This is the key Lectionary reading about slavery.  The name of the runaway slave is Onesimus, which in Greek means useful one.  Paul does not condemn slavery as an institution and neither did the Church, until the Twentieth Century.  The point of the readings, to cite the Catechism is a “growing understanding” of the Gospel.[1]

Annotated Bibliography

Material above the double line draws from material below the double line.  Those uninterested in scholarly details should stop reading here.  If they do, however, they may miss some of the fun stuff scholars are digging up.

 

First Reading: Wisdom 9:13 -18b

This reading is included in Pastoral Care for the Sick.[2]

 

Responsorial Psalm: Psalm 90, 3-4, 5-6, 12-13, 14, 17

          See the 2004 Personal Notes for the difference between 14-17 in the Lectionary and 14, 17 above.

 

Second Reading: Philemon

Paul describes himself as an old man, a term that the Greek permits to be translated as ambassador.  The Greek looks like presbyter to me.

 

The verse 11, which the Lectionary omits is: who was once useless to you, but is now useful to (both) you and me, includes a play on the name Onesimus and the Greek for useless and useful.

 

Phlm 21

Stanley N. Olson, “Pauline Expressions of confidence in His Addresses”[3]

Olson compares Philemon 21 [there are no chapters] with Rom 15:14, 2 Cor 7:4, 2 Cor 7:16, 2 Cor 9:1-2, and 2 Thess 3:4 for various expressions of confidence.

 


Alleluia: Psalm 119:135

Pastoral Care for the Sick uses Psalm 119 for funerals.[4]

 

          Psalm 119

          Anthony R. Ceresko, O.S.F.S., "Endings and Beginnings: Alphabetic Thinking and the Shaping of Psalms 106 and 150"[5]

While Psalm 119 is not an acrostic or alphabet psalm, the type of rational thinking associated with acrostic psalms does characterize this psalm.  Teach me your laws.

 

Gospel: Luke 14:25-33

Jesus relates the virtue of prudence to the Christian life.  In doing so, Jesus speaks about the person building the tower, and the king going into battle.

 

          Luke 14:28-33

          Craig L. Blomberg, "Interpreting the Parables of Jesus: Where Are We and Where Do We Go from Here?"[6]

There is a variety of ways to interpret the Parables.  When two or more people interact, two or more interpretations become available.  The Tower-Builder and the Warring King, however, can be classified as Monadic, that is with only one person.  This limits the variety of interpretations available.  The point in these parables is “the seriousness of counting the cost of discipleship.”  To my mind, however, the cost-benefit ratio means that the cost does not merit counting.

 

The topics listed for 2007 at www.justfaith.org/JM125.html 7/17/2007: Immigration, Climate change, The UN Millennium Development Goals, Federal Budget Priorities, and Prison Reform.  Other topics under consideration are Economic Development for the Poor, Rural Life, Militarism, Racism, Forming Small Justice Communities, and Community Organizing and Aging and the Elderly.  Racism would be the most significant problem for these readings.  My intention is to leave this notice here for the next presentation, before relegating the announcement to the Appendix.

 

 

For more on sources see the Appendix file.  Personal Notes are on the web site at www.western-civilization.com/CBQ/Personal%20Notes



[1] United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, United States Catholic Catechism for Adults (Washington, D.C.: United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, 2006) 501.

 

[2] The Roman Ritual: Revised by Decree of the Second Vatican Ecumenical Council and Published by Authority of Pope Paul VI: Pastoral Care of the Sick: Rites of Anointing and Viaticum: Approved for use in the dioceses of the United States of America by the National Conference of Catholic Bishops and Confirmed by the Apostolic See: Prepared by International Commission on English in the Liturgy: a Joint Commission of Catholic Bishops’ Conferences (New York: Catholic Book Publishing Co. 1983) 256.

 

[3] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 47, No. 2 (April 1985) 283.

 

[4] The Roman Ritual: Revised by Decree of the Second Vatican Ecumenical Council and Published by Authority of Pope Paul VI: Pastoral Care of the Sick: Rites of Anointing and Viaticum: Approved for use in the dioceses of the United States of America by the National Conference of Catholic Bishops and Confirmed by the Apostolic See: Prepared by International Commission on English in the Liturgy: a Joint Commission of Catholic Bishops’ Conferences (New York: Catholic Book Publishing Co. 1983) 286.

 

[5] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 68, No. 1 (January 2006) 34.

 

[6] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 53, No. 1 (January 1991) 75, 77.