You duped me, O LORD, and I let myself be duped; you were too strong for me, and you triumphed.  All the day I am an object of laughter; everyone mocks me (Jeremiah 20:7).  That used to be the case for me, especially in high school.  My questions were almost always outside the box of political correctness.  I saw little need to ask questions, otherwise.

Now, in my old age, with more degrees behind my name than I have names, people laugh at me less frequently, if at all.  Now they tend to get angry and to pull political strings to shut me up.  That does not happen, mainly because I have woven the virtue of prudence into what I do.

 

My soul is thirsting for you, O Lord my God (Psalm 63:2b).  I used to get migraine headaches when I realized others did not care and there was nothing I could do about it.  that stopped when I got a better bead on how people thought from the college classroom.  To my amazement, I learned that the correct assumption was that someone always had a Bible in my secular community college classes.  Then I would really get irritated when my co-religionists proclaimed that one could not find fear of the Lord in public education.  I feared the Lord and I was in public education; but I also honored academic rigor and following the truth wherever it led, despite current Church politics.

 

My academic tenure came as an expectation that I would conform yourselves to this age but be transformed by the renewal of your mind (Romans 12:2).  The need was to recognize Church politics for what it was in the midst of truth.  Much of my experience was during the reign of Saint Pope John Paul II (1978-2005), the Saint of the sexual cover-ups, devoted to prioritizing church politics over truth and the very lives of the Faithful.  That is why Jesus began to show his disciples that he must go to Jerusalem and suffer greatly from the elders, the chief priests, and the scribes (Matthew 16:21).

 

 

Material above the solid line draws from material below the solid line.  Those uninterested in scholarly and tangential details should stop reading here.  If they do, however, they may miss some interesting material.

 

Readings

First Reading                     Jeremiah 20:7-9

Responsorial Psalm:          Psalm 63:2, 3-4, 5-6, 8-9 (2b)

Second Reading:               Romans 12:1-2

Alleluia:                             cf. Ephesians 1:17-18

Gospel:                             Matthew 16:21-27

 

Annotated Bibliography

 

Jeremiah 20:7-9

Jeremiah 20:8

in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament VIII:  Romans 9—16, Timothy George (ed.), general editor; Scot M. Manetsch, Associate General editor; Philip D. W. Krey and Peter D. S. Krey (ed.), (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2016, ISBN 978 0 8308-2971-2, P 1, Y 16) 232.

 

 

Jeremiah 20:9

in Scott H. Hendrix, ed. and trans., Early Protestant Spirituality (New York, Mahwah: Paulist Press, 2009) 67.

 

 

Psalm 63:2, 3-4, 5-6, 8-9 (2b)

Care of the Sick uses both Romans 12:1-2 and Psalm 63,[1] as means of consolation.

 

Psalm 63:2, 3-4, 5-6, 8-9

in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  Old Testament VII:  Psalms 1—72, Timothy George (ed.), general editor, Scot M. Manetsch, Associate General editor, Herman J. Selderhuis (ed.), (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2015, ISBN 978 0 8308-2957-6 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 15) 439-442.

 

 

Romans 12:1-2

Care of the Sick uses both Romans 12:1-2 and Psalm 63,[2] as means of consolation.

 

 

Romans 12:1-2

in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament VIII:  Romans 9—16, Timothy George (ed.), general editor; Scot M. Manetsch, Associate General editor; Philip D. W. Krey and Peter D. S. Krey (ed.), (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2016, ISBN 978 0 8308-2971-2, P 1, Y 16) 118-126.

 

 

Romans 12:1, 2

in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament VI:  Acts, Esther Chung-Kim and Todd R. Hains (eds.), general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2014:  ISBN 978-0-8308-2969-9 (print) P 1 Y 14) 126, 229.

 

 

Romans 12:1

in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  Old Testament VII:  Psalms 1—72, Timothy George (ed.), general editor, Scot M. Manetsch, Associate General editor, Herman J. Selderhuis (ed.), (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2015, ISBN 978 0 8308-2957-6 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 15) 454.

 

 

Romans 12:1

in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  Old Testament V:  1-2 Samuel, 1-2 Kings, 1-2 Chronicles, Timothy George (ed.), general editor, Scot M. Manetsch, Associate General editor, Derek Cooper and Martin J. Lohrmann (ed.), (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2016, ISBN 978 0 8308-2955-2[RJ1]  (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 16) 304.

 

 

Romans 12:1

Kevin W. Irwin, The Sacraments:  Historical Foundations and Liturgical Theology (New York:  Paulist Press, 2016) 104,116, 153.

 

 


 

Matthew 16:24

Daniel B. Wallace, With Scripture, Subject, and Greek Word Indexes: Greek Grammar:  Beyond the Basics: An Exegetical Syntax of the New Testament[3]

 

cf. Ephesians 1:17-18

Ephesians 1:17-18

in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament X: Galatians, Ephesians, (ed.) Gerald L. Bray (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic, An Imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2011: ISBN 978-0-8308-2973-6 (P 1 Y 11) 40-43.

 

 

Matthew 16:21-27

Matt 16:13-28

Steven L. Bridge, review of Nathan Eubank, Wages of Cross-Bearing and the Debt of Sin:  The Economy of Heaven in Matthew’s Gospel[4]

 

 

Matthew 16:21, 23, 24

in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament IV:  John 1—12, Craig S. Farmer (ed.), general editor, Timothy George, Associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch (ed.), (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2014, ISBN 978 0 8308-2967-5 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 14) 95, 241, 404, 454.

 

 

Matt 16:21-23

Warren Carter, review of Robert K. Macewen, Matthean Posteriority:  An Exploration of Matthew’s Use of Mark and Luke as a Solution to the Synoptic Problem, Robert H. Gundry, Peter:  False Disciple and Apostate according to Saint Matthew, Derek A. Olsen, Reading Matthew with Monks:  Liturgical Interpretation in Anglo-Saxon England[5]

 

 

Matthew 16:22, 24, 26

in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament III:  Luke, Beth Kreitzer (ed.), general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2015:  ISBN 978-0-8308-2014 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 15) 200, 201, 447.

 

 

Matthew 16:23

in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  Old Testament V:  1-2 Samuel, 1-2 Kings, 1-2 Chronicles, Timothy George (ed.), general editor, Scot M. Manetsch, Associate General editor, Derek Cooper and Martin J. Lohrmann (ed.), (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2016, ISBN 978 0 8308-2955-2[RJ2]  (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 16) 547.

 

 

Matthew 16:24-25

in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament VI:  Acts, Esther Chung-Kim and Todd R. Hains (eds.), general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2014:  ISBN 978-0-8308-2969-9 (print) P 1 Y 14) 86, 198.

 

 

Matthew 16:24

in Scott H. Hendrix, ed. and trans., Early Protestant Spirituality (New York, Mahwah: Paulist Press, 2009) 110.

 

 

For more on sources see the Appendix file.  A complete set of Personal Notes, dating from the Fifteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time, July 14, 2002 to the present, is on the web site at www.western-civilization.com/CBQ/Personal%20Notes. 

 

 

 

In the gobbledygook prayer at Sunday Mass immediately following the Gloria, the Faithful hearing the 2011 Roman Missal can listen for “put into our hearts he love of your name.”[6]  The Responsorial Antiphon for this Sunday is My soul is thirsting for you, O Lord my God (Psalm 63:2b).[7]  Between November 25, 2011 and November 25, 2012, Personal Notes systematically examined the illiterate 2011 Missal.  For a more thorough examination of the illiterate 2011 Roman Missal, go to 1610 Missal: Thirty-fourth Sunday in Ordinary Time 121125.pdf/htm at http://www.western-civilization.com/CBQ/Personal%20Notes/Personal%20Notes.htm.

 

 

This is a call for grace that some Black Baptists bring to mind with And I will establish my covenant with you, neither shall all flesh be cut off any more by the waters of a flood; neither shall there anymore be a flood to destroy the earth (Genesis 9:11).[8] 

Addenda

 

Due to greater responsiveness at the National Catholic Reporter blog, beginning with the Fourth Sunday in Lent, Reading 032B, March 15, 2015, my interest began shifting from annotating my index here, to engaging conversation there.  I may keep up the Bibliography, but without further comment.  Time will tell.  Beginning with the Second Sunday of Easter, April 23, 2017, my interest began shifting back toward annotating the Catholic Biblical Quarterly.

 

On Wednesday, December 28, 2016, I discovered that my web site, www.western-civilization.com was receiving 1000 hits per day, from the United States, most of which were for these readings.  That complicates my priorities, priorities that require balancing between developing these Personal Notes, engaging writing on the National Catholic Reporter at https://www.ncronline.org/blogs/ncr-today, developing a Cleveland Organizing Branch of the Association for the Study of African American Life and History (ASALH), attending to my archival resources at the Western Reserve Historical Society, and preparing my 1972 dissertation, “Cleveland and the Negro following World War II” for publication at least on the web.  I am the founding president of the Hampton Roads Branch of ASALH, from which the movie “Hidden Figures” arose, meaning that these priorities have potential consequences of note.

 

Raymond Arroyo, “The World Over,” on EWTN uses fear-mongering, rather than the Joy of the Gospel to entrance its viewers.  In the past, Arroyo has responded to my concerns, particularly the Reverend Robert A. Sirico, who rarely appears anymore, with his drivel.  Beginning, May 3, 2015, I intend to begin pointing out, here, the role fear, rather than joy, has in “The World Over.” 

 

By July 31, I had identified a pattern of attack on Pope Francis by Arroyo.  The attack is on what the Pope is preaching about climate change and capitalism.  In the United States Republicans have firm opposition to such sermonizing, as the forthcoming Trump administration will show . . . or not.  On June 4 Trump pulled out of the Paris Agreement on Climate Change.

 

As, on June 23, 2015, I prepared Reading 110B for the Seventeenth Sunday in Ordinary time for July 26, I decided to begin reading unread book reviews and articles from Theological Studies for two reasons.  The first is I have already read every article cited in the Catholic Biblical Quarterly.  The second is that traditionally Theological Studies articles have been more helpful to my prayer life.  I also began reading unread book reviews in the Biblical Quarterly.  Beginning with the Second Sunday of Easter, April 23, 2017, I realized the Reformation Commentary on Scripture was doing little for my prayer-life and I began to drift away from the time-consuming details I had been recording.  I intend to keep on reading that Commentary, however.  For this Sunday there were no unread book reviews or articles.  Because I am far behind indexing in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament IXa:  1 Corinthians, Edited by Scott M. Manetsch, General Editor Timothy George, Associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 20167, ISBN 978 0 8308-2972 9 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 17) I have not digged any deeper.

 

 

 



 

[1] International Commission on English in the Liturgy: A Joint Commission of Catholic Bishops’ Conferences, The Roman Ritual: Revised by Decree of the Second Vatican Ecumenical Council and Published by Authority of Pope Paul VI: Pastoral Care of the Sick: Rites of Anointing and Viaticum: Approved for Use in the Dioceses of the United States of America by the National Conference of Catholic Bishops and Confirmed by the Apostolic See (New York: Catholic Book Publishing Co., 1983) 267, 289.

 

[2] International Commission on English in the Liturgy: A Joint Commission of Catholic Bishops’ Conferences, The Roman Ritual: Revised by Decree of the Second Vatican Ecumenical Council and Published by Authority of Pope Paul VI: Pastoral Care of the Sick: Rites of Anointing and Viaticum: Approved for Use in the Dioceses of the United States of America by the National Conference of Catholic Bishops and Confirmed by the Apostolic See (New York: Catholic Book Publishing Co., 1983) 267, 289.

 

[3] Grand Rapids: Michigan: Zondervan, 1996, 347, 351, 419, 486, 706.

 

[4] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 76 (2014) #4 765.

 

[5] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 78 (2016) #2 375.

[6] n.a., The Roman Missal:  Renewed by Decree of the Most Holy Second Ecumenical Council of the Vatican, Promulgated by Authority of Pope Paul VI and Revised at the Direction of Pope John Paul II:  English Translation According to the Third Typical Edition:  For Use in the Dioceses of the United States of America:  Approved by the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops and Confirmed by the Apostolic See (Washington, DC, United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, 2011) 482.  Personal Notes refers to this book as the Missal.

 

[7] National Conference of Catholic Bishops, The Roman Missal Restored by Decree of the Second Ecumenical Council of the Vatican and Promulgated by Authority of Pope Paul VI: Lectionary for Mass:  For Use in the Dioceses of the United States of America:  Second Typical Edition:  Volume I:  Sundays, Solemnities, Feasts of the Lord and the Saints (Collegeville, Minnesota:  The Liturgical Press, 1988) 799 .  Personal Notes refers to this book as the Lectionary.

 

[8] UMI Annual Sunday School Lesson Commentary:  Precepts for Living ®: 2017-2018:  International Sunday School Lessons:  Volume 20:  UMI (Urban Ministries, Inc.), Adonijah Okechuku Ogbonnaya, Ph.D., (ed.) (Chicago, IL  60643: UMI (Urban Ministries, Inc.), 2017) 16-17.


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