Come, let us bow down in worship; let us kneel before the LORD who made us.  For he is our God, and we are the people he shepherds, the flock he guides (Psalm 95:6-7).  Gabriel Torretta, O.P., writes the following about these verses:  “ . . . grace sets Christians free to laugh at the wicked’s self-delusions.”  That is what Jesus was doing on the Cross when he said, “My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?”

Torretta examines Saint Augustine of Hippo, looking for humor.  Augustine had and approved humor, even during his sermons.  Augustine regarded humor as a human faculty.

Raymond Arroyo, on the Eternal Word Television Network, will show sarcasm, but not humor.  On Thursday, September 15, Arroyo interviewed the comic, Jerry Lewis, focusing on the fact that Lewis is ninety years old and is now taking life seriously.  The new movie, “Max Rose” is about the life of Lewis.  I do not think of Arroyo or the Roman Catholic Church as having any significant sense of humor.  Up until this point, I had not related a dour face with holiness, but I can see such seriousness associated with sanctity, especially when related to such problems as artificial means of birth control, abortion, female ordination and other sexually repressive Church policies.

 

Bettye Collier-Thomas, Jesus, Jobs, and Justice:  African American Women and Religion (Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 2010) offers new meaning to misogyny.  Collier-Thomas shows how Black women dealt with sexism as they maintained their membership in institutional churches, all the while keeping an eye on justice.  As the Responsorial verse for this Sunday puts it, If today you hear his voice, harden not your hearts (Ps 95:8).[1]

 

 

Readings

First Reading:                    Habakkuk 1:2-3, 2:3-4

Responsorial Psalm:          Psalm 95:1-2, 6-7, 8-9 (8)

Second Reading:               2 Timothy 1:6-8, 13-14

Alleluia:                             1 Peter 1:25

Gospel:                             Luke 17:5-10

 

Annotated Bibliography

Musings above the solid line draw from material below.  Those disinterested in scholarly and tangential details should stop reading here.  If they do, however, they may miss some interesting prayer-provoking details.

 

 

Habakkuk 1:2-3, 2:3-4

Habakkuk 2:3

Philipp Melanchthon (1497-1560)[2]

 

 

Hab 2:3

Nicholas R. Werse, “Second Temple Jewish Literary Traditions in 2 Peter”[3]

 

 

Hab 2:4b

Robert L. Foster, “The Justice of the Gentiles:  Revisiting the Purpose of Romans”[4]

 

 

 

Psalm 95:1-2, 6-7, 8-9 (8)

Psalm 95:1

Gianni Barbiero, “Psalm 132:  A Prayer of `Solomon’”[5]

 

 

Psalm 95:6-7

Gabriel Torretta, O.P., “Preaching on Laughter:  The Theology of Laughter in Augustine’s Sermons”[6]

Come, let us bow down in worship; let us kneel before the LORD who made us.  For he is our God, and we are the people he shepherds, the flock he guides. Torretta writes the following about these verses:  “ . . . grace sets Christians free to laugh at the wicked’s self-delusions.”  That is what Jesus was doing on the Cross when he said, “My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?”

 

Psalm 95:7-11

Jack Levison, “A Theology of the Spirit in the Letter to the Hebrews”[7]

 

 

Psalm 95:7-9

Kevin W. Irwin, The Sacraments:  Historical Foundations and Liturgical Theology[8]

 

 

Psalm 95:8-11

Francis M. Macatangay, “Election by Allusion:  Exodus Themes in the Book of Tobit”[9]

 

 

2 Timothy 1:6-8, 13-14

2 Tim 1:6-14

Philip H. Towner, review of Michel Gourgues, Les deux lettres à Timothée, La letter ‘a Tite[10]

 

 

2 Timothy 1:6

John Calvin (1509-1564)[11]

 

 

2 Timothy 1:6

Daniel B. Wallace, With Scripture, Subject, and Greek Word Indexes: Greek Grammar:  Beyond the Basics: An Exegetical Syntax of the New Testament[12]

 

 

2 Timothy 1:7

Calvin[13]

 

 

2 Timothy 1:14

John Calvin (1509-1564)[14]

 

 

1 Peter 1:25

 

 

Luke 17:5-10

Luke 17:5-10[15]

Melanchthon

The English Annotations (1645, 1651, 1657)

= Catholic

Desiderius Erasmus (1466-1536)

Johannes Brenz (1499-1570)

Melanchthon

Konrad Pellikan (1478-1556)

 

 

Luke 17:5

Barbara E. Reid, O.P., “The Gospel of Luke:  Friend or Foe of Women Proclaimers of the Word?”[16]

 

 

Luke 17:6

St. Thérèse of Lisieux, The Story of a Soul:  A New Translation [17]

 

 

Luke 17:7-10

Pellikan[18]

 

 

Luke 17:5

Heinrich Bullinger (1504-1575)[19]

 

 

Luke 17:5

Zell, “Letter to the Suffering Women of the Community of Kentzingen Who Believe in Christ, Sisters with Me in Jesus Christ, 1524”[20]

 

 

Luke 17:5

Valentin Ickelshamer (c. 1500-1547)[21]

 

 

Luke 17:10

Francisco de Toledo (1532-1596)[22]

 

 

For more on sources see the Appendix file.  A complete set of Personal Notes, dating from the Fifteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time, July 14, 2002 to the present, is on the web site at www.western-civilization.com/CBQ/Personal%20Notes. 

 

 

 

The Responsorial Antiphon for this Sunday is If today you hear his voice, harden not your hearts (Ps 95:8).[23]

 

In the gobbledygook prayer at Sunday Mass immediately following the forgiveness of sins, the Faithful hearing the 2011 Roman Missal can listen for “almighty ever-living God.”[24]  For a more thorough examination of the illiterate 2011 Roman Missal, go to 1610 Missal:  Thirty-fourth Sunday in Ordinary Time 121125.pdf/htm at http://www.western-civilization.com/CBQ/Personal%20Notes/Personal%20Notes.htm.

 

This is a call for grace that some Black Baptists bring to mind with Who (Jesus) being the brightness of his glory, and the express image of his person, and upholding all things by the word of his power (Hebrews 1:3a).[25] 

 

Addenda

 

Personal Notes has been wary of Raymond Arroyo, host of “the World Over, on the Eternal Word Television Network, EWTN, attacking Pope Francis.  Personal Notes has watched for various Papal policies, like anything possibly construed as positive for Democrats, that Arroyo might systematically attack.  Nothing seemed to fall into place until a better realization of what the “Papal Posse,” with Robert Royal, a journalist, and Father Gerald Murray, a canon lawyer, means.  The Posse is out to find and attack Pope Francis, and this on a Catholic network.  This fell into place at the program Thursday, June 25, 2016.  EWTN represents the stand of the United States Catholic Conference of Bishops (USCCB). 

 

The Papal Posse appeared Thursday, September 15, 2016, to find fault with how Pope Francis is trying to show understanding and compassion to those divorced and remarried.  The document in question is the Apostolic Exhortation, Amoris Laetitia (The Joy of Love), presented February 12, 2015 to bishops, priests, deacons and consecrated persons, but dated March 19 and released Aril 8, 2016.

 

I have already read every article cited in the Catholic Biblical Quarterly.  At this stage I only read unread book reviews there.  Traditionally Theological Studies articles have been more helpful to my prayer life, but, if I have already read the article, I will cite it without annotation.  In a similar way, I present unread sections in Reformation Commentary on Scripture.

 

 

I intend to begin catching up on material postponed while recovering from the transition of ourselves from Virginia to Ohio and Marty into the next life.  If I ever get three months out, again, I then intend to reevaluate the amount of energy placed into Personal Notes each week.

 

 



[1] National Conference of Catholic Bishops, The Roman Missal Restored by Decree of the Second Ecumenical Council of the Vatican and Promulgated by Authority of Pope Paul VI: Lectionary for Mass:  For Use in the Dioceses of the United States of America:  Second Typical Edition:  Volume I:  Sundays, Solemnities, Feasts of the Lord and the Saints (Collegeville, Minnesota:  The Liturgical Press, 1988) 884.  Personal Notes refers to this book as the Lectionary.

 

[2] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament IV:  John 1—12, Craig S. Farmer (ed.), general editor, Timothy George, Associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch (ed.), (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2014, ISBN 978 0 8308-2967-5 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 14) 403.

 

[3] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 78, No. 1 (January 2016), 126, 127.

 

[4] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 76, No. 4 (October 2014), 690, 691.

 

[5] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 75, No. 2 (April 2013), 248.

 

[6] Theological Studies, Vol. 76, No. 4 (December 2015) 760.

 

[7] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 78, No. 1 (January 2016), 93.

 

[8] New York:  Paulist Press, 2016, 262.

 

[9] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 76, No. 3 (July 2014), 458.

 

[10] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 75, No. 2 (April 2013) 361.

 

[11] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  Old Testament V:  1-2 Samuel, 1-2 Kings, 1-2 Chronicles, Timothy George (ed.), general editor, Scot M. Manetsch, Associate General editor, Derek Cooper and Martin J. Lohrmann (ed.), (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2016, ISBN 978 0 8308-29552 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 16) 195.

 

[12] Grand Rapids: Michigan: Zondervan, 1996, 364.

 

[13] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament VI:  Acts, Esther Chung-Kim and Todd R. Hains (eds.), general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2014:  ISBN 978-0-8308-2969-9 (print) P 1 Y 14) 254.

 

[14] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament III:  Luke, Beth Kreitzer (ed.), general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2015:  ISBN 978-0-8308-2014 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 15) 5.

 

[15] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament III:  Luke, Beth Kreitzer (ed.), general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2015:  ISBN 978-0-8308-2014 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 15) 334-336.

 

[16] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 78, No. 1 (January 2016) 14.

 

[17] Robert J. Edmonson, CJ, (translator) (Brewster, Massachusetts: Paraclete Press, 2006), 162.

 

[18] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament III:  Luke, Beth Kreitzer (ed.), general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2015:  ISBN 978-0-8308-2014 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 15) 336.

 

[19] Karen J. Terry, Principal Investigator; Margaret Leland Smith, Data Analyst; Katarina Schuth O.S.F., Consultant; James R. Kelly, Consultant; Brenda Vollman, Research Associate;  Christina Massey, Research Associate,  The Causes and Context of Sexual Abuse of Minors by Catholic Priests in the United States, 1950-2010:  A Report Presented to the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops by the john Jay College Research Team (a pdf file downloaded May 18, 2011:  Washington D.C.:  United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, 2011) 227, fn. 39.

 

[20] In Scott H. Hendrix, ed. and trans., Early Protestant Spirituality (New York, Mahwah: Paulist Press, 2009) 106.

 

[21] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament III:  Luke, Beth Kreitzer (ed.), general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2015:  ISBN 978-0-8308-2014 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 15) 141, fn. 7.

 

[22] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament IV:  John 1—12, Craig S. Farmer (ed.), general editor, Timothy George, Associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch (ed.), (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2014, ISBN 978 0 8308-2967-5 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 14) 382, fn. 34.

 

[23] National Conference of Catholic Bishops, The Roman Missal Restored by Decree of the Second Ecumenical Council of the Vatican and Promulgated by Authority of Pope Paul VI: Lectionary for Mass:  For Use in the Dioceses of the United States of America:  Second Typical Edition:  Volume I:  Sundays, Solemnities, Feasts of the Lord and the Saints (Collegeville, Minnesota:  The Liturgical Press, 1988) 884.  Personal Notes refers to this book as the Lectionary.

 

[24] n.a., The Roman Missal:  Renewed by Decree of the Most Holy Second Ecumenical Council of the Vatican, Promulgated by Authority of Pope Paul VI and Revised at the Direction of Pope John Paul II:  English Translation According to the Third Typical Edition:  For Use in the Dioceses of the United States of America:  Approved by the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops and Confirmed by the Apostolic See (Washington, DC, United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, 2011) 487.  Personal Notes refers to this book as the Missal.

 

[25] UMI Annual Sunday School Lesson Commentary:  Precepts for Living ®: 2013-2014:  International Sunday School Lessons:  Volume 165:  UMI (Urban Ministries, Inc.), a. Okechuku Ogbonnaya, Ph.D., (ed.) (Chicago, IL  60643: UMI (Urban Ministries, Inc.), 2013) 51-52.

 

UMI Annual Sunday School Lesson Commentary:  Precepts for Living ®: 2016-2017:  International Sunday School Lessons:  Volume 19:  UMI (Urban Ministries, Inc.), A. Okechuku Ogbonnaya, Ph.D., (ed.) (Chicago, IL  60643: UMI (Urban Ministries, Inc.), 2016) 12-13.