The United States Conference of Catholic Bishops seems to take the same approach to Donald Trump that the German hierarchy took toward Adolph Hitler.  Before he was elected, Hitler used gentler language toward Jews than Trump toward Mexicans and Muslims.  I am aghast, today, October 12, that Fox News used a non-descript priest and Raymond Arroyo to speak for all Catholics in the context of Republicans making private emails from the Clinton campaign available for use in the Trump campaign.

 

Concentrating on one issue politics, such as abortion, distorts the political landscape.  Hitler concentrated on the ravages of the Great Depression on the poor, eventually blaming Jews, resulting in the Jewish Holocaust.  Let this Sunday be about getting over one-issue addiction to pluralistic politics.  The God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob;  . . .  he is not God of the dead, but of the living, for to him all are alive (Luke 20:37-38).  Freedom from addiction of any kind belongs to the God of the living.

 

 

Readings

First Reading                     2 Maccabees 7:1-2, 9-14

Responsorial Psalm:          Psalm 17:1, 5-6, 8, 15 (15b)

Second Reading:               2 Thessalonians 2:16—3:5

Alleluia:                             Revelation 1:5a, 6b

Gospel:                             Luke 20:27-38

 

Annotated Bibliography

Musings above the solid line draw from material below.  Those disinterested in scholarly and tangential details should stop reading here.  If they do, however, they may miss some interesting prayer-provoking details.

 

 

2 Maccabees 7:1-2, 9-14

2 Macc 7:1-2

Brian J. Tabb, “Is the Lucan Jesus a `Martyr’?  A Critical Assessment of a Scholarly Consensus”[1]

 

 

 

 

2 Macc 7:9, 11, 14

Gerry Wheaton, “The Festival of Hanukkah in 2 Maccabees:  Its Meaning and Function”[2]

 

 

Psalm 17:1, 5-6, 8, 15 (15b)

Psalm 17:1, 5-6, 8, 15[3]

Nikolaus Selnecker (1530-1592)

John Calvin (1509-1564)

Johannes Bugenhagen (1485-1558)

Moïse Amyraut (1596-1664)

Calvin

Calvin

Weller von Molsdorf (1499-1572)

Rudolf Gwalther (1519-1586)

Selnecker

Martin Luther (1483-1546)

Wolfgang Musculus (1497-1563)

Selnecker*

Calvin

Selnecker

Calvin

Selnecker

Calvin

 

 

Psalm 17:10-15[4]

Selnecker

The footnote refers back to Selnecker on page 130*.

 

 

2 Thessalonians 2:16—3:5

 

 

Revelation 1:5a, 6b

 

 

Luke 20:27-38

Luke 20:25-47

Timothy W. Reardon, “Cleansing through Almsgiving in Luke-Acts:  Purity, Cornelius, and the Translation of Acts 15:9”[5]

 

 

Luke 20:27-38[6]

Martin Bucer (1491-1551)

Philipp Melanchthon (1497-1560)

Calvin

Bucer

 

 

Luke 20:27-33

Barbara E. Reid, O.P., “The Gospel of Luke:  Friend or Foe of Women Proclaimers of the Word?”[7]

 

 

Luke 20:27

Matthew Thiessen, “A Buried Pentateuchal Allusion to the Resurrection in Mark 12:25”[8]

 

 

Luke 20:35-38

In its section on “Prayers after Death, Funerals uses Luke 20:35-38 about the resurrection.[9]

 

 

Luke 20:37

Daniel B. Wallace, With Scripture, Subject, and Greek Word Indexes: Greek Grammar:  Beyond the Basics: An Exegetical Syntax of the New Testament[10]

 

 

In its section on “Prayers after Death, Funerals uses Luke 20:35-38 about the resurrection.[11]

 

 

For more on sources see the Appendix file.  A complete set of Personal Notes, dating from the Fifteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time, July 14, 2002 to the present, is on the web site at www.western-civilization.com/CBQ/Personal%20Notes. 

 

 

 

The Responsorial Antiphon for this Sunday is Lord, when your glory appears, my joy will be full (Psalm 17:15b).[12]

 

In the gobbledygook prayer at Sunday Mass immediately following the forgiveness of sins, the Faithful hearing the 2011 Roman Missal can listen for “pursue in freedom of heart the things that are yours.”[13]  For a more thorough examination of the illiterate 2011 Roman Missal, go to 1610 Missal:  Thirty-fourth Sunday in Ordinary Time 121125.pdf/htm at http://www.western-civilization.com/CBQ/Personal%20Notes/Personal%20Notes.htm.

 

This is a call for grace that some Black Baptists bring to mind with And God shall wipe away all tears from thjeir eyes; and there shall be no more death, neither sorrow, nor crying, neither shall there be any more pain:  for the former things are passed away (Revelation 21:4).[14] 

 

Addenda

 

 

Personal Notes has been wary of Raymond Arroyo, host of “the World Over, on the Eternal Word Television Network, EWTN, attacking Pope Francis.  Personal Notes has watched for various Papal policies, like anything possibly construed as positive for Democrats. 

 

I have already read everything cited in the footnotes.  Because I am under stress, I am not re-reading anything at this time. 

 

I intend to begin catching up on material postponed while recovering from the transition of ourselves from Virginia to Ohio and Marty into the next life.  Since the first of the year, Bette has suffered a shattered hip, a stroke, and a badly infected gall bladder.  I am recovering from a transurethral resection of the prostate (turp).  If I ever get three months out, again, I then intend to reevaluate the amount of energy placed into Personal Notes each week.

 

 



[1] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 77, No. 2 (April 2015) 284, 285, 287.

 

[2] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 74, No. 2 (April 2012), 258.

 

[3] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  Old Testament VII:  Psalms 1—72, Timothy George (ed.), general editor, Scot M. Manetsch, Associate General editor, Herman J. Selderhuis (ed.), (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2015, ISBN 978 0 8308-2957-6 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 15) 127-131.

 

[4] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  Old Testament VII:  Psalms 1—72, Timothy George (ed.), general editor, Scot M. Manetsch, Associate General editor, Herman J. Selderhuis (ed.), (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2015, ISBN 978 0 8308-2957-6 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 15) 281, fn. 6.

 

[5] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 78, No. 3 (July 2016) 479.

 

[6] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament III:  Luke, Beth Kreitzer (ed.), general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2015:  ISBN 978-0-8308-2014 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 15) 396-397.

 

[7] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 78, No. 1 (January 2016) 17.

 

[8] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 76, No. 2 (April 2014), 273.

 

[9] N.a., International Commission on English in the Liturgy: A Joint Commission of Catholic Bishops’ Conferences, The Roman Ritual: Revised by Decree of the Second Vatican Ecumenical Council and published by Authority of Pope Paul IV: Order of Christian Funerals: Including Appendix 2: Cremation: Approved for use in the Dioceses of the United States of America by the National Conference of Catholic Bishops and Confirmed by the Apostolic See (New Jersey: Catholic Book Publishing Co., 1998) 52.

 

[10] Grand Rapids: Michigan: Zondervan, 1996,

 

[11] N.a., International Commission on English in the Liturgy: A Joint Commission of Catholic Bishops’ Conferences, The Roman Ritual: Revised by Decree of the Second Vatican Ecumenical Council and published by Authority of Pope Paul IV: Order of Christian Funerals: Including Appendix 2: Cremation: Approved for use in the Dioceses of the United States of America by the National Conference of Catholic Bishops and Confirmed by the Apostolic See (New Jersey: Catholic Book Publishing Co., 1998) 52.

 

[12] National Conference of Catholic Bishops, The Roman Missal Restored by Decree of the Second Ecumenical Council of the Vatican and Promulgated by Authority of Pope Paul VI: Lectionary for Mass:  For Use in the Dioceses of the United States of America:  Second Typical Edition:  Volume I:  Sundays, Solemnities, Feasts of the Lord and the Saints (Collegeville, Minnesota:  The Liturgical Press, 1988) 953.  Personal Notes refers to this book as the Lectionary.

 

[13] n.a., The Roman Missal:  Renewed by Decree of the Most Holy Second Ecumenical Council of the Vatican, Promulgated by Authority of Pope Paul VI and Revised at the Direction of Pope John Paul II:  English Translation According to the Third Typical Edition:  For Use in the Dioceses of the United States of America:  Approved by the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops and Confirmed by the Apostolic See (Washington, DC, United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, 2011) 492.  Personal Notes refers to this book as the Missal.

 

[14] UMI Annual Sunday School Lesson Commentary:  Precepts for Living ®: 2016-2017:  International Sunday School Lessons:  Volume 19:  UMI (Urban Ministries, Inc.), A. Okechuku Ogbonnaya, Ph.D., (ed.) (Chicago, IL  60643: UMI (Urban Ministries, Inc.), 2016) 101-102.