As the Faithful get ready for Lent, Raymond Arroyo continues to attack the Papacy of Pope Francis.  This time the program aired January 21.  The problem was washing feet.  Arroyo pointed out the Pope was not following the rite as prescribed.  The Pope only changed the rite, after he performed it.  I wonder whether Mother Angelica is aware of such sniping.

 

Ann Hunt helps the Faithful understand Vatican II.  I have been quoting Hunt for National Catholic Reporter bloggers and offer here something from her essay to help the Faithful pray in the context of the Arroyo current attack on the Papacy.[1]

 

This appreciation (of the Church as Mystery) also prompts a sense of ecclesial humility (the self-righteousness of Arroyo and his guests is off-putting) in the realization that the church is not immune to criticism or reproach (for example the ongoing sexual cover-ups).  UR (the Decree on Ecumenism), for example, speaks of the church as summoned by Christ “to continual reformation, of which it is always in need,” and that, if there have been deficiencies in moral conduct (even by the Papacy), church discipline, or the formulation of church teaching, “these should be set right in the proper way at the opportune moment (whatever that may mean in the current monarchial structure of church governance).  UR also speaks of a kind of fraternal rivalry among separated Christians by means of which all will be stirred to “a deeper awareness and a clearer manifestation of the unfathomable riches of Christ.

 

There is a self-contradictory problem here making it difficult for the Faithful to join in the Responsorial Antiphon, “In the sight of the angels I will sing your praises, Lord” (Psalm 138:1c).  On the one hand Hunt seems to legitimize Arroyo criticizing the Papacy, on the other hand I find Arroyo carping about the Papacy and forever putting down Democrats illegitimate.

 

 

Material above the solid line draws from material below the solid line.  Those uninterested in scholarly and tangential details should stop reading here.  If they do, however, they may miss some interesting material.


 

 

Readings

First Reading:                    Isa 6:1-2 a, 3-8

Responsorial Psalm:          Psalm 138:1-2, 2-3, 4-5, 7-8 (1 c)

Second Reading:               1 Corinthians 15:1-11

Alleluia:                             Matthew 4:19

Gospel:                             Luke 5:1-11

 

Bibliography

Isa 6:1-2 a, 3-8

Isa 6:3

Irene Nowell, O.S.B., review of Max Stern, Bible and Music:  Influences of the Old Testament on Western Music[2]

Outstanding correlation between books of the Bible and musical compositions derived therefrom.

 

Isaiah 6:5

Kaspar Olevianus (1536-1587),[3] “Notes on Colossians 1:15”

 

 

Isa 6:6-7

John W. Martens, “Burning Questions in Romans 12:20:  What Is the Meaning and Purpose of `Coals of Fire’?”[4]

 

 

Psalm 138:1-2, 2-3, 4-5, 7-8 (1 c)

Psalm 138:4-5

Erik M. Heen, review of James P. Ware, Paul and the Mission of the Church:  Philippians in Ancient Jewish Context[5]

 

 

Psalm 138:8

John Calvin (1509-1564,[6] “Commentary on Acts 20:32”

 

 

1 Corinthians 15:1-11

Corinthians 15:1-4 is used in Pastoral Care of the Sick, Part III: Readings, Responses, and Verses from Sacred Scripture, New Testament Readings, L For the dying.[7]  

 

 

1 Cor 15:3-5

Richard J. Dillon, “Mark 1:1-15:  `New Evangelization’?”[8]

 

 

1 Corinthians 15:3

“Encyclical Letter Lumen Fidei of the Supreme Pontiff Francis to the Bishops, Priests, and deacons [sic] and lay Faithful on Faith”[9]

 

 


 

1 Cor 15:3-5

Matthew W. Bates, “A Christology of Incarnation and Enthronement:  Romans 1:3-4 as Unified, Nonadoptionist, and Nonconciliatory”[10]

 

 

1 Cor 15:3b-5

Timothy Milinovich, review of Petr Pokorný, From the Gospel to the Gospels:  History, Theology and Impact of the Biblical Term `Euangelion’[11]

Milinovich regards the topic as important, but the book less so, mainly because of lack of documentation.

 

1 Corinthians 15:5-7

Johann Eck (1486-1543),[12] “First Sermon on the Feast of Chris’s Ascension (1531)”

 

 

1 Corinthians 15:6

The English Annotations (1645, 1651, 1657),[13] “Annotations on Acts 10:41”

 

 


 

1 Corinthians 15:8-10

Martin Luther (1483-1546),[14] “First Psalms Lectures (1513-1515)”

 

 

1 Cor 15:7

Vincent Branick, review of Sabine Bieberstein and Daniel Kosch, Paulus und die Anfänge der Kirche[15]

The following statement is the most interesting part of the review.  “In chap. 1, for instance, B. does not adequately deal with the tension between Mark’s and Matthew’s views of all disciples gathering in Galilee at the end (Mark 167; see Matt 28:16), on the one hand, and Luke’s view of a church beginning in Jerusalem (Acts 1—7).”

 

1 Corinthians 15:8

Johann Spangenberg (1528-1604),[16] “Brief Exegesis of Acts 21:19”

 

 

1 Cor 15:9

Benedict T. Viviano, O.P., review of J. Andrew Doole, What Was Mark for Matthew?[17]

 

 

Matthew 4:19

 

 

Luke 5:1-11

Luke 5:1

Daniel B. Wallace, With Scripture, Subject, and Greek Word Indexes: Greek Grammar:  Beyond the Basics: An Exegetical Syntax of the New Testament[18]

 

 

Luke 5:1-11

Andrés García Serrano, “Anna’s Characterization in Luke 2:36-38:  A Case of Conceptual Allusion?”[19]

 

 

Luke 5:1-11

Kaspar von Schwenckfeld (1489-1561),[20] “Four Sermons on the Gospel of the Entrance of Christ into Jerusalem, Matthew 21”

Schwenckfeld preaches, “They (the disciples) do not ride alongside of Christ, but they only serve Crist in his triumphal procession, leading and pointing to Christ, praising and glorifying him, making the Lord Christ Known (as is here provided) with his grace, benefits and truth.”

 

 

Luke 5:5-10

St. Thérèse of Lisieux, The Story of a Soul:  A New Translation[21]

 

 

Luke 5:8

Harvey D. Egan, S.J., “In Purgatory We Shall All Be Mystics”

Theological Studies, Vol. 73, No. 4 (December 2012) 886.

 

 

Luke 5:10

The English Annotations (1645, 1651, 1657),[22] “Annotations upon the Gospel according to Saint Luke 5:10”

 

 

For more on sources see the Appendix file.  A complete set of Personal Notes, dating from the Fifteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time, July 14, 2002 to the present, is on the web site at www.western-civilization.com/CBQ/Personal%20Notes. 

 

 

 

In the gobbledygook prayer at Sunday Mass immediately following the Gloria, the Faithful hearing the 2011 Roman Missal can listen for “Keep your family save, O Lord.”[23]  The Responsorial Antiphon for this Sunday is In the sight of the angels I will sing your Praises, Lord.[24]  Between November 25, 2011 and November 25, 2012, Personal Notes systematically examined the illiterate 2011 Missal.  For a more thorough examination of the illiterate 2011 Roman Missal, go to 1610 Missal: Thirty-fourth Sunday in Ordinary Time 121125.pdf/htm at http://www.western-civilization.com/CBQ/Personal%20Notes/Personal%20Notes.htm.

 

 

 

This is a call for grace that some Black Baptists bring to mind with And this day shall be unto you for a memorial; and ye shall keep it a feast to the LORD throughout your generations; ye shall keep it a feast by an ordinance for ever (Exodus 12:14).[25] 

 

Addenda

 

Due to greater responsiveness at the National Catholic Reporter blog, beginning with the Fourth Sunday in Lent, Reading 032B, March 15, 2015, my interest began shifting from annotating my index here, to engaging conversation there.  I may keep up the Bibliography, but without further comment.  Time will tell.

 

Raymond Arroyo, “The World Over,” on EWTN uses fear-mongering, rather than the Joy of the Gospel to entrance its viewers.  In the past, Arroyo has responded to my concerns, particularly the Reverend Robert A. Sirico, who rarely appears anymore, with his drivel.  Beginning, May 3, 2015, I intend to begin pointing out, here, the role fear, rather than joy, has in “The World Over.”[26]

 

On October 18, 2010 the reason Sirico is not appearing may have come out.  In Washington state and Colorado in the 1970s, Sirico performed some of the first same-sex marriage ceremonies in history.”  Evidently Sirico is homosexual.[27]  For that reason, I am not expecting Sirico to appear again on the Arroyo show.

 

By July 31, I had identified a pattern of attack on Pope Francis by Arroyo.  The attack is on what the Pope is preaching about climate change and capitalism.  In the United States Republicans have firm opposition to such sermonizing, as the forthcoming campaign for the Republican nomination for President will show . . . or not.

 

As, on June 23, 2015, I prepared Reading 110B for the Seventeenth Sunday in Ordinary time for July 26, I decided to begin reading unread book reviews and articles from Theological Studies for two reasons.  The first is I have already read every article cited in the Catholic Biblical Quarterly.  The second is that traditionally Theological Studies articles have been more helpful to my prayer life.  I also began reading unread book reviews in the Biblical Quarterly and unread sections in Reformation Commentary on Scripture, viz., John and Psalms.

 

 



[1] Anne Hunt, “The Trinitarian Depths of Vatican II,” Theological Studies, Vol. 74, No. 1 (March 2013) 8-9.

 

[2] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 74, No. 4 (October 2012) 802.

 

[3] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament XI:  Philippians, Colossians, Graham Tomlin (ed.) in collaboration with Gregory B. Graybill, general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2013: ISBN 978-0-8308-2974-3 (P 1 Y 13) 152 fn. 4.

 

[4] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 76, No. 2 (April 2014) 300.

 

[5] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 75, No. 2 (April 2013) 383.

 

[6] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament VI:  Acts, Esther Chung-Kim and Todd R. Hains (eds.), general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2014:  ISBN 978-0-8308-2969-9 (print) P 1 Y 14) 286.

 

[7] International Commission on English in the Liturgy: A Joint Commission of Catholic Bishops’ Conferences, The Roman Ritual: Revised by Decree of the Second Vatican Ecumenical Council and Published by Authority of Pope Paul VI: Pastoral Care of the Sick: Rites of Anointing and Viaticum: Approved for Use in the Dioceses of the United States of America by the National Conference of Catholic Bishops and Confirmed by the Apostolic See (New York: Catholic Book Publishing Co., 1983) 2770-271.

 

[8] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 76, No. 1 (January 2014) 2.

 

[9] L’Osservatore Romano: Weekly Edition in English, Vol. 46, No. 28 (2013), Vatican City Wednesday, 10 July, paragraphs 37-49, page 18-20/23.

 

[10] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 77, No. 1 (January 2015) 109.

 

[11] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 76, No. 4 (October 2014) 779.

 

[12] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament VI:  Acts, Esther Chung-Kim and Todd R. Hains (eds.), general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2014:  ISBN 978-0-8308-2969-9 (print) P 1 Y 14) 6.

 

[13] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament VI:  Acts, Esther Chung-Kim and Todd R. Hains (eds.), general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2014:  ISBN 978-0-8308-2969-9 (print) P 1 Y 14) 143.

 

[14] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  Old Testament VII:  Psalms 1—72, Timothy George (ed.), general editor, Scot M. Manetsch, Associate General editor, Herman J. Selderhuis (ed.), (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2015, ISBN 978 0 8308-2957-6 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 15) 9 fn. 6.

 

[15] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 77, No. 2 (April 2015) 365.

 

[16] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament VI:  Acts, Esther Chung-Kim and Todd R. Hains (eds.), general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2014:  ISBN 978-0-8308-2969-9 (print) P 1 Y 14) 297.

 

[17] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 76, No. 4 (October 2014) 763.

 

[18] Grand Rapids: Michigan: Zondervan, 1996, 323, 583, 586.

 

[19] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 76, No. 3 (July 2014) 476.

 

[20] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament III:  Luke, Beth Kreitzer (ed.), general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2015:  ISBN 978-0-8308-2014 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 15) 376 fn. 4.

 

[21] Robert J. Edmonson, CJ, (translator) (Brewster, Massachusetts: Paraclete Press, 2006) 104.

 

 

[22] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament III:  Luke, Beth Kreitzer (ed.), general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2015:  ISBN 978-0-8308-2014 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 15) 114.

 

[23] n.a., The Roman Missal:  Renewed by Decree of the Most Holy Second Ecumenical Council of the Vatican, Promulgated by Authority of Pope Paul VI and Revised at the Direction of Pope John Paul II:  English Translation According to the Third Typical Edition:  For Use in the Dioceses of the United States of America:  Approved by the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops and Confirmed by the Apostolic See (Washington, DC, United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, 2011) 465.  Personal Notes refers to this book as the Missal.

 

[24] National Conference of Catholic Bishops, The Roman Missal Restored by Decree of the Second Ecumenical Council of the Vatican and Promulgated by Authority of Pope Paul VI: Lectionary for Mass:  For Use in the Dioceses of the United States of America:  Second Typical Edition:  Volume I:  Sundays, Solemnities, Feasts of the Lord and the Saints (Collegeville, Minnesota:  The Liturgical Press, 1988) 527.  Personal Notes refers to this book as the Lectionary.

 

[25] UMI Annual Sunday School Lesson Commentary:  Precepts for Living ®: 2015-2016:  International Sunday School Lessons:  Volume 18:  UMI (Urban Ministries, Inc.), A. Okechuku Ogbonnaya, Ph.D., (ed.) (Chicago, IL  60643: UMI (Urban Ministries, Inc.), 2015) 249-250.

 

 

[27] http://www.culturewars.com/2007/Sirico.htm  (accessed February 3, 2016).