In a profound way, these readings are about history, mentioned specifically in Psalm 67.  Somehow the Holy Spirit is part of history, both studied and participating.  Humans get in the way of the Holy Spirit, thereby causing so much about which to apologize.  This approach suits my mantra that historians present Church history as a history of scandal, when, more importantly, Church history is a history of the grace of the Holy Spirit among the nations.

 

 

Readings

First Reading:                    Acts 15:1-2, 22-29

Responsorial Psalm:          Psalm 67:2-3, 5, 5, 8 (4)

Second Reading:               Revelation 21:10-14, 22-23

Alleluia:                             John 14:23

Gospel:                             John 14:23-29

 

Annotated Bibliography

Musings above the solid line draw from material below.  Those disinterested in scholarly and tangential details should stop reading here.  If they do, however, they may miss some interesting prayer-provoking details.

 

 

Acts 15:1-2, 22-29

Acts 15

Todd R. Hanneken, “Moses Has His Interpreters:  Understanding the Legal Exegesis in Acts 15 from the Precedent in Jubilees”[1]

 

 

Acts 15:1-29

Dean P. Bechard, S.J., review of Coleman A. Baker, Identity, Memory, and Narrative in Early Christianity:  Peter, Paul, and Recategorization in the Book of Acts [2]

 

 

Acts 15:1-4

Rudolf Gwalther (1519-1586), “Homily 101, Acts 15:1-4”

 

Gwalther, “Homily 101, Acts 15:1-4”

 

Acts 15:1-2

Desiderius Erasmus (1466-1536), “Paraphrase of Acts 15:1-2”

 

Heinrich Bullinger (1504-1575), “Commentary on Acts 15:1-2”

 

Acts 15:2

Ulrich Zwingli (1484-1531), “Letter to Ambrosius Blarer, May 4, 1528”

 

Acts 15:2 

Bullinger, “Commentary on Acts 15:1-2”

 

John Calvin (1509-1564), “Commentary on Acts 15:2”

 

Acts 15:6-29

Robert F. O’Toole, review of Lorenzo Rossi, Pietro e Paolo testimoni del Crocifisso-Risorto:  La synkrisis in Atti 12,1-23 e 27,1-28, 16.  Continuità di un parallelismo nell’opera lucana[3]

O’Toole is unimpressed.

 

Acts 15:22-29

Martin Luther (1483-1546), “Sermon on Acts 15:22-29”[4]

 

Acts 15:24

The English Annotations (1645, 1651, 1657), “Annotations on Acts 15:24”[5]

 

 

Acts 15:28-29

Cardinal Cajetan (1469-1534), “Commentary on Acts 15:28-29”[6]

 

 

Acts 15:29

Bohemian Confession of 1535, “Article 15, Human Traditions”[7]

 

 

Acts 15:29

Daniel B. Wallace, With Scripture, Subject, and Greek Word Indexes: Greek Grammar:  Beyond the Basics: An Exegetical Syntax of the New Testament[8]

 

 

Psalm 67:2-3, 5, 5, 8 (4)

 

 

Revelation 21:10-14, 22-23

Rev 21:1—22:9

Marko Jauhiainen, review of Allan J. McNicol, The Conversion of the Nations in Revelation[9]

Jauhiainen is unimpressed.

 

Revelation 21:12, 14

John Lightfoot (1602-1675), “Harmony of the New Testament, Section 27”[10]

 

 

Revelation 21:22

Dirk Philips (1504-1568), “The Enchiridion:  The Congregation of God”[11]

 

 

John 14:23

 

 

John 14:23-29

John 14:23-24

Andrew Karlstadt (1486-1541), “The Two Greatest Commandments:  Love of God and Love of Neighbor”[12]

 

 

John 14:23

Hannes Brenz (1499-1570), “Homily 118 on Acts 27”[13]

 

John 14:24

Dirk Philips, The Enchiridion:  An Apology or Reply”[14]

 

 

John 14:26

“Encyclical Letter Lumen Fidei of the Supreme Pontiff Francis to the Bishops, Priests, and deacons [sic] and lay Faithful on Faith”[15] 

 

 

John 14:26[16]

Martin Luther (1483-1546), “Sermon on the Feast of Mary’s Visitation (1538)”

 

Luther, “Short Instruction:  What Should Be sought and Expected in the Gospels”

 

 

John 14:26

Gerald O’Collins, S.J., and David Braithwaite, S.J., “Tradition as Collective Memory:  A Theological Task to Be tackled”

“The Advocate, the Holy Spirit, whom the Father will send in my name, will teach you everything and remind you of all that I told you” John 14:26.  The function of reminding makes the Holy Spirit both the subject transmitter of tradition, which sinful humans compromise.  Collins and Braithwaite uses this verse to propound “a theology that expounded tradition a memory.”  That is music to the ears of this historian, as briefly described about the solid line.

 

John 14:27

Beth Kreitzer, ed., “Overview:  Luke 12:49-59:  Christ Challenges the Crowds”[17]

 

 

John 14:27[18]

Johann Agricola (c. 1494-1556), “Sermon on Colossians 1:2”

 

Johannes Bugenhagen (1485-1558), “Annotations 3:15”

 

 

For more on sources see the Appendix file.  A complete set of Personal Notes, dating from the Fifteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time, July 14, 2002 to the present, is on the web site at www.western-civilization.com/CBQ/Personal%20Notes. 

 

 

 

The Responsorial Antiphon for this Sunday is O God, let all the nations praise you! (Psalm 67:4).[19]

 

In the gobbledygook prayer at Sunday Mass immediately following the forgiveness of sins, the Faithful hearing the 2011 Roman Missal can listen for “may we celebrate with heartfelt devotion.”[20]  For a more thorough examination of the illiterate 2011 Roman Missal, go to 1610 Missal:  Thirty-fourth Sunday in Ordinary Time 121125.pdf/htm at http://www.western-civilization.com/CBQ/Personal%20Notes/Personal%20Notes.htm.

 

This is a call for grace that some Black Baptists bring to mind with Take heed to yourselves:  If thy brother trespass against thee, rebuke him; and if he repent forgive him (Luke 17:3).[21] 

 

Addenda

 

Mother Mary Angelica of the Annunciation, born Rita Antoinette Rizzo April 20, 1923 in Canton, Ohio, died March 27, 2016, preempting the Arroyo show, while I was preparing these Notes.

 

As, on June 23, 2015, I prepared Reading 110B for the Seventeenth Sunday in Ordinary time for July 26, I decided to begin reading unread book reviews and articles from Theological Studies for two reasons.  The first is I have already read every article cited in the Catholic Biblical Quarterly.  The second is that traditionally Theological Studies articles have been more helpful to my prayer life.  I also began reading unread book reviews in the Biblical Quarterly and unread sections in Reformation Commentary on Scripture, viz., Luke and Psalms.

 

Comments for May 1 were ready of April 3.  If I ever get three months out, again, I then intend to reevaluate the amount of energy placed into Personal Notes each week.

 

 



[1] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 77, No. 4 (October 2015) 686-706.

 

[2] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 76, No. 1 (January 2014) 129.

[3] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 77, No. 4 (October 2015) 773.

 

[4] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament VI:  Acts, Esther Chung-Kim and Todd R. Hains (eds.), general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2014:  ISBN 978-0-8308-2969-9 (print) P 1 Y 14) 214.

 

[5] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament VI:  Acts, Esther Chung-Kim and Todd R. Hains (eds.), general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2014:  ISBN 978-0-8308-2969-9 (print) P 1 Y 14) 215.

 

[6] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament VI:  Acts, Esther Chung-Kim and Todd R. Hains (eds.), general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2014:  ISBN 978-0-8308-2969-9 (print) P 1 Y 14) 215.

 

[7] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament VI:  Acts, Esther Chung-Kim and Todd R. Hains (eds.), general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2014:  ISBN 978-0-8308-2969-9 (print) P 1 Y 14) 299.

 

[8] Grand Rapids: Michigan: Zondervan, 1996, 108, 485, 493, 607, 633, 718.

 

[9] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 75, No. 3 (July 2013) 589.

 

[10] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament III:  Luke, Beth Kreitzer (ed.), general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2015:  ISBN 978-0-8308-2014 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 15) 132, fn. 11.

 

[11] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament VI:  Acts, Esther Chung-Kim and Todd R. Hains (eds.), general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2014:  ISBN 978-0-8308-2969-9 (print) P 1 Y 14) 94, fn. 35.

 

[12] in Scott H. Hendrix, ed. and trans., Early Protestant Spirituality (New York, Mahwah: Paulist Press, 2009) 155.

 

[13] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament VI:  Acts, Esther Chung-Kim and Todd R. Hains (eds.), general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2014:  ISBN 978-0-8308-2969-9 (print) P 1 Y 14) 358, fn. 19.

 

[14] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament III:  Luke, Beth Kreitzer (ed.), general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2015:  ISBN 978-0-8308-2014 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 15) 200, fn. 7.

 

[15] L’Osservatore Romano: Weekly Edition in English, Vol. 46, No. 28 (2013), Vatican City Wednesday, 10 July, paragraph 38, page 18/23.

 

[16] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament III:  Luke, Beth Kreitzer (ed.), general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2015:  ISBN 978-0-8308-2014 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 15) 39, fn. 3; 485, fn. 10.

 

[17] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament III:  Luke, Beth Kreitzer (ed.), general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2015:  ISBN 978-0-8308-2014 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 15) 274.

 

[18] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament IV:  John 1—12, Craig S. Farmer (ed.), general editor, Timothy George, Associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch (ed.), (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2014, ISBN 978 0 8308-2967-5 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 14) 130, fn. 13; 228.

[19] National Conference of Catholic Bishops, The Roman Missal Restored by Decree of the Second Ecumenical Council of the Vatican and Promulgated by Authority of Pope Paul VI: Lectionary for Mass:  For Use in the Dioceses of the United States of America:  Second Typical Edition:  Volume I:  Sundays, Solemnities, Feasts of the Lord and the Saints (Collegeville, Minnesota:  The Liturgical Press, 1988) 428.  Personal Notes refers to this book as the Lectionary.

 

[20] n.a., The Roman Missal:  Renewed by Decree of the Most Holy Second Ecumenical Council of the Vatican, Promulgated by Authority of Pope Paul VI and Revised at the Direction of Pope John Paul II:  English Translation According to the Third Typical Edition:  For Use in the Dioceses of the United States of America:  Approved by the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops and Confirmed by the Apostolic See (Washington, DC, United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, 2011) 425.  Personal Notes refers to this book as the Missal.

 

[21] UMI Annual Sunday School Lesson Commentary:  Precepts for Living ®: 2013-2014:  International Sunday School Lessons:  Volume 165:  UMI (Urban Ministries, Inc.), a. Okechuku Ogbonnaya, Ph.D., (ed.) (Chicago, IL  60643: UMI (Urban Ministries, Inc.), 2013) 378-380.