Personal Notes has an investment in the Reformation Commentary on Scripture.  The reason is ecumenical in the sense that both Protestants and Catholics help form culture in the United States of America.  There has been enough of a competitive approach between Protestants and Catholics.  Kevin W. Irwin, a priest of the Archdiocese of New York has written a paragraph to help explain Personal Notes.[1]

 

Commentators have observed that to understand Luther, one must recognize a series of “either . . . or” rhetorical and methodological assertions that dominate his writings.  Among them is the underlying assumption that the Eucharist is a beneficium (“gracious benefit”) to us rather than a sacrificium (“the sacrifice we offer to God”).  Another is that the Eucharist is a gift from God to us, not from us to God.  In addition, many of Luther’s critiques are based on his famous solus Christus [sic] [no comma] (Christ alone, not tradition or the magisterium), and sola gratia, [sic] [with the comma, which I suspect is non-standard grammar] (grace alone, not good works).  Catholic theologians would counter with a “both . . . and” rhetoric, seeing the Eucharist as an act both of Christ and of the whole church, as both a sacrifice and a benefit, as both from God to us and from us to God, and as both grace and good works.

 

Protestants, of all stripes, seem to focus on a particular aspect of the Catholic Church, without systematically balancing out unintended consequences.  Now is the time to overlook what can be overlooked and to join together in what can be done together.  The greater balance that the Faithful can anticipate from sharing insights ought to be helpful dealing with the radical Islamic crisis world-wide.

 

 

Readings

First Reading                     Ecclesiastes 1:2; 2:21-23

Responsorial Psalm:          Psalm 90:3-4, 5-6, 12-13 (8)

Second Reading:               Colossians 3:1-5, 9-11

Alleluia:                             Matthew 5:3 (See Reading 70A)

Gospel:                             Luke 12:13-21

 

Annotated Bibliography

Musings above the solid line draw from material below.  Those disinterested in scholarly and tangential details should stop reading here.  If they do, however, they may miss some interesting prayer-provoking details.

 

 

Ecclesiastes 1:2; 2:21-23

Eccles 1:12—2:26

Alexander A. Di Lella, O.F.M., review of Jesús Asurmendi, Du non-sens l’Ecclésiaste[2]

 

 

Eccles 2:18-22

Addison G. Wright, P.S.S., “Ecclesiastes 9:1-12:  An Emphatic Statement of Themes”[3]

 

 

Psalm 90:3-4, 5-6, 12-13 (8)

Pastoral Care of the Sick includes this Psalm.[4]

 

 

Psalm 90:4

Nicholas R. Werse, “Second Temple Jewish Literary Traditions in 2 Peter”[5]

 

 

Psalm 90:4

St. Thérèse of Lisieux, The Story of a Soul:  A New Translation[6]

 

 

Psalm 90:4

Heinrich Bullinger (1504-1575)[7]

 

 

Colossians 3:1-5, 9-11

Col 3:1-17

Bonnie Thurston, review of Christopher R. Seitz, Colossians[8]

 

 

Col 3:1-15a

John Gillman, review of Jeremy Gabrielson, Paul’s Non-Violent [sic] Gospel:  The Theological Politics of Pease in Paul’s Life and Letters[9]

Gillman reports, “the insufficient attention he gives to those passages in the Gospels that present a conflicting point of view.”

 

Colossians 3:1-11

Donald Dale Walker, review of Pheme Perkins, First Corinthians[10]

 

 

Colossians 3:1-5, 9-11[11]

Peter Martyr Vermigli (1499-1562)

John Calvin (1509-1564)

Theodore Beza (1516-1605)

Vermigli

Calvin

Beza

Vermigli

Melanchthon

Melanchthon

John Davenant (

Davenant

Vermigli

Martin Luther (1483-1546)

Huldrych Zwingli (1484-1531)

Formula of Concord (1577)

Melanchthon

Davenant

Vermigli

Calvin

Davenant

Luther

Melanchthon

Davenant

Owen

Thomas Cartwright (1535-1606)

Jacobus Arminius (1559-1609)

Martin Bucer

Luther

Davenant

Zwingli

Arminius

Martin Chemnitz (1522-1586)

Davenant

Jean Daillé

Davenant

Desiderius Erasmus (1466-1536)

Melanchthon

Calvin

Zwingli

Davenant

Gasparo Contarini (1483-1542)

Owen

Arminius

Calvin

Vermigli

Davenant

Davenant

Melanchthon

Melanchthon

Melanchthon

 

Colossians 3:1-2

Girolamo Zanchi (1516-1590)[12]

 

Colossians 3:1

Johann Eck (1486-1543)[13]

 

Colossians 3:1

Wolfgang Musculus (1497-1563)[14]

 

Colossians 3:1

Calvin[15]

 

Colossians 3:3

Melanchthon[16]

 

Colossians 3:4

Peter Walpot (d. 1578)[17]

 

Colossians 3:3-4

Urbanus Rhegius, “Apothecary of the Soul for the Healthy and the Sick in These Dangerous Times, 1529”[18]

 

Colossians 3:3-4

Viktorin Strigel (1524-1569)[19]

 

Colossians 3:4

Martin Bucer, “How to Live for Others and Not for Oneself, 1523”[20]

 

Colossians 3:5

Erasmus[21]

 

Colossians 3:5

John Davenant (1576-1641)[22]

 

Col 3:5

William T. Cavanaugh, “Return of the Golden calf:  Economy, Idolatry, and Secularization since Gaudium et spes”[23]

 

 

Colossians 3:11

Rudolf Gwalther (1519-1586)[24]

 

 

Colossians 3:11

Johannes Bugenhagen (1485-1558)[25]

 

 

Matthew 5:3 (See Reading 70A)

 

 

Luke 12:13-21

Luke 12:13-34

Andrew Arterbury, review of Matthew S. Rindge, Jesus’ Parable of the Rich Fool:  Luke 12:13-34 among Ancient Conversations on Death and Possessions[26]

The parable is not only about greed, but also about the proper relationship between death and possessions.

 

Luke 12:16-21

Nathan Eubank, “Storing Up Treasure with God in the Heavens:  Celestial Investments in Matthew 6:121”[27]

 

 

Luke 12;16-21

Frank J. Matera, The Sermon on the Mount:  The Perfect Measure of the Christian Life[28]

 

 

Luke 12:14

Ulrich Zwingli, “Letter to Ambrosius Blarer, May 4, 1528”[29]

 

 

Luke 13:15

Stephen Finlan, review of Richard B. Hays, Reading Backwards:  Figural Christology and the Fourfold Gospel Witness[30]

 

 

Luke 12:17

Daniel B. Wallace, With Scripture, Subject, and Greek Word Indexes: Greek Grammar:  Beyond the Basics: An Exegetical Syntax of the New Testament[31]

 

 

Luke 12:21

Joshua A. Noble, “`Rich toward God’:  Making Sense of Luke 12:21”[32]

 

 

Luke 12:13-21[33]

Augustin Marlorat (c. 1506-1562)

Peter Riedemann (1506-1556)

Balthasar Hubmaier (1480/5-1528 changed from 1480/2 in Vol. 10

                                                   1480/5 in Vol. 4)

Erasmus

Andreas Bodenstein von Karlstadt (1486-1541)

Erasmus

Zwingli

Brenz

Erasmus Sarcerius (1501-1559)

Sarcerius

Luther

 

For more on sources see the Appendix file.  A complete set of Personal Notes, dating from the Fifteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time, July 14, 2002 to the present, is on the web site at www.western-civilization.com/CBQ/Personal%20Notes. 

 

 

 

The Responsorial Antiphon for this Sunday is If today you hear his voice, harden not your hearts (Psalm 90:8).[34]

 

In the gobbledygook prayer at Sunday Mass immediately following the forgiveness of sins, the Faithful hearing the 2011 Roman Missal can listen for “draw near to your servants, O Lord.”[35]  For a more thorough examination of the illiterate 2011 Roman Missal, go to 1610 Missal:  Thirty-fourth Sunday in Ordinary Time 121125.pdf/htm at http://www.western-civilization.com/CBQ/Personal%20Notes/Personal%20Notes.htm.

 

This is a call for grace that some Black Baptists bring to mind with Therefore we are buried with him by baptism into death:  that like as Christ was raised up from the dead by the glory of the Father, even so we also should walk in newness of life (Romans 6:4).[36] 

 

Addenda

 

 

Personal Notes has been wary of Raymond Arroyo, host of “the World Over, on the Eternal Word Television Network, EWTN, attacking Pope Francis.  Personal Notes has watched for various Papal policies, like anything possibly construed as positive for Democrats, that Arroyo might systematically attack.  Nothing seemed to fall into place until a better realization of what the “Papal Posse,” with Robert Royal, a journalist, and Father Gerald Murray, a canon lawyer, means.  The Posse is out to find and attack Pope Francis, and this on a Catholic network.  This fell into place at the program Thursday, June 25, 2016.  EWTN represents the stand of the United States Catholic Conference of Bishops (USCCB).

 

On Thursday, June 30, Arroyo kept up his disparagement of Pope Francis, implicitly comparing him to Donald Trump, speaking before thinking through what he is saying.  This time Arroyo used Monsignor Charles Pope of the Washington, D.C. Diocese and Mercedes Schlapp, a Fox News conservative contributor.  They criticized Pope Francis for encourage study of female Deacons and denouncing sticking noses into the business of other people, implicitly about sexual orientation.  Monsignor said he was in a bind, caught between leaving people alone and ensuring their sexual relations were right, before the Lord.  Sexual relations is my term, a term Monsignor implied, but did not use.  I had never heard of Schlapp before.

 

I have already read every article cited in the Catholic Biblical Quarterly.  At this stage I only read unread book reviews there.  Traditionally Theological Studies articles have been more helpful to my prayer life, but, if I have already read the article, I will cite it without annotation.  I cite the Reformation Commentary on Scripture in a similar way.

 

I intend to begin catching up on material postponed while recovering from the transition of ourselves from Virginia to Ohio and Marty into the next life.  If I ever get three months out, again, I then intend to reevaluate the amount of energy placed into Personal Notes each week.

 

 



[1] Kevin W. Irwin, The Sacraments:  Historical Foundations and Liturgical Theology (New York:  Paulist Press, 2016) 114.

 

[2] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 75, No. 1 (January 2013) 110.

 

[3] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 77, No. 2 (April 2015) 259.

 

[4] The Roman Ritual: Revised by Decree of the Second Vatican Ecumenical Council and Published by Authority of Pope Paul VI: Pastoral Care of the Sick: Rites of Anointing and Viaticum: Approved for use in the dioceses of the United States of America by the National Conference of Catholic Bishops and Confirmed by the Apostolic See: Prepared by International Commission on English in the Liturgy: A Joint Commission of Catholic Bishops’ Conferences (New York: Catholic Book Publishing Co. 1983) 294.

 

[5] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 77, No. 2 (April 2015) 259.

 

[6] Robert J. Edmonson, CJ, (translator) (Brewster, Massachusetts: Paraclete Press, 2006) 231.

 

[7] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament III:  Luke, Beth Kreitzer (ed.), general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2015:  ISBN 978-0-8308-2014 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 15) 412, fn. 29.

 

[8] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 78, No. 1 (January 2016) 175.

 

[9] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 77, No. 2 (April 2015) 371.

 

[10] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 76, No. 2 (April 2014) 375.

 

[11] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament XI:  Philippians, Colossians, Graham Tomlin (ed.) in collaboration with Gregory B. Graybill, general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2013: ISBN 978-0-8308-2974-3 (P 1 Y 13) 207-224.

 

[12] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament XI:  Philippians, Colossians, Graham Tomlin (ed.) in collaboration with Gregory B. Graybill, general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2013: ISBN 978-0-8308-2974-3 (P 1 Y 13) 100, fn. 42.

 

[13] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament VI:  Acts, Esther Chung-Kim and Todd R. Hains (eds.), general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2014:  ISBN 978-0-8308-2969-9 (print) P 1 Y 14) 99, fn. 6.

 

[14] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament IV:  John 1—12, Craig S. Farmer (ed.), general editor, Timothy George, Associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch (ed.), (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2014, ISBN 978 0 8308-2967-5 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 14) 196, fn. 8.

 

[15] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament III:  Luke, Beth Kreitzer (ed.), general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2015:  ISBN 978-0-8308-2014 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 15) 269, fn. 13.

 

[16] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament XI:  Philippians, Colossians, Graham Tomlin (ed.) in collaboration with Gregory B. Graybill, general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2013: ISBN 978-0-8308-2974-3 (P 1 Y 13) 188. fn. 34.

 

[17] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament VI:  Acts, Esther Chung-Kim and Todd R. Hains (eds.), general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2014:  ISBN 978-0-8308-2969-9 (print) P 1 Y 14) 146, fn. 23.

 

[18] In Scott H. Hendrix, ed. and trans., Early Protestant Spirituality (New York, Mahwah: Paulist Press, 2009) 130.

 

[19] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  Old Testament VII:  Psalms 1—72, Timothy George (ed.), general editor, Scot M. Manetsch, Associate General editor, Herman J. Selderhuis (ed.), (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2015, ISBN 978 0 8308-2957-6 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 15) 368, fn. 14.

 

[20] In Scott H. Hendrix, ed. and trans., Early Protestant Spirituality (New York, Mahwah: Paulist Press, 2009) 146.

 

[21] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament III:  Luke, Beth Kreitzer (ed.), general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2015:  ISBN 978-0-8308-2014 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 15) 62.

 

[22] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  Old Testament V:  1-2 Samuel, 1-2 Kings, 1-2 Chronicles, Timothy George (ed.), general editor, Scot M. Manetsch, Associate General editor, Derek Cooper and Martin J. Lohrmann (ed.), (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2016, ISBN 978 0 8308-29552 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 16) 195, fn. 15.

 

[23] Theological Studies, Vol. 76, No. 4 (December 2015) 703.

 

[24] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament VI:  Acts, Esther Chung-Kim and Todd R. Hains (eds.), general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2014:  ISBN 978-0-8308-2969-9 (print) P 1 Y 14) 44, fn. 1.

 

[25] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  Old Testament V:  1-2 Samuel, 1-2 Kings, 1-2 Chronicles, Timothy George (ed.), general editor, Scot M. Manetsch, Associate General editor, Derek Cooper and Martin J. Lohrmann (ed.), (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2016, ISBN 978 0 8308-29552 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 16) 293, fn. 5.

 

[26] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 75, No. 4 (October 2013) 818.

 

[27] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 76, No. 1 (January 2014) 84. 85.

 

[28] Collegeville, Minnesota:  Liturgical Press, 2013, 88, 89

 

[29] In Scott H. Hendrix, ed. and trans., Early Protestant Spirituality (New York, Mahwah: Paulist Press, 2009) 177

 

[30] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 78, No. 1 (January 2016) 163.

 

[31] Grand Rapids: Michigan: Zondervan, 1996, 478, 650.

 

[32] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 78, No. 2 (April 2016) 302, 320.

 

[33] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament III:  Luke, Beth Kreitzer (ed.), general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2015:  ISBN 978-0-8308-2014 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 15) 260-263.

 

[34] National Conference of Catholic Bishops, The Roman Missal Restored by Decree of the Second Ecumenical Council of the Vatican and Promulgated by Authority of Pope Paul VI: Lectionary for Mass:  For Use in the Dioceses of the United States of America:  Second Typical Edition:  Volume I:  Sundays, Solemnities, Feasts of the Lord and the Saints (Collegeville, Minnesota:  The Liturgical Press, 1988) 751.  Personal Notes refers to this book as the Lectionary.

 

[35] n.a., The Roman Missal:  Renewed by Decree of the Most Holy Second Ecumenical Council of the Vatican, Promulgated by Authority of Pope Paul VI and Revised at the Direction of Pope John Paul II:  English Translation According to the Third Typical Edition:  For Use in the Dioceses of the United States of America:  Approved by the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops and Confirmed by the Apostolic See (Washington, DC, United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, 2011) 478.  Personal Notes refers to this book as the Missal.

 

[36] UMI Annual Sunday School Lesson Commentary:  Precepts for Living ®: 2013-2014:  International Sunday School Lessons:  Volume 165:  UMI (Urban Ministries, Inc.), a. Okechuku Ogbonnaya, Ph.D., (ed.) (Chicago, IL  60643: UMI (Urban Ministries, Inc.), 2013) 510-511.