With whom would the Faithful identify in the Gospel of John?  Mary?  Jesus?  Disciples?  The servers?  The headwaiter?  The bridegroom?  In my experience with lower division college students, the answers would greatly vary.  In this way, with the Responsorial Antiphon, the Faithful Proclaim his marvelous deeds to all the nations (Psalm 96:3).

 

 

Material above the solid line draws from material below the solid line.  Those uninterested in scholarly and tangential details should stop reading here.  If they do, however, they may miss some interesting material.

 

Readings

First Reading:                   Isaiah 62:1-5

Responsorial Psalm:          Psalm 96:1-2, 2-3, 7-8, 9-10 (3)

Second Reading:              1 Corinthians 12:4-11

Alleluia:                             Cf. 2 Thessalonians 2:14

Gospel:                             Gospel: John 2:1-11

 

Bibliography

Isaiah 62:1-5

Isa 62:1-2, 4b, 5

Burkard M. Zapff, review of Sandra Labouvie, Gottesknecht und neuer David:  Der Heilsmittler für Zion und sine Frohbotschaft nach Jesaja 60-62[1]

Zapff reports that Isaiah 62:1-2, 4b, and 5, used here, are part of the basic text of so-called Trito-Isaiah, written after the exiles have returned to Jerusalem.  Zapff has problems with Labouvie.  “Finally, the historical background of the kingdom of David would deserve a more nuanced treatment in line with current debates.”

 

 

Isa 62:5

Paul V. Niskanen, “Who Is Going to Marry You?  The Text of Isaiah 62:5”[2]

 

 

Psalm 96:1-2, 2-3, 7-8, 9-10 (3)

 

 

1 Corinthians 12:4-11

1 Corinthians 12:1-10

Viktorin Strigel (1524-1569),[3]Hyponemata in All the Psalms”

Strigel shares some biology:  “For the dove . . . does not harm with its beak, it has harmless claws.  And as hawks and ravens attack doves, so tyrants try to destroy pious teachers.”  Paul passes over the dove verse, you shall be covered with silver as the wings of a dove (Psalm 68:14).  The allusion seems to be to armament glistening in the sun, like silver.  I am not finding reference to mercy in either Psalm 68 or 96.

 

1 Corinthians 12:4-12

United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, Co-Workers: In the Vineyard of the Lord:  A Resource for Guiding the development of Lay Ecclesial Ministry[4]

 

 

1 Corinthians 12:4[5]

Martin Luther (1483-1546), “First Lectures on Galatians”

 

 

John Calvin (1509-1564), “Commentary on Ephesians”

 

 

1 Cor 12:4

Anne Hunt, “The Trinitarian Depths of Vatican II”[6]

Hunt writes, “The Holy Spirit (enables) . . . a diversity of gifts both hierarchical and charismatic . . . .in contrast to a strongly hierarchical, monarchical model of church with the laity firmly and passively situated at the bottom of a pyramidal structure, a much-expanded vision of the laity emerged.”

 

1 Corinthians 12:6

John Calvin,[7] “Commentary on Acts 26:18”

 

 

1 Corinthians 12:6

Wolfgang Musculus (1497-1563),[8] “Commentary on John 1:3”

 

 

1 Corinthians 12:6b

Konrad Pellikan (1478-1556),[9] “Commentary on Genesis 1:9-10”

 

 

1 Corinthians 12:8

Urbanus Rhegius, “A Guide to Preaching about the Chief Topics of Christian Doctrine Carefully and without Giving Offense, for Young Ministers of the Word in the Duchy of Lüneburg, 1535”[10]

 

 

1 Corinthians 12:10

Philipp Melanchthon (1497-1560),[11] “Notes on Paul’s Letter to the Colossians 2:8”

 

 

Cf. 2 Thessalonians 2:14

 

 

Gospel: John 2:1-11

John 2:1-11

John Major (1467-1550),[12] “Commentary on John 6:9”

 

 

John 2:1-11

David A. Bosworth, review of Sherri Brown, Gift upon Gift:  Covenant through Word in the Gospel of John[13]

Bosworth reports, “Concerning John 2:1-11, she (Brown) finds that Mary models discipleship (at the Cana marriage) in a context informed by covenant imagery.”  Bosworth is unimpressed by the relationship between the Gospel of John and Covenant; but is very impressed with what Brown has to say about “John’s use of OT images of divine-human relationship.”  Bosworth reports “B. concludes by noting how John’s readers might have located themselves within the various ways that characters respond to Jesus.”

 

John 2:8

Peter Walpot (d. 1578),[14] “The Great Article Book:  On Baptism”

 

 

John 2:1-10

Richard C. Lux, review of Gary M. Burge, Jesus and the Land:  The New Testament Challenge to “Holy Land”[15]

Lux reports that Burge “concludes that, for John, Jesus replaces the temple and “(d)ivine space is now longer a place but in a person.”

 

 

John 2:1-12

Teresa J. Hornsby, review of William Loader, Sexuality in the New Testament:  Understanding the Key Texts[16]

 

 

John 2:3-5

Emil A. Wcela, “What is Catholic about a Catholic Translation of the Bible?”[17]

 

 

John 2:4

John Painter, review of Stefanos Mihalios, The Danielic Eschatological Hour in the Johannine Literature[18]

 

 

John 2:7, 9

Lance Byron Richey, review of Sebastian A. Carnazzo, Seeing Blood and Water:   A Narrative-Critical Study of John 19:34[19]

 

 

John 2:11

Daniel B. Wallace, With Scripture, Subject, and Greek Word Indexes: Greek Grammar:  Beyond the Basics: An Exegetical Syntax of the New Testament[20]

 

 

For more on sources see the Appendix file.  A complete set of Personal Notes, dating from the Fifteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time, July 14, 2002 to the present, is on the web site at www.western-civilization.com/CBQ/Personal%20Notes. 

 

 

 

In the gobbledygook prayer at Sunday Mass immediately following the Gloria, the Faithful hearing the 2011 Roman Missal can listen for “mercifully hear the pleading of your people.”[21]  The Responsorial Antiphon for this Sunday is Proclaim his marvelous deeds to all the nations (Psalm 96:3).[22]  Between November 25, 2011 and November 25, 2012, Personal Notes systematically examined the illiterate 2011 Missal.  For a more thorough examination of the illiterate 2011 Roman Missal, go to 1610 Missal: Thirty-fourth Sunday in Ordinary Time 121125pdf/htm at http://www.western-civilization.com/CBQ/Personal%20Notes/Personal%20Notes.htm.

 

 

This is a call for grace that some Black Baptists bring to mind with The beginning of the word of the LORD by Hosea.  And the LORD said to Hosea, go, take unto thee a wife of whoredoms and children of whoredoms: for the land hath committed great whoredom, departing from the LORD (Hosea 1:2).[23] 

 

Addenda

 

Due to greater responsiveness at the National Catholic Reporter blog, beginning with the Fourth Sunday in Lent, Reading 032B, March 15, 2015, my interest began shifting from annotating my index here, to engaging conversation there.  I may keep up the Bibliography, but without further comment.  Time will tell.

 

As, on June 23, 2015, I prepared Reading 110B for the Seventeenth Sunday in Ordinary time for July 26, I decided to begin reading unread book reviews and articles from Theological Studies for two reasons.  The first is I have already read every article cited in the Catholic Biblical Quarterly.  The second is that traditionally Theological Studies articles have been more helpful to my prayer life.  I also began reading unread book reviews in the Biblical Quarterly and unread sections in Reformation Commentary on Scripture, viz., Psalms.

 

 



[1] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 77 No. 1 (January 2015) 145.

 

[2] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 77, No. 4 (October 2015) 657-667.

 

[3] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  Old Testament VII:  Psalms 1—72, Timothy George (ed.), general editor, Scot M. Manetsch, Associate General editor, Herman J. Selderhuis (ed.), (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2015, ISBN 978 0 8308-2957-6 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 15) 464.

 

[4] Washington, D.C.:  United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, 2005, 20, 52.

 

[5] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament X: Galatians, Ephesians, (ed.) Gerald L. Bray (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic, An Imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2011: ISBN 978-0-8308-2973-6 (P 1 Y 11) 60, 335.

 

[6] Theological Studies, Vol. 74, No. 1 (March 2013) 12. 

 

[7] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament VI:  Acts, Esther Chung-Kim and Todd R. Hains (eds.), general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2014:  ISBN 978-0-8308-2969-9 (print) P 1 Y 14) 342.

 

[8] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament IV:  John 1—12, Craig S. Farmer (ed.), general editor, Timothy George, Associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch (ed.), (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2014, ISBN 978 0 8308-2967-5 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 14.)  17.

 

[9] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  Old Testament I: Genesis I—II, (ed.) John L. Thompson (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic, An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2012) ISBN 978-0-8308-2951-4 (hardcover : alk. paper) P 1 Y 12) 22.

 

[10] In Scott H. Hendrix, ed. and trans., Early Protestant Spirituality (New York, Mahwah: Paulist Press, 2009) 82.

 

[11] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament XI:  Philippians, Colossians, Graham Tomlin (ed.) in collaboration with Gregory B. Graybill, general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2013: ISBN 978-0-8308-2974-3 (P 1 Y 13) 179.

 

[12] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament IV:  John 1—12, Craig S. Farmer (ed.), general editor, Timothy George, Associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch (ed.), (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2014, ISBN 978 0 8308-2967-5 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 14) 200.

 

[13] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 74 No. 4 (October 2012) 810.

 

[14] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament III:  Luke, Beth Kreitzer (ed.), general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2015:  ISBN 978-0-8308-2014 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 15) 353.

 

[15] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 75 No. 1 (January 2013) 142.

 

[16] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 75 No. 1 (January 2013) 159.

 

[17] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 71, No. 2 (April 2009) 495, 497.

 

[18] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 75 No. 2 (April 2013) 365.

 

[19] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 76 No. 3 (July 2014) 547.

 

[20] Grand Rapids: Michigan: Zondervan, 1996, 187, 242, 359.

 

[21] n.a., The Roman Missal:  Renewed by Decree of the Most Holy Second Ecumenical Council of the Vatican, Promulgated by Authority of Pope Paul VI and Revised at the Direction of Pope John Paul II:  English Translation According to the Third Typical Edition:  For Use in the Dioceses of the United States of America:  Approved by the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops and Confirmed by the Apostolic See (Washington, DC, United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, 2011) 462.  Personal Notes refers to this book as the Missal.

 

[22] National Conference of Catholic Bishops, The Roman Missal Restored by Decree of the Second Ecumenical Council of the Vatican and Promulgated by Authority of Pope Paul VI: Lectionary for Mass:  For Use in the Dioceses of the United States of America:  Second Typical Edition:  Volume I:  Sundays, Solemnities, Feasts of the Lord and the Saints (Collegeville, Minnesota:  The Liturgical Press, 1988) 512.  Personal Notes refers to this book as the Lectionary.

 

[23] UMI Annual Sunday School Lesson Commentary:  Precepts for Living ®: 2015-2016:  International Sunday School Lessons:  Volume 18:  UMI (Urban Ministries, Inc.), A. Okechuku Ogbonnaya, Ph.D., (ed.) (Chicago, IL  60643: UMI (Urban Ministries, Inc.), 2015) 221-222.