Again, did not find any scholarly research to embellish the readings.  Below I take a look at what Catholics in the Reformation series have to say.  The Church has always been in trouble of one sort or another.  Listening to Raymond Arroyo criticize the United States bishops yesterday is cause for prayer.

First the bishops teach that it is gravely sinful to use artificial means of birth control.  Second they teach it is also gravely sinful to take any human life before birth, at any point of development.  Finally, the bishops are keeping a discrete silence over the fact that Donald Trump is in the pro-life camp and Hillary Clinton is in the pro-choice camp. 

The night before last, last night Bette and I sent a letter to the editor of the Elyria Chronicle, “Trump is demonstrating the emotional maturity of a Second or Third Grader.  His finger on the nuclear button is frightening,” meaning that the difference between pro-life and pro-choice in this instance is inconsequential.  The Lord hears the cry of the poor (Psalm 34:7a),[1] especially those who lack the resources for either artificial means of birth control or early term abortions in this Presidential season.

 

 

Readings

First Reading                     Sirach 35:12-14, 16-18

Responsorial Psalm:          Psalm 34:2-3, 17-18, 19, 23 (7a)

Second Reading:               2 Timothy 4:6-8, 16-18

Alleluia:                             2 Corinthians 5:19

Gospel:                             Luke 18:9-14

 

Annotated Bibliography

Musings above the solid line draw from material below.  Those disinterested in scholarly and tangential details should stop reading here.  If they do, however, they may miss some interesting prayer-provoking details.

 

Sirach 35:12-14, 16-18


 

Sirach 35:17

Johann Spangenberg (1484-1550)[2]

 

 

Psalm 34:2-3, 17-18, 19, 23 (7a)

Care for the Sick uses Psalm 34, Part III: Readings, Responses, and Verses from Sacred Scripture: Responsorial Psalms E God is the salvation of those who trust in him, page 286 and Mass for Viaticum: Responsorial Psalms B, page 324.[3]

 

 

Psalm 34:1-4

Johann Baumgart (1514-1578)[4]

 

 


 

Psalm 34:2-3, 17-19, 23[5]

Nikolaus Selnecker (1530-1592)

Johannes Bugenhagen (1485-1558)

= Catholic

Desiderius Erasmus (1466-1536)

You may find many who fast, who give to the poor, who pray frequently, who go about in lowly attire, but very few who in the midst of a constant stream of adversities give thanks to God, who do not plot revenge, who even do not return evil for evil.  These are the infallible signs by which you may recognize a mind that is truly pious and Christian.

Selnecker

David Dickson (1583?-1663)

John Calvin (1509-1564)

Selnecker

Erasmus

 . . . go down into yourself and consider how you are nothing, how lost and how wretched you are; then, turning your eyes to God, think how utterly good, utterly wise and utterly powerful he is; think over what he has done for you, how mercifully he sought you out, how kindly he gave to you; and finally compare his goodness with our wickedness.

Selnecker

Hieronymus Weller von Molsdorf (1499-1572)

Erasmus

In the context of martyrdom, Erasmus asks, “The tortured gives thanks while the torturer rages:  which of the two is vanquished?”

Calvin

Selnecker

Dickson

Martin Luther (1483-1546)

Calvin

Cardinal Cajetan (1469-1534)

“Since in human terms, our ears and eyes must be nearby in order to help—for the more distant the less we hear and see to offer assistance—therefore the prophet includes a reference to God’s nearness with regard to the righteous.”

Calvin

Erasmus

Erasmus comments on the spiritual life, “We approach with faith, and when we receive the firstfruits of the Spirit, like a pledge, we taste; when we enjoy his presence as we think of his extraordinary love for us and hope that we may experience the eternal bliss of gazing on his face, we see.”

 

Erasmus

 . . . to love another’s righteousness and to hate one’s own lack of it is already a step on the road to righteousness

 

2 Timothy 4:6-8, 16-18

2 Timothy 4:6-8

Nathan Eubank, “Storing Up Treasure with God in the Heavens:  Celestial Investments in Matthew 6:121”[6]

 

 

2 Timothy 4:6-8

David R. Bauer, review of Georg Rubel, Paulus und Rom:  Historische, rezeptionsgeschichtliche und  archäologische Aspekte zum letzten Lebensabschnitt des  Völkerapostels[7]

Bauer reports that Rubel is “reflecting consensus opinion.” 

Rubel finds 2 Tim 4:6-8 less historically reliable, since in this farewell epistle’ the writer presents Paul as an ideal Christian minister in order to serve as an example to his readers.  Yet, insofar as this account is based on indications from Paul’s epistles, it does contain some historically accurate information reflecting Paul’s approaching martyrdom.

 

I am already being poured out like a libation, and the time of my departure is at hand.  I have competed well; I have finished the race; I have kept the faith.  From now on the crown of righteousness awaits me, which the Lord. The just judge will award to me on that day, and not only to me, but to all who have longed for his appearance.

 


 

2 Timothy 4:7-8[8]

Martin Bucer (1491-1551)

 

Philipp Melanchthon (1497-1560)

 

Luther

 

 

2 Tim 4:9-18

Philip H. Towner, review of Michel Gourgues, Les deux lettres à Timothée, La letter ‘a Tite[9]

 

 

2 Corinthians 5:19

 

 

Luke 18:9-14

The Church uses this gospel as an option in Pastoral Care of the Sick.[10]

 

 


 

Luke 18:9-14[11]

John Boys (1571-1625)

Kaspar von Schwenckfeld (1489-1561)

Thomas Becon (1511/1512-1567)

The English Annotations (1645, 1651, 1657)

Luther

Caspar Huberinus (1500-1553)

Richard Taverner (1505-1575)

Johannes Brenz (1499-1570)

 

Luke 18:9-14

Bugenhagen[12]

 

 

Luke 18:9-14

Beth Kreitzer (2015 InterVarsity Press editor)[13]

 

 

Luke 18:9-14

Paul Lakeland, Engaging Theology:  Catholic Perspectives:  Church:  Living Communion[14]

 

 

Luke 18:10-14

St. Thérèse of Lisieux, The Story of a Soul:  A New Translation [15]

 

 

Luke 18:11-12

Selnecker[16]

 

 

Luke 18:11

The English Annotations[17]

 

 

Luke 18:11

Frank J. Matera, The Sermon on the Mount:  The Perfect Measure of the Christian Life[18]

 

 

Luke 18:13

Rudolf Gwalther (1519-1586)[19]

 

 

Luke 18:13

Daniel B. Wallace, With Scripture, Subject, and Greek Word Indexes: Greek Grammar:  Beyond the Basics: An Exegetical Syntax of the New Testament[20]

 

 

For more on sources see the Appendix file.  A complete set of Personal Notes, dating from the Fifteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time, July 14, 2002 to the present, is on the web site at www.western-civilization.com/CBQ/Personal%20Notes. 

 

 

 

The Responsorial Antiphon for this Sunday is The Lord hears the cry of the poor (Psalm 34:7a).[21]

 

In the gobbledygook prayer at Sunday Mass immediately following the forgiveness of sins, the Faithful hearing the 2011 Roman Missal can listen for “increase our faith, hope and charity.[22]  For a more thorough examination of the illiterate 2011 Roman Missal, go to 1610 Missal:  Thirty-fourth Sunday in Ordinary Time 121125.pdf/htm at http://www.western-civilization.com/CBQ/Personal%20Notes/Personal%20Notes.htm.

 

This is a call for grace that some Black Baptists bring to mind with But this man, because he continueth ever, hath an unchangeable priesthood (Hebrews 7:24).[23] 

 

Addenda

 

 

 

Personal Notes has been wary of Raymond Arroyo, host of “the World Over, on the Eternal Word Television Network, EWTN, attacking Pope Francis.  Personal Notes has watched for various Papal policies, like anything possibly construed as positive for Democrats, that Arroyo might systematically attack.  Nothing seemed to fall into place until a better realization of what the “Papal Posse,” with Robert Royal, a journalist, and Father Gerald Murray, a canon lawyer, means.  The Posse is out to find and attack Pope Francis, and this on a Catholic network.  This fell into place at the program Thursday, June 25, 2016.  EWTN represents the stand of the United States Catholic Conference of Bishops (USCCB).

 

I have already read every article cited in the Catholic Biblical Quarterly.  At this stage I only read unread book reviews there.  Traditionally Theological Studies articles have been more helpful to my prayer life, but, if I have already read the article, I will cite it without annotation.  In a similar way, I present unread sections in Reformation Commentary on Scripture.

 

 

I intend to begin catching up on material postponed while recovering from the transition of ourselves from Virginia to Ohio and Marty into the next life.  If I ever get three months out, again, I then intend to reevaluate the amount of energy placed into Personal Notes each week.

 

 



[1] National Conference of Catholic Bishops, The Roman Missal Restored by Decree of the Second Ecumenical Council of the Vatican and Promulgated by Authority of Pope Paul VI: Lectionary for Mass:  For Use in the Dioceses of the United States of America:  Second Typical Edition:  Volume I:  Sundays, Solemnities, Feasts of the Lord and the Saints (Collegeville, Minnesota:  The Liturgical Press, 1988) 20.  Personal Notes refers to this book as the Lectionary.

 

[2] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament III:  Luke, Beth Kreitzer (ed.), general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2015:  ISBN 978-0-8308-2014 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 15) 235, fn. 12.

 

[3] International Commission on English in the Liturgy: A Joint Commission of Catholic Bishops’ Conferences, The Roman Ritual: Revised by Decree of the Second Vatican Ecumenical Council and Published by Authority of Pope Paul VI: Pastoral Care of the Sick: Rites of Anointing and Viaticum: Approved for Use in the Dioceses of the United States of America by the National Conference of Catholic Bishops and Confirmed by the Apostolic See (New York: Catholic Book Publishing Co., 1983) 296.

 

[4] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament III:  Luke, Beth Kreitzer (ed.), general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2015:  ISBN 978-0-8308-2014 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 15) 121.

 

[5] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  Old Testament VII:  Psalms 1—72, Timothy George (ed.), general editor, Scot M. Manetsch, Associate General editor, Herman J. Selderhuis (ed.), (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2015, ISBN 978 0 8308-2957-6 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 15) 269-272, 276-278

 

[6] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 76, No. 1 (January 2014) 84.

 

[7] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 78, No. 1 (January 2016) 173.

 

[8] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament III:  Luke, Beth Kreitzer (ed.), general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2015:  ISBN 978-0-8308-2014 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 15) 60, fn. 8; 273, fn. 5; 413, fn. 32.

 

[9] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 75, No. 2 (April 2013) 361.

 

[10] “Part III: Readings, Responses, and Verses from Sacred Scripture,” Gospels, P, The Roman Ritual: Revised by Decree of the Second Vatican Ecumenical Council and Published by Authority of Pope Paul VI: Pastoral Care of the Sick: Rites of Anointing and Viaticum: Approved for use in the dioceses of the United States of America by the National Conference of Catholic Bishops and confirmed by the Apostolic See: Prepared by International Commission on English in the Liturgy: a Joint Commission of Catholic Bishops’ Conferences (New York: Catholic Book Publishing Co. 1983)

[11] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament III:  Luke, Beth Kreitzer (ed.), general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2015:  ISBN 978-0-8308-2014 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 15) 348-351.

 

[12] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  Old Testament V:  1-2 Samuel, 1-2 Kings, 1-2 Chronicles, Timothy George (ed.), general editor, Scot M. Manetsch, Associate General editor, Derek Cooper and Martin J. Lohrmann (ed.), (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2016, ISBN 978 0 8308-29552 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 16) 5, fn. 2.

 

[13] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament III:  Luke, Beth Kreitzer (ed.), general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2015:  ISBN 978-0-8308-2014 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 15) xlix.

 

[14] Collegeville, Minnesota:  Liturgical Press, A Michael Glazier Book, 2009, 120.

 

[15] Robert J. Edmonson, CJ, (translator) (Brewster, Massachusetts: Paraclete Press, 2006) 236, 296.

 

[16] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament III:  Luke, Beth Kreitzer (ed.), general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2015:  ISBN 978-0-8308-2014 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 15) 64, fn. 4.

 

[17] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament III:  Luke, Beth Kreitzer (ed.), general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2015:  ISBN 978-0-8308-2014 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 15) 38, fn. 7.

 

[18] Collegeville, Minnesota:  Liturgical Press, 2013, 74.

 

[19] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament III:  Luke, Beth Kreitzer (ed.), general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2015:  ISBN 978-0-8308-2014 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 15) 252, fn. 16.

 

[20] Grand Rapids: Michigan: Zondervan, 1996, 208, 223, 441

 

[21] National Conference of Catholic Bishops, The Roman Missal Restored by Decree of the Second Ecumenical Council of the Vatican and Promulgated by Authority of Pope Paul VI: Lectionary for Mass:  For Use in the Dioceses of the United States of America:  Second Typical Edition:  Volume I:  Sundays, Solemnities, Feasts of the Lord and the Saints (Collegeville, Minnesota:  The Liturgical Press, 1988) 20.  Personal Notes refers to this book as the Lectionary.

 

[22] n.a., The Roman Missal:  Renewed by Decree of the Most Holy Second Ecumenical Council of the Vatican, Promulgated by Authority of Pope Paul VI and Revised at the Direction of Pope John Paul II:  English Translation According to the Third Typical Edition:  For Use in the Dioceses of the United States of America:  Approved by the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops and Confirmed by the Apostolic See (Washington, DC, United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, 2011) 490.  Personal Notes refers to this book as the Missal.

 

[23] UMI Annual Sunday School Lesson Commentary:  Precepts for Living ®: 2016-2017:  International Sunday School Lessons:  Volume 19:  UMI (Urban Ministries, Inc.), A. Okechuku Ogbonnaya, Ph.D., (ed.) (Chicago, IL  60643: UMI (Urban Ministries, Inc.), 2016) 12-13