A. W. Richard Sipe, “Scandal vs. crisis; PR vs. raw data” offers a path along which the institutional Church will travel to fix the current sexual coverup crisis.[1]  The first step is to suppress the problem.  The second step is to quarantine the problem.  The third step is to control the problem with public relations.  The fourth step is to fix the problem locally.  The fifth step is to fix the problem globally.  The sixth step is to get at the causes of the problem. 

 

Following this path, Cardinal Bernard Law exemplified suppressing the problem by attacking the media for reporting the problem.  The Papacy then tried to quarantine the problem to the United States.  Now the Papacy is using public relations to distract from the problem.  Fixing the problem by holding bishops accountable is gradually taking hold in Western courts.  By canonizing the Pope of the sexual coverup, John Paul II, the Church is demonstrating it has yet to accept responsibility for the problem.  Only after the Church accepts responsibility for what it is doing, will the Church be able to root out the causes of the sexual coverup.

 

Due to greater responsiveness at the National Catholic Reporter blog, beginning with the Fourth Sunday in Lent, Reading 032B, March 15, 2015, my interest began shifting from annotating my index here, to engaging conversation there.  I may keep up the Bibliography, but without further comment.  Time will tell.

 

Raymond Arroyo, “The World Over,” on EWTN uses fear-mongering, rather than the Joy of the Gospel to entrance its viewers.  In the past, Arroyo has responded to my concerns, particularly the Reverend Robert A. Sirico, who rarely appears anymore, with his drivel.  Beginning, May 3, 2015, I intend to begin pointing out, here, the role fear, rather than joy, has in “The World Over.”  Beginning July 26, 2015, I intend to begin pointing out attacks on the leadership of Pope Francis.

 

 

 

Readings

First Reading:                   Numbers 11:25-29

Responsorial Psalm:          Psalm 19:8, 110, 12-13, 14 (9a)

Second Reading:              James 5:1-6

Alleluia:                             cf. John 17:17b, 17a

Gospel:                             Mark 9:38-43, 45, 47-48

 

Bibliography

Numbers 11:25-29

Nm 11:25

George T. Montague, S.M., review of John R. Levison, Filled with the Spirit[2]

 

 

Psalm 19:8, 110, 12-13, 14 (9a)

Psalm 19:10

François Lambert, “Commentary in Luke 1:8-11”[3]

 

 

James 5:1-6

James 4:11—5:6

Michael Gilmour, review of John Painter and David A. DeSilva, James and Jude[4]

 

 

James 5:1, 2, 5

The Book of Homilies (1547; 1563; 1570), “Homily 18:  Against Excess of Apparel”[5]

 

 

James 5:4

Pope Francis, The Joy of the Gospel[6]

 

 

James 5:4

Daniel B. Wallace, With Scripture, Subject, and Greek Word Indexes: Greek Grammar:  Beyond the Basics: An Exegetical Syntax of the New Testament[7]

 

 

cf. John 17:17b, 17a

 

 

Mark 9:38-43, 45, 47-48

Mark 9:41

Desiderius Erasmus (1466-1536), “Brief Exegesis of Acts 20:35”[8]

 

 

Mark 9:48

The Second Helvetic Confession (1566), “Chapter II, Of Jesus Christ”

 

 

Mark 9:43-50

Leif E. Vaage, “An Other Home: Discipleship in Mark as Domestic Asceticism”[9]

 

 

For more on sources see the Appendix file.  A complete set of Personal Notes, dating from the Fifteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time, July 14, 2002 to the present, is on the web site at www.western-civilization.com/CBQ/Personal%20Notes. 

 

 

 

In the gobbledygook prayer at Sunday Mass immediately following the Gloria, the Faithful hearing the 2011 Roman Missal can listen for “manifest your almighty power.”[10]  The Responsorial Antiphon for this Sunday is The Precepts of the Lord give joy to the heart.[11]  That means not slamming the Pope week-after-week on “The World Over” with Raymond Arroyo on EWTN.  Between November 25, 2011 and November 25, 2012, Personal Notes systematically examined the illiterate 2011 Missal.  For a more thorough examination of the illiterate 2011 Roman Missal, go to 1370 Missal: Twenty-sixth Sunday in Ordinary Time 120930pdf/htm at http://www.western-civilization.com/CBQ/Personal%20Notes/Personal%20Notes.htm.

 

 

This is a call for grace that some Black Baptists bring to mind with But he, being full of the Holy Ghost, looked up steadfastly into heaven, and saw the glory of God, and Jesus standing on the right hand of God (Acts 7:55).[12] 

 



[2] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 72, No. 4 (October 2010) 832.

 

[3] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament III:  Luke, Beth Kreitzer (ed.), general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2015:  ISB 978-0-8308-2014 (hardcover : alk. Paper), P 1, Y 15) 9 fn. 10.

 

[4] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 76, No. 2 (April 2014) 372.

 

[5] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament III:  Luke, Beth Kreitzer (ed.), general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2015:  ISB 978-0-8308-2014 (hardcover : alk. Paper), P 1, Y 15) 191 fn. 3.

 

[6] Erlanger, Kentucky:  Libreria Editrice Vaticana, DynamicCatholic.com, 2014, 147.

 

[7] Grand Rapids: Michigan: Zondervan, 1996, 615, 621.

 

[8] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament VI:  Acts, Esther Chung-Kim and Todd R. Hains (eds.), general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2014) 287 fn. 27.

 

[9] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 71, No. 4 (2009) 744, 745, 757-759.

 

[10] n.a., The Roman Missal:  Renewed by Decree of the Most Holy Second Ecumenical Council of the Vatican, Promulgated by Authority of Pope Paul VI and Revised at the Direction of Pope John Paul II:  English Translation According to the Third Typical Edition:  For Use in the Dioceses of the United States of America:  Approved by the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops and Confirmed by the Apostolic See (Washington, DC, United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, 2011) .  Personal Notes refers to this book as the Missal.

 

[11] National Conference of Catholic Bishops, The Roman Missal Restored by Decree of the Second Ecumenical Council of the Vatican and Promulgated by Authority of Pope Paul VI: Lectionary for Mass:  For Use in the Dioceses of the United States of America:  Second Typical Edition:  Volume I:  Sundays, Solemnities, Feasts of the Lord and the Saints (Collegeville, Minnesota:  The Liturgical Press, 1988) 861.  Personal Notes refers to this book as the Lectionary.

 

[12] UMI Annual Sunday School Lesson Commentary:  Precepts for Living ®: 2015-2016:  International Sunday School Lessons:  Volume 18:  UMI (Urban Ministries, Inc.), A. Okechuku Ogbonnaya, Ph.D., (ed.) (Chicago, IL  60643: UMI (Urban Ministries, Inc.), 2015) 42-43.