Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR/Cas9) is the revolutionary genome-editing technique, that puts the power of evolution into human hands, looks as significant as atomic fission to the point that scientists are warning about ethical dilemmas.  The need to get moral theologians from under the uninformed Papal thumb is greater than ever.  The 1990 American Association of University Professors (AAUP) censure of the administration of The Catholic University is disheartening.

 

The readings for this Sunday are about fraternal correction.  So far, the efforts of the AAUP have been unavailing.  Far more important than freeing up RCC Catholic moral theologians to examine CRISPR is the need for CRISPR scientists for the considered opinions of moral theologians.  It looks to me as if CRISPR can be applied at the level of the one-cell human zygote, about which I often blog on the National Catholic Reporter web site and occasionally here.

 

As Desiderius Erasmus (1456-1536) put it:  bridging gaps, smoothing rough passages, bringing order out of confusion and simplicity out of complication, untying knots, (and) throwing light on dark places.”[1]  Such is a function of Personal Notes.  Appropriately, the Responsorial Antiphon for this Sunday is If today you hear his voice, harden not your hearts.[2] 

 

 

Material above the solid line draws from material below the solid line.  Those uninterested in scholarly and tangential details should stop reading here.  If they do, however, they may miss some interesting material.

 

Readings

First Reading                     Ezekiel 33:7-9

Responsorial Psalm:          Psalm 95:1-2, 6-7, 8-9 (8)

Second Reading:               Romans 13:8-10

Alleluia:                             2 Corinthians 5:19

Gospel:                             Matthew 18:15-20

 

Annotated Bibliography

 

Ezekiel 33:7-9

Ezekiel 33:7-9

in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  Old Testament XII: Ezekiel, Daniel, (ed.) Carl L. Beckwith (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic, An Imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2012: ISBN 978-0-8308-2962-0 P 1 Y 12) 158-159.

 

 

Ezekiel 33:8

in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament VI:  Acts, Esther Chung-Kim and Todd R. Hains (eds.), general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2014:  ISBN 978-0-8308-2969-9 (print) P 1 Y 14) 282.

 

 

Ezekiel 33:8

in Scott H. Hendrix, ed. and trans., Early Protestant Spirituality (New York, Mahwah: Paulist Press, 2009) 83.

 

 

Psalm 95:1-2, 6-7, 8-9 (8)

Psalm 95:1

in Scott H. Hendrix, ed. and trans., Early Protestant Spirituality (New York, Mahwah: Paulist Press, 2009) 191.

 

 

Psalm 95:6-7

Gabriel Torretta, O.P., “Preaching on Laughter:  The Theology of Laughter in Augustine’s Sermons”[3]

 

 

Psalm 95:7-11

Jack Levison, “A Theology of the Spirit in the Letter to the Hebrews”[4]

 

 

Psalm 95:7-11

James W. Thompson, review of Mary Healy, Hebrews[5]

Thompson reports, “The commentary’s strength is not in describing the world behind the text but rather the world in front of the text,” i.e. it is a nice devotional text, but unsuited for my devotion.

 

Psalm 95:8-11

Francis M. Macatangay, “Election by Allusion:  Exodus Themes in the Book of Tobit”[6]

 

 

Psalm 95:7-9

Kevin W. Irwin, The Sacraments:  Historical Foundations and Liturgical Theology

(New York:  Paulist Press, 2016) 262.

 

 

Romans 13:8-10

Romans 13:8-10

in Scott H. Hendrix, ed. and trans., Early Protestant Spirituality (New York, Mahwah: Paulist Press, 2009) 69, 157, 158, 285

 

 

Romans 13:8-10

in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  Old Testament VII:  Psalms 1—72, Timothy George (ed.), general editor, Scot M. Manetsch, Associate General editor, Herman J. Selderhuis (ed.), (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2015, ISBN 978 0 8308-2957-6 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 15) 115.

 

 


 

Romans 13:8, 10

Pope Francis, The Joy of the Gospel  (Erlanger, Kentucky:  Libreria Editrice Vaticana, DynamicCatholic.com, 2014) 126.

 

 

Romans 13:8

Daniel B. Wallace, With Scripture, Subject, and Greek Word Indexes: Greek Grammar:  Beyond the Basics: An Exegetical Syntax of the New Testament[7]

 

2 Corinthians 5:19

 

 

Matthew 18:15-20

Romans 13:10

in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament VIII:  Romans 9—16, Timothy George (ed.), general editor; Scot M. Manetsch, Associate General editor; Philip D. W. Krey and Peter D. S. Krey (ed.), (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2016, ISBN 978 0 8308-2971-2, P 1, Y 16) 59, 62

 

 

Rom 13:1-8

Benjamin White, review of Rafael Rodríguez, If you call Yourself a Jew:  Reappraising Paul’s Letter to the Romans[8]

 

 

Rom 13:8-10

Robert L. Foster, “The Justice of the Gentiles:  Revisiting the Purpose of Romans”[9]

 

 

Romans 13:8-10

Marie Dentičre (1495-1561)

To excuse themselves, they (misogynists)  will say, “It is not up to women to know it, nor to people who are not learned, who do not have degrees and the rank of doctor; but they should just believe simply without questioning anything” . . . Ha! It is certainly true that many of your people will live like that, giving to Scripture many meanings and giving you a bag to fill up . . . [10]

 

Matthew 18:15-20

in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament IXa:  1 Corinthians, Edited by Scott M. Manetsch, General Editor Timothy George, Associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 20167, ISBN 978 0 8308-2972 9 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 17) 86, 88, 88, 92, 92.

 

 

Matthew 18:15, 17, 20

in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament III:  Luke, Beth Kreitzer (ed.), general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2015:  ISBN 978-0-8308-2014 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 15) 171m 144, 482, 483

 

 

Matthew 18:15-17

in Scott H. Hendrix, ed. and trans., Early Protestant Spirituality (New York, Mahwah: Paulist Press, 2009) 283.

 

 

Matthew 18:15

Pope Francis, The Joy of the Gospel 

(Erlanger, Kentucky:  Libreria Editrice Vaticana, DynamicCatholic.com, 2014) 134.

 

 

Matt 18:17

Eugene Eung-Chun Park, “Covenantal Nomism and the Gospel of Matthew”[11]

 

 

Matt 18:18

Christopher W. Skinner, review of James W. Barker, John’s Use of Matthew[12]

 

 

Matt 18:19-20

Benedict T. Viviano, O.P., review of J. Andrew Doole, What Was Mark for Matthew?[13]

 

 

For more on sources see the Appendix file.  A complete set of Personal Notes, dating from the Fifteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time, July 14, 2002 to the present, is on the web site at www.western-civilization.com/CBQ/Personal%20Notes. 

 

 

 

In the gobbledygook prayer at Sunday Mass immediately following the Gloria, the Faithful hearing the 2011 Roman Missal can listen for “that those who believe in Christ may receive true freedom.”[14]  The Responsorial Antiphon for this Sunday is If today you hear his voice, harden not your hearts.[15]  Between November 25, 2011 and November 25, 2012, Personal Notes systematically examined the illiterate 2011 Missal.  For a more thorough examination of the illiterate 2011 Roman Missal, go to 1610 Missal: Thirty-fourth Sunday in Ordinary Time 121125.pdf/htm at http://www.western-civilization.com/CBQ/Personal%20Notes/Personal%20Notes.htm.

 

 

This is a call for grace that some Black Baptists bring to mind with This is my covenant, which ye shall keep, between me and you and they seed after thee; Every man child among you shall be circumcised (Genesis 17:10).[16]

Addenda

 

Due to greater responsiveness at the National Catholic Reporter blog, beginning with the Fourth Sunday in Lent, Reading 032B, March 15, 2015, my interest began shifting from annotating my index here, to engaging conversation there.  I may keep up the Bibliography, but without further comment.  Time will tell.  Beginning with the Second Sunday of Easter, April 23, 2017, my interest began shifting back toward annotating the Catholic Biblical Quarterly.

 

On Wednesday, December 28, 2016, I discovered that my web site, www.western-civilization.com was receiving 1000 hits per day, from the United States, most of which were for these readings.  That complicates my priorities, priorities that require balancing between developing these Personal Notes, engaging writing on the National Catholic Reporter at https://www.ncronline.org/blogs/ncr-today, developing a Cleveland Organizing Branch of the Association for the Study of African American Life and History (ASALH), attending to my archival resources at the Western Reserve Historical Society, and preparing my 1972 dissertation, “Cleveland and the Negro following World War II” for publication at least on the web.  I am the founding president of the Hampton Roads Branch of ASALH, from which the movie “Hidden Figures” arose, meaning that these priorities have potential consequences of note.

 

Raymond Arroyo, “The World Over,” on EWTN uses fear-mongering, rather than the Joy of the Gospel to entrance its viewers.  In the past, Arroyo has responded to my concerns, particularly the Reverend Robert A. Sirico, who rarely appears anymore, with his drivel.  Beginning, May 3, 2015, I intend to begin pointing out, here, the role fear, rather than joy, has in “The World Over.”  Arroyo would do better to get his “Papal Posse” off the air as well.  The bias against Catholic Democratic legislators is unbecoming.

 

By July 31, I had identified a pattern of attack on Pope Francis by Arroyo.  The attack is on what the Pope is preaching about climate change and capitalism.  In the United States Republicans have firm opposition to such sermonizing, as the forthcoming Trump administration will show . . . or not.  On June 4 Trump pulled out of the Paris Agreement on Climate Change.

 

As, on June 23, 2015, I prepared Reading 110B for the Seventeenth Sunday in Ordinary time for July 26, I decided to begin reading unread book reviews and articles from Theological Studies for two reasons.  The first is I have already read every article cited in the Catholic Biblical Quarterly.  The second is that traditionally Theological Studies articles have been more helpful to my prayer life.  I also began reading unread book reviews in the Biblical Quarterly.  Beginning with the Second Sunday of Easter, April 23, 2017, I realized the Reformation Commentary on Scripture was doing little for my prayer-life and I began to drift away from the time-consuming details I had been recording. 

 

As of August 4, 2017, Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament IXa:  1 Corinthians, Edited by Scott M. Manetsch, General Editor Timothy George, Associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 20167, ISBN 978 0 8308-2972 9 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 17) was indexed.  My intention is to read and annotate unread sections until the book is entirely read.

 

The following by Desiderius Erasmus (1466-1536) helps explain what is happening in these Personal Notes. 

 

When his opponents accused him of tampering with Scripture, Erasmus defended his work by insisting that he had elucidated Paul’s meaning by “bridging gaps, smoothing rough passages, bringing order out of confusion and simplicity out of complication, untying knots, (and) throwing light on dark places.”[17]

 



[1] Scott M. Manetsch, “Introduction to 1 Corinthians,” in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament IXa:  1 Corinthians, Edited by Scott M. Manetsch, General Editor Timothy George, Associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 20167, ISBN 978 0 8308-2972 9 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 17) l [=50].

 

[2] National Conference of Catholic Bishops, The Roman Missal Restored by Decree of the Second Ecumenical Council of the Vatican and Promulgated by Authority of Pope Paul VI: Lectionary for Mass:  For Use in the Dioceses of the United States of America:  Second Typical Edition:  Volume I:  Sundays, Solemnities, Feasts of the Lord and the Saints (Collegeville, Minnesota:  The Liturgical Press, 1988) 813.  Personal Notes refers to this book as the Lectionary.

 

[3] Theological Studies, Vol. 76, No. 4 (December 2015) 760.

 

[4] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 78, No. 1 (January 2016) 93.

 

[5] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 79, No. 2 (April 2017) 342.

 

[6] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 76, No. 3 (July 2014) 458.

 

[7] Grand Rapids: Michigan: Zondervan, 1996, 235, 581.

 

[8] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 78, No. 4 (October 2016) 790.

 

[9] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 76, No. 4 (October 2014) 700.

 

[10] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament VIII:  Romans 9—16, Timothy George (ed.), general editor; Scot M. Manetsch, Associate General editor; Philip D. W. Krey and Peter D. S. Krey (ed.), (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2016, ISBN 978 0 8308-2971-2, P 1, Y 16) 164-168.

 

[11] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 77, No. 4 (October 2015) 675, 681.

 

[12] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 79, No. 1 (January 2017) 136.

 

[13] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 76, No. 4 (October 2014) 762.

 

[14] n.a., The Roman Missal:  Renewed by Decree of the Most Holy Second Ecumenical Council of the Vatican, Promulgated by Authority of Pope Paul VI and Revised at the Direction of Pope John Paul II:  English Translation According to the Third Typical Edition:  For Use in the Dioceses of the United States of America:  Approved by the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops and Confirmed by the Apostolic See (Washington, DC, United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, 2011) 403.  Personal Notes refers to this book as the Missal.

 

[15] National Conference of Catholic Bishops, The Roman Missal Restored by Decree of the Second Ecumenical Council of the Vatican and Promulgated by Authority of Pope Paul VI: Lectionary for Mass:  For Use in the Dioceses of the United States of America:  Second Typical Edition:  Volume I:  Sundays, Solemnities, Feasts of the Lord and the Saints (Collegeville, Minnesota:  The Liturgical Press, 1988) 813.  Personal Notes refers to this book as the Lectionary.

 

[16] UMI Annual Sunday School Lesson Commentary:  Precepts for Living ®: 2017-2018:  International Sunday School Lessons:  Volume 20:  UMI (Urban Ministries, Inc.), Adonijah Okechuku Ogbonnaya, Ph.D., (ed.) (Chicago, IL  60643: UMI (Urban Ministries, Inc.), 2017) 26-27.

[17] Scott M. Manetsch, “Introduction to 1 Corinthians,” in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament IXa:  1 Corinthians, Edited by Scott M. Manetsch, General Editor Timothy George, Associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 20167, ISBN 978 0 8308-2972 9 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 17) l [=50].