 

 

 

The Responsorial Antiphon for this Sunday is Praise the Lord, Jerusalem (Psalm 147:12).[19]  The Eucharist merits praise, indeed.

 

In the gobbledygook prayer at Sunday Mass immediately following the forgiveness of sins, the Faithful hearing the 2011 Roman Missal can listen for “this wonderful Sacrament.”[20]

 

This is a call for grace that some Black Baptists bring to mind with Then he answered and spake unto me, saying, This is the word of the LORD unto Zerubbabel, saying, Not by might, nor by power, but by my spirit, saith the LORD of hosts (Zechariah 4:6).[21]  The Spirit of God is present on both Sacred Scripture and the Holy Eucharist.

 

 



 

[2] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  Old Testament XII: Ezekiel, Daniel, (ed.) Carl L. Beckwith (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic, An Imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2012) 247.

 

[4] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament XI:  Philippians, Colossians, Graham Tomlin (ed.) in collaboration with Gregory B. Graybill, general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2013) 182.

 

[5] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 74, No. 2 (April 2012) 321.

 

[6] Theological Studies, Vol. 74, No. 2 (June 2013) 406, 416.

 

[7] in A Commentary on the Order of Mass of The Roman Missal:  A New English Translation:  Developed under the Auspices of the Catholic Academy of Liturgy, Edward Foley (ed.) (Collegeville, Minnesota:  Liturgical Press, 2011) 76, 274.

 

[8] in A Commentary on the Order of Mass of The Roman Missal:  A New English Translation:  Developed under the Auspices of the Catholic Academy of Liturgy, Edward Foley (ed.) (Collegeville, Minnesota:  Liturgical Press, 2011) 562, 573.

 

[9] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  Old Testament XII: Ezekiel, Daniel, (ed.) Carl L. Beckwith (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic, An Imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2012) 114.

 

[10] in A Commentary on the Order of Mass of The Roman Missal:  A New English Translation:  Developed under the Auspices of the Catholic Academy of Liturgy, Edward Foley (ed.) (Collegeville, Minnesota:  Liturgical Press, 2011) 599, 605.

 

[11] International Commission on English in the Liturgy: A Joint Commission of Catholic Bishops’ Conferences, The Roman Ritual: Revised by Decree of the Second Vatican Ecumenical Council and published by Authority of Pope Paul IV: Order of Christian Funerals: Including Appendix 2: Cremation: Approved for use in the Dioceses of the United States of America by the National Conference of Catholic Bishops and Confirmed by the Apostolic See (New Jersey: Catholic Book Publishing Co., 1998) 241, 259.

 

[12] Theological Studies, Vol. 74, No. 4 (December 2013) 858.

 

[13] in A Commentary on the Order of Mass of The Roman Missal:  A New English Translation:  Developed under the Auspices of the Catholic Academy of Liturgy, Edward Foley (ed.) (Collegeville, Minnesota:  Liturgical Press, 2011) 360, 479.

 

[14] Carol Stream, Illinois:  Tyndale House Publishers, Inc., 2008, 278.

 

[15] Grand Rapids: Michigan: Zondervan, 1996, 347.

 

[16] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament VI:  Acts, Esther Chung-Kim and Todd R. Hains (eds.), general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2014) 199.

 

[17] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 75, No. 4 (October 2013) 725.

 

[18] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament XI:  Philippians, Colossians, Graham Tomlin (ed.) in collaboration with Gregory B. Graybill, general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2013) 46.

 

[19] National Conference of Catholic Bishops, The Roman Missal Restored by Decree of the Second Ecumenical Council of the Vatican and Promulgated by Authority of Pope Paul VI: Lectionary for Mass:  For Use in the Dioceses of the United States of America:  Second Typical Edition:  Volume I:  Sundays, Solemnities, Feasts of the Lord and the Saints (Collegeville, Minnesota:  The Liturgical Press, 1988) 1016.  Personal Notes refers to this book as the Lectionary.

 

[20] n.a., The Roman Missal:  Renewed by Decree of the Most Holy Second Ecumenical Council of the Vatican, Promulgated by Authority of Pope Paul VI and Revised at the Direction of Pope John Paul II:  English Translation According to the Third Typical Edition:  For Use in the Dioceses of the United States of America:  Approved by the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops and Confirmed by the Apostolic See (Washington, DC, United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, 2011) 499.  Personal Notes refers to this book as the Missal.

 

[21] UMI Annual Sunday School Lesson Commentary:  Precepts for Living ®: 2013-2014:  International Sunday School Lessons:  Volume 165:  UMI (Urban Ministries, Inc.), a. Okechuku Ogbonnaya, Ph.D., (ed.) (Chicago, IL  60643: UMI (Urban Ministries, Inc.), 2013) 487-489.