Readings from the Liturgy of the Word are dear to this historian, beginning with his anger lasts but a moment; a lifetime, his good will (Psalm 30:6); and then after three years I went up to Jerusalem to confer with Cephas and remained with him for fifteen days (Galatians 11:18).  The proper function of an historian is to build identity within a context of theology.  Far from being limited to theological communities, the historian properly deals with all things humans have ever said and done.  In other words, it is proper for an historian to help others see just who they are. 

 

That is why Personal Notes finds Raymond Arroyo and the Eternal Word Television Network (EWTN) difficult, because of its narrowness.  Personal Notes is of the generation open to new ideas, ready to baptize them into Roman Catholic Catholicism.  EWTN and its ilk make this readiness more difficult than is necessary.

 

 

Readings

First Reading                     1 Kings 17:17-24

Psalm:                              Psalm 30:2, 4, 5-6, 11, 12, 13 (2a)

Second Reading                Galatians 1:11-19

Alleluia Verse                    Luke 7:16

Gospel:                             Luke 7:11-17

 

Annotated Bibliography

Musings above the solid line draw from material below.  Those disinterested in scholarly and tangential details should stop reading here.  If they do, however, they may miss some interesting prayer-provoking details.

 

 

1 Kings 17:17-24

1 Kings 17:17-24

Urbanus Rhegius, “Apothecary of the Soul for the Healthy and the Sick in These Dangerous Times, 1529”[1]

 

 

Psalm 30:2, 4, 5-6, 11, 12, 13 (2a)

Psalm 30:12 exhibits sloppy scholarship, because verse 12 is incomplete.

 

Psalm 30: 2, 4, 5-6, 11, 12, 13[2]

Rudolf Gwalther (1519-1586), “The Psalter”

 

John Calvin (1509-1564), “Commentary on the Psalms”

 

David Dickson (1583?-1663), “Commentary on Psalm 30”

 

Hieronymus Weller von Molsdorf (1499-1572), “Brief Comment on Psalm 30”

 

Jacob Arminius (1559-1609), “Disputation 4:  On the Nature God”

 

Calvin, “Commentary on the Psalms”

 

Martin Luther (1483-1546), “Glossa on Psalm 30 (1513-1515)”

 

Weller, “Brief Comment on Psalm 30”

 

Calvin, “Commentary on the Psalms”

 

Cardinal Cajetan (1469-1534), “Commentary on Psalm 30”

 

Luther, “First Lectures (1513-1515)”

 

Moïse Amyraut (1596-1664), “Annotations on Psalm 30:9”

 

Calvin, “Commentary on the Psalms”

 

Philipp Melanchthon (1497-1560), “Comments on the Psalms”

 

Calvin, “Commentary on the Psalms”

 

Tilemann Hesshus (1527-1588), “Commentary on Psalm 30”

 


 

Psalm 30:4

Frank J. Matera, The Sermon on the Mount:  The Perfect Measure of the Christian Life[3]

 

 

Psalm 30:5, 11

Henry Airay (c. 1560-1616), “Lectures on Philippians 1:6”[4]

 

 

Psalm 30:6-7b

Johann Baumgart (Pomarius) (1514-1578), “Gospel on the Fourth Sunday After Epiphany”[5]

 

 

Galatians 1:11-19

Galatians 1:11-12

Urbanus Rhegius, “A Guide to Preaching about the Chief Topics of Christian Doctrine Carefully and without Giving Offense, for Young Ministers of the Word in the Duchy of Lüneburg, 1535”[6]

 

 

Galatians 1:11-12

Johann Spangenberg (1484-1550), “Brief Exegesis of Acts 9:9”[7]

 

 

Gal 1:13-14

Georges Massinelli, O.F.M., “Christ and the Law in Romans 10:4”[8]

 

 

Galatians 1:14

Luther, “Commentary on Galatians 1:14”[9]

 

 

Gal 1:14

Benjamin J. Lappenga, “`Zealots for Good Works’:  The Polemical Repercussions of the Word zhlwthV in Titus 2:14”[10]

 

 

Galatians 1:14

Martin Luther (1483-1546), “Table Talk, Konrad Cordatus (1531)”[11]

 

 


 

Gal 1:14

Paula Fredriksen, review of N. T. Wright, Paul and the Faithfulness of God[12]

This is the best refutation I have seen of Wright.  To the point of the readings this Sunday, Fredriksen reports,

 

Zealously persecuting other Jews who did not seek to meet such exacting standards was thus naturally part of the Pharisaic modus operandi (alluding to Gal 1:14); so were erecting and maintaining a “wall” between “God’s people and the idolatrous pagan world” (p. 194).  Small wonder that the nations were not turning to Israel’s god. 

 

In the larger academic context, Fredriksen concludes,

 

W.’s book is historically important, therefore, for the light it sheds not on Paul but on the last century of Pauline studies.  We have not, after all, undergone a paradigm shift.  We stand transfixed between two paradigms:  Paul the Christian theologian and Paul the apocalyptic visionary.  The next step forward still remains to be taken.

 

I like Paul the apocalyptic visionary, mainly for its independence of the pastoral restrictions of the hierarchical Church.

 

Galatians 1:15-16

Luther, “House Postil for the Feast of Saint Stephen (1544)”[13]

 

 


 

Gal 1:16

Vincent M. Smiles, review of Gerry Schoberg, Perspectives of Jesus in the Writings of Paul:  A Historical Examination of Shared Core Commitments with a View to Determining the Extent of Paul’s Dependence on Jesus[14]

Smiles concludes whether “Paul was the real founder of Christianity . . . “ is still “a central issue of NT study.”  This matter arises in the National Catholic Reporter blog.  Schoberg denies Paul the real founder of Christianity.

 

Relative to this Sunday, Smiles reports,

 

“following the example of Jesus welcoming tax collectors and sinners” (p. 117).  Paul adopted this practice during the time he was integrated into the church of Antioch, and it was this that caused him later to see his conversion as being specifically `for the Gentiles’ (Gal 1:16).  Not all will agree with the details of S.’s argument . . . but overall S. establishes the case for Paul’s dependence on Jesus in this `core commitment.’

 

Gal 1:16

Benedict T. Viviano, O.P., review of J. Andrew Doole, What Was Mark for Matthew?[15]

Viviano remains unconvinced by Doole that Matthew is simply a new edition of Mark.

 

Galatians 1:17-18

The English Annotations (1645, 1651, 1657), “Annotations on Acts 9:26”[16]

 

 

Gal 1:17-18

Robyn Whitaker, “Rebuke or Recall?  Rethinking the Role of Peter in Mark’s Gospel”[17]

 

 

Gal 1:18

Brendan Byrne, S.J., review of Francis J. Moloney, S.D.B., The Resurrection of the Messiah:  A Narrative Commentary on the Resurrection Accounts in the Four Gospels[18]

 

 

Gal 1:19

Stephen C. Carlson, “The Davidic Key for Counting the Generations in Matthew 1:17”[19]

 

 

Luke 7:16

 

 

Luke 7:11-17

Luke 7:12

Daniel B. Wallace, With Scripture, Subject, and Greek Word Indexes: Greek Grammar:  Beyond the Basics: An Exegetical Syntax of the New Testament[20]

 

 

Luke 7:13

Sigurd Grindheim, review of Stephen Voorwinde, Jesus’ Emotions in the Gospels[21]

 

 


 

Luke 7:13

Stephen Finlan, review of Richard B. Hays, Reading Backwards:  Figural Christology and the Fourfold Gospel Witness[22]

Finlan reports, Luke has been inaccurately described as having a low christology, when in fact he applies to Jesus some passages about the God of Israel . . . and has Jesus called `Lord’ ( . . . Luke 7:13 . . . ) Luke puts more emphasis on `promises and fulfillment’ and on `a grateful reception’ by believers than does Matthew (p. 99).”

 

Luke 7:16

Kindalee Pfremmer De Long, review of Geir Otto Holomås, Prayer and Vindication in Luke-Acts:  The Theme of Prayer within the Context of the Legitimating and Edifying Objective of the Lukan Narrative[23]

 

 

Luke 7:16

Brian J. Tabb, “Is the Lucan Jesus a `Martyr’?  A Critical Assessment of a Scholarly Consensus”[24]

 

 

Luke 7:16

Johannes Bugenhagen (1485-1558), “Commentary on 2 Kings”[25]

Fear seized them all, and they glorified God, exclaiming, “A great prophet has arisen in our midst,” and “God has visited his people” (Luke 7:16).  Bugenhagen applies that verse to the miracle Elisha worked furnishing oil for the widow of the prophet so that her sons would not be sold into debt slavery and they would have enough to continue. 

 

 


 

Luke 7:36

Andrés García Serrano, “Anna’s Characterization in Luke 2:36-38:  A Case of Conceptual Allusion?”[26]

 

 

For more on sources see the Appendix file.  A complete set of Personal Notes, dating from the Fifteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time, July 14, 2002 to the present, is on the web site at www.western-civilization.com/CBQ/Personal%20Notes. 

 

 

 

The Responsorial Antiphon for this Sunday is I will praise you, Lord, for you have rescued me (Psalm 30:2a).[27]

 

In the gobbledygook prayer at Sunday Mass immediately following the forgiveness of sins, the Faithful hearing the 2011 Roman Missal can listen for “O God, from whom all good things come.”[28]  For a more thorough examination of the illiterate 2011 Roman Missal, go to 1610 Missal:  Thirty-fourth Sunday in Ordinary Time 121125.pdf/htm at http://www.western-civilization.com/CBQ/Personal%20Notes/Personal%20Notes.htm.

 

This is a call for grace that some Black Baptists bring to mind with Seek ye the LORD, all ye meek of the earth, which have wrought his judgment, seek righteousness, seek meekness:  it may be ye shall be hid in the day of the LORD’s anger (Zephaniah 2:3).[29] 

 

Addenda

 

By July 31, 2015, I had identified a pattern of attack on Pope Francis by Raymond Arroyo in the Eternal Word Television Network (EWTN).  The attack is on what the Pope is preaching about climate change and capitalism.  In the United States Republicans have firm opposition to such sermonizing, as the forthcoming campaign for the Republican nomination for President will show . . . or not.

 

I have already read every article cited in the Catholic Biblical Quarterly.  At this stage I only read unread book reviews there.  Traditionally Theological Studies articles have been more helpful to my prayer life, but, if I have already read the article, I will cite it without annotation. 

 

I intend to begin catching up on material postponed while recovering from the transition of ourselves from Virginia to Ohio and Marty into the next life.  If I ever get three months out, again, I then intend to reevaluate the amount of energy placed into Personal Notes each week.

 

 



[1] In Scott H. Hendrix, ed. and trans., Early Protestant Spirituality (New York, Mahwah: Paulist Press, 2009) 128.

 

[2] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  Old Testament VII:  Psalms 1—72, Timothy George (ed.), general editor, Scot M. Manetsch, Associate General editor, Herman J. Selderhuis (ed.), (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2015, ISBN 978 0 8308-2957-6 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 15) 231-235.

 

[3] Collegeville, Minnesota:  Liturgical Press, 2013, 77.

 

[4] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament VI:  Acts, Esther Chung-Kim and Todd R. Hains (eds.), general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2014:  ISBN 978-0-8308-2969-9 (print) P 1 Y 14) 11, fn. 8.

 

[5] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament III:  Luke, Beth Kreitzer (ed.), general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2015:  ISBN 978-0-8308-2014 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 15) 178, fn. 4.

 

[6] In Scott H. Hendrix, ed. and trans., Early Protestant Spirituality (New York, Mahwah: Paulist Press, 2009) 307, fn. 2, referenced on 77.

 

[7] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament VI:  Acts, Esther Chung-Kim and Todd R. Hains (eds.), general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2014:  ISBN 978-0-8308-2969-9 (print) P 1 Y 14) 123, fn. 18.

 

[8] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 77, No. 4 (July 2015) 721.

 

[9] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament VI:  Acts, Esther Chung-Kim and Todd R. Hains (eds.), general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2014:  ISBN 978-0-8308-2969-9 (print) P 1 Y 14) 79.

 

[10] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 75, No. 4 (October 2013) 716.

 

[11] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament VI:  Acts, Esther Chung-Kim and Todd R. Hains (eds.), general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2014:  ISBN 978-0-8308-2969-9 (print) P 1 Y 14) 218, fn. 2.

 

[12] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 77, No. 2 (April 2015) 389.

 

[13] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament VI:  Acts, Esther Chung-Kim and Todd R. Hains (eds.), general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2014:  ISBN 978-0-8308-2969-9 (print) P 1 Y 14) 102, fn. 18.

 

[14] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 77, No. 3 (July 2015) 567.

 

[15] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 76, No. 4 (October 2014) 763.

 

[16] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament VI:  Acts, Esther Chung-Kim and Todd R. Hains (eds.), general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2014:  ISBN 978-0-8308-2969-9 (print) P 1 Y 14) 127, fn. 3.

 

[17] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 75, No. 4 (October 2013) 679.

 

[18] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 77, No. 3 (July 2015) 564.

 

[19] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 76, No. 4 (October 2014) 682.

 

[20] Grand Rapids: Michigan: Zondervan, 1996, 148.

 

[21] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 75, No. 3 (July 2013) 599.

 

[22] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 78, No. 1 (January 2016) 163-164.

 

[23] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 76, No. 1 (January 2014) 139.

 

[24] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 77, No. 2 (April 2015) 298.

 

[25] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  Old Testament V:  1-2 Samuel, 1-2 Kings, 1-2 Chronicles, Timothy George (ed.), general editor, Scot M. Manetsch, Associate General editor, Derek Cooper and Martin J. Lohrmann (ed.), (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2016, ISBN 978 0 8308-29552 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 16) 415, fn. 1.

 

[26] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 76, No. 3 (July 2014) 475.

 

[27] National Conference of Catholic Bishops, The Roman Missal Restored by Decree of the Second Ecumenical Council of the Vatican and Promulgated by Authority of Pope Paul VI: Lectionary for Mass:  For Use in the Dioceses of the United States of America:  Second Typical Edition:  Volume I:  Sundays, Solemnities, Feasts of the Lord and the Saints (Collegeville, Minnesota:  The Liturgical Press, 1988) 631.  Personal Notes refers to this book as the Lectionary.

 

[28] n.a., The Roman Missal:  Renewed by Decree of the Most Holy Second Ecumenical Council of the Vatican, Promulgated by Authority of Pope Paul VI and Revised at the Direction of Pope John Paul II:  English Translation According to the Third Typical Edition:  For Use in the Dioceses of the United States of America:  Approved by the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops and Confirmed by the Apostolic See (Washington, DC, United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, 2011) 470.  Personal Notes refers to this book as the Missal.

 

[29] UMI Annual Sunday School Lesson Commentary:  Precepts for Living ®: 2013-2014:  International Sunday School Lessons:  Volume 165:  UMI (Urban Ministries, Inc.), a. Okechuku Ogbonnaya, Ph.D., (ed.) (Chicago, IL  60643: UMI (Urban Ministries, Inc.), 2013) 434-435.