Due to greater responsiveness at the National Catholic Reporter blog, beginning with the Fourth Sunday in Lent, Reading 032B, March 15, 2015, my interest began shifting from annotating my index here, to engaging conversation there.  I may keep up the Bibliography, but without further comment.  Time will tell.

 

The Raymond Arroyo “The World Over,” shows on EWTN uses fear-mongering, rather than the Joy of the Gospel to entrance its viewers.  In the past, Arroyo has responded to my concerns, particularly the Reverend Robert A. Sirico, who rarely appears anymore, with his drivel.  Beginning May 3, I intend to begin pointing out the role fear, rather than joy has in “The World Over.”

 

The Encore show, May 1, 2015, used the word frightening at least one time in reference to the earthquake in Nepal.  The show used the word afraid at least twice, once over losing tax-exempt status while fighting same sex marriage and once concerning the plight of Christians in Syria.  This approach to “News the World Over” contradicts the Responsorial Antiphon for this Sunday, Give thanks to the Lord, his love is everlasting (Psalm 107:1b).[1]

 

The joy of the Easter season is more appropriate than fear-mongering.  The following questions may have been addressed:  How were Nepal Christians faring?  How brave were Syrian Christians proving to be in the face of Isis?  How forthright are tax-exempt Catholics in the United States opposing same-sex marriage in the context of tax policies?  In a word, just how meaningful is the joy of the Resurrection in the context of worldly Christian challenges?

 

 

Readings

First Reading:                   Job 38:1, 8-11

Responsorial Psalm:          Psalm 107:23-24, 25-26, 28-29, 30-31 (1b)

Second Reading               2 Corinthians 5:14-17

Alleluia                              Luke 7:16

Gospel:                             Mark 4:35-41

 

Bibliography

Job 38:1, 8-11

Job 38:8

Samantha Joo, “Job, the Biblical Atlas”[2]

 

 

Job 38:1-38

Joseph F. Wimmer, O.S.A., review of Roger Marcel Wanke, Praesentia Dei:  Die Vorstellungen von der Gegenwart Gottes im Hiobbuch[3]

 

 

Psalm 107:23-24, 25-26, 28-29, 30-31 (1b)

 

 

2 Corinthians 5:14-17

2 Cor 5:14-21

Russell Morton, Kar Yong Lim, “The Sufferings of Christ Are Abundant in Us” (2 Corinthians 1:5):  A Narrative Dynamics Investigation of Paul’s Suffering in 2 Corinthians[4]

 

 

2 Cor 5:17

James W. Thompson, “The New Is Better:  A Neglected Aspect of the Hermeneutics of Hebrews”[5]

 

 

2 Cor 5:17

Dustin W. Ellington, review of Thomas Stegman, S.J., Second Corinthians[6]

 

 

2 Cor 5:16

Alexandra R. Brown, review of Michael Lakey, Image and Glory of God:  1 Corinthians 11:2-16 as a Case Study in Bible, gender and Hermeneutics[7]

 

 

2 Cor 5:17

Harvey D. Egan, S.J., “In Purgatory We Shall All Be Mystics”[8]

 

 

2 Cor 5:14

David G. Schultenover, S.J., “From the Editor’s Desk”[9]

 

 

2 Cor 5:16

Teresa Kuo-Yu Tsui, “Reconsidering Pauline Juxtaposition of Indicative and Imperative (Romans 6:1-14) in Light of Pauline Apocalypticism”[10]

 

 

2 Cor 5:14

Scott D. Mackie, “The Two Tables of the Law and Paul’s Ethical Methodology in 1 Corinthians 6:12-20 and 10:23—11:1”[11]

 

 

2 Cor 5:17

Thomas Hughson, S.J., “Creation as an Ecumenical Problem:  Renewed belief through Green Experience”[12]

 

 

2 Cor 5:16

Matthew W. Bates, “A Christology of Incarnation and Enthronement:  Romans 1:3-4 as Unified, Nonadoptionist, and Nonconciliatory”[13]

 

 

2 Corinthians 5:14-15

Anscar J. Chupungco, “The ICEL2010 Translation”[14]

 

 

2 Corinthians 5:14

Kaspar Olevianus (1536-1587), “Sermons on Galatians”[15]

 

 

2 Cor 5:14

Pope Francis, The Joy of the Gospel[16]

 

 

2 Corinthians 5:14

Daniel B. Wallace, With Scripture, Subject, and Greek Word Indexes: Greek Grammar:  Beyond the Basics: An Exegetical Syntax of the New Testament[17]

 

 

2 Corinthians 5:15

Gilbert Ostdiek, “The ICEL2010 Translation”[18]

 

 

Luke 7:16

 

 

Mark 4:35-41

As of May 3, 2015, this book is packed for a move to Vermilion, Ohio.  I hope to add what Comfort contains the next time through.

Philip W. Comfort, New Testament Text and Translation Commentary:  Commentary on the variant readings of the ancient New Testament manuscripts and how they relate to the major English translations[19]

 

 

Mark 4:1-34

John P. Meier, “Is Luke’s Version of the Parable of the Rich Fool Reflected in the Coptic Gospel of Thomas?”[20]

 

 

Mark 4:35-41

Fr. Yozefu – B. Ssemakula, The Healing of Families:  How To Pray Effectively for Those Stubborn Personal and Familial Problems[21]

 

 

Mark 4:35-41

Steven L. Bridge, review of John Killinger, Hidden Mark:  Exploring Christianity’s Heretical Gospel[22]

 

 

Mark 4:35-41

C. Clifton Black, review of Wendy J. Cotter, C.S.J., The Christ of Miracle Stories:  Portrait through Encounter[23]

 

 

Mark 4:35-41

Alicia Batten, review of Chantal Reynier, Tempêtes: L’homme, la nature, la mort[24]

 

 

Mark 4:39

Robyn Whitaker, “Rebuke or Recall?  Rethinking the Role of Peter in Mark’s Gospel”[25]

 

 

Mark 5:30

Sherry A. Weddell, Forming Intentional Disciples:  The Path to Knowing and Following Jesus[26]

 

 

Mark 35:41

St. Thérèse of Lisieux, The Story of a Soul:  A New Translation[27]

 

 

On April 7, 2013, with Reading 045C 2nd Sunday of Easter_A Catholic Bible Study 130407, Personal Notes systematically began to incorporate material from A Commentary on the Order of Mass of The Roman Missal:  A New English Translation:  Developed under the Auspices of the Catholic Academy of Liturgy, Edward Foley (ed.) (Collegeville, Minnesota:  Liturgical Press, 2011).  The hope is that this approach will help pray with the new Missal, despite itself.

 

For more on sources see the Appendix file.  A complete set of Personal Notes, dating from the Fifteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time, July 14, 2002 to the present, is on the web site at www.western-civilization.com/CBQ/Personal%20Notes. 

 

 

 

In the gobbledygook prayer at Sunday Mass immediately following the forgiveness of sins, the Faithful hearing the 2011 Roman Missal can listen for “that we may always revere and love your holy name.”[28]  The Responsorial Antiphon for this Sunday is Give thanks to the Lord, his love is everlasting (Psalm 107:1b).[29]  Between November 25, 2011 and November 25, 2012, Personal Notes systematically examined the illiterate 2011 Missal.  For an unknown reason April 26, 2015 a more thorough examination of the illiterate 2011 Roman Missal, has not been developed to go with this Sunday.

 

 

 

This is a call for grace that some Black Baptists bring to mind with ?? Baptist Urban Ministries, Inc.,[30]  As of May 3, 2015, this book is packed for a move to Vermilion, Ohio.  I hope to add what Urban Ministries contains the next time through.

 

 



[1] National Conference of Catholic Bishops, The Roman Missal Restored by Decree of the Second Ecumenical Council of the Vatican and Promulgated by Authority of Pope Paul VI: Lectionary for Mass:  For Use in the Dioceses of the United States of America:  Second Typical Edition:  Volume I:  Sundays, Solemnities, Feasts of the Lord and the Saints (Collegeville, Minnesota:  The Liturgical Press, 1988) 654-655.  Personal Notes refers to this book as the Lectionary.

 

[2] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 74, No. 1 January 2012) 78.

 

[3] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 77, No. 2 (April 2015) 358.

 

[4] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 73, No. 2 (April 2011) 398.

 

[5] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 73, No. 3 (July 2011) 549.

 

[6] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 74, No. 2 (January 2012) 401.

 

[7] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 74, No. 4 (October 2012) 820.

 

[8] Theological Studies, Vol. 73, No. 4 (December 2012) 885.

 

[9] Theological Studies, Vol. 74, No. 1 (March 2013) 2.

 

[10] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 75, No. 2 (April 2013) 309.

 

[11] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 75, No. 2 (April 2013) 325.

 

[12] Theological Studies, Vol. 75, No. 4 (December 2014) 823.

 

[13] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 77, No. 1 (January 2015) 122.

 

[14] in A Commentary on the Order of Mass of The Roman Missal:  A New English Translation:  Developed under the Auspices of the Catholic Academy of Liturgy, Edward Foley (ed.) (Collegeville, Minnesota:  Liturgical Press, 2011) 330 fn. 14.

 

[15] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament X: Galatians, Ephesians, (ed.) Gerald L. Bray (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic, An Imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2011) 201 fn. 8.

 

[16] Erlanger, Kentucky:  Libreria Editrice Vaticana, DynamicCatholic.com, 2014, 13.

 

[17] Grand Rapids: Michigan: Zondervan, 1996, 120, 121, 383, 387, 459

 

[18] in A Commentary on the Order of Mass of The Roman Missal:  A New English Translation:  Developed under the Auspices of the Catholic Academy of Liturgy, Edward Foley (ed.) (Collegeville, Minnesota:  Liturgical Press, 2011) 420.

 

[19] Carol Stream, Illinois:  Tyndale House Publishers, Inc., 2008,

 

[20] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 74, No. 3 (July 2012) 534.

 

[21] [no publisher or place of publication is listed] www.healingoffamilies.com, 2012, 69.

 

[22] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 74, No. 1 (January 2012) 161.

 

[23] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 74, No. 4 (October 2012) 811.

 

[24] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 74, No. 4 (October 2012) 826.

 

[25] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 75, No. 4 (October 2013) 671.

 

[26] Huntington, Indiana 46750:  Our Sunday Visitor, Inc., Our Sunday Visitor Publishing Division, 2012, 147.

 

[27] Robert J. Edmonson, CJ, (translator) (Brewster, Massachusetts: Paraclete Press, 2006) 119, 184, 243.

 

[28] n.a., The Roman Missal:  Renewed by Decree of the Most Holy Second Ecumenical Council of the Vatican, Promulgated by Authority of Pope Paul VI and Revised at the Direction of Pope John Paul II:  English Translation According to the Third Typical Edition:  For Use in the Dioceses of the United States of America:  Approved by the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops and Confirmed by the Apostolic See (Washington, DC, United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, 2011) 472.  Personal Notes refers to this book as the Missal.

 

[29] National Conference of Catholic Bishops, The Roman Missal Restored by Decree of the Second Ecumenical Council of the Vatican and Promulgated by Authority of Pope Paul VI: Lectionary for Mass:  For Use in the Dioceses of the United States of America:  Second Typical Edition:  Volume I:  Sundays, Solemnities, Feasts of the Lord and the Saints (Collegeville, Minnesota:  The Liturgical Press, 1988) 654-655.  Personal Notes refers to this book as the Lectionary.

 

[30] UMI Annual Sunday School Lesson Commentary:  Precepts for Living ®: 2013-2014:  International Sunday School Lessons:  Volume 165:  UMI (Urban Ministries, Inc.), a. Okechuku Ogbonnaya, Ph.D., (ed.) (Chicago, IL  60643: UMI (Urban Ministries, Inc.), 2013) .