The total meaning of the Resurrection is in the mercy of God, revealing to humanity love in the midst of weakness.  Understanding the topsy-turvy world of God begins with Faith in whatever God reveals of himself, especially through Jesus Christ.  It makes no human sense for God to suffer before rising again from the dead.  That reality is scary and revealing.

In the United States, the Faithful are suffering through another Presidential election season, with Republican Donald Trump leading the headlines.  The point is that all of the Presidential candidates respect the Judeo-Christian approach to God, at least rhetorically. 

The middle classes are upset with their economic situations, because their jobs are being shipped to poorer nations.  The middle classes are not proclaiming Judeo-Christian values, though those with those values are shaping the political debates.  Obesity is one outward problem associated with complaining about losing jobs, obesity being a sign of gluttony and gluttony being in a sign of excessive income.

I regard shipping jobs to hungry third and developing world countries as a blessing of God upon those countries.  The basic blessing is from what is called academic freedom and freedom of the press to pursue truth despite political pressure.  That is just what Jesus did on the Cross and the Faithful continue to do in their daily lives.  Prudent moderation is emblematic of reigning in freedom from license, license such as gluttony.

The problem is not simple.  There is a parallel between Hitler and Trump, at this stage of the Trump career.  Hitler did not begin with the Nazi Holocaust; he ended with it.  The German Faithful did not stop Hitler.  In the current situation, the task of the Faithful is to ensure that Trump does not get much father along the path of violence than he has already gone. 

Violence means politics triumphing over truth.  The mainstream media is not recognizing the Christian dimension of that prioritization.  The mainstream media is afraid of promoting the Judeo-Christian values underlying democracy in the United States. 

One way for the Faithful to cope is pray with the Psalmist 118:1, Give thanks to the Lord for he is good, his love is everlasting and that is a love extending to those countries taking jobs out of the United States, thereby forcing the United States to develop better jobs, utilizing the higher skills embedded in education, particularly education teaching what the Psalms have to offer.

 

 

Readings

First Reading:                    Acts 5:12-16

Responsorial Psalm:          Psalm 118: 2-4, 13-15, 22-24 (1)

Second Reading:               Revelation 1:9-11a, 12-13, 17-19

Alleluia:                             John 20:29

Gospel:                             John 20:19-31

 

Annotated Bibliography

Musings above the solid line draw from material below.  Those disinterested in scholarly and tangential details should stop reading here.  If they do, however, they may miss some interesting prayer-provoking details.

 

Acts 5:12-16

Johann Spangenberg (1484-1550), “brief Exegesis of Acts 5:12-16”[1]

 

 

Acts 5:12

Otto Brunfels, “Annotations on Acts 5:12”[2]

 

 

Acts 5:14

The English Annotations (1645, 1651, 1657), “Annotations on Acts 5:14”[3]

 

 

Acts 5:15

Spangenberg, “Brief Exegesis of Acts 5:15”[4]

 

 

Psalm 118: 2-4, 13-15, 22-24 (1)

Psalm 118:1-2, 14-24

Martin Luther (1483-1546), “The Beautiful Confitemini (Psalm 118-16-18), 1530”[5]

 

 

Psalm 118:1

Joann Baumgart (Pomarius) (1514-1578), “The Gospel on the First Sunday of Advent”[6]

 

 

Psalm 118:14

John Calvin (1509-1564), “Commentary on Psalm 68”[7]

 

 

Psalm 118:22-23

John Boys (1571-1625), “Exposition of Psalm 2”[8]

 

Jacobus Arminius (1559-1609), “Disputation I:  On the Authority and Certainty of the Sacred Scriptures”[9]

 

Calvin, “Commentary on Philippians 1:14”[10]

 

 

Psalm 118:22-24

Mark C. Kiley, review of Jean-Luc Vesco, Le Psautier de Jésus:  Les citations des Psaumes dans le Nouveau Testament[11]

 

 

Psalm 118:22

Karl Allen Kuhn, “Deaf or Defiant?  The Literary, Cultural, and Affective-Rhetorical Keys to the Naming of John (Luke 1: 77-80)”[12]

 

 

Revelation 1:9-11a, 12-13, 17-19

Rev 1:9-16

Edward Bode, review of Carlo Manunza, L’Apocalisse come “actio liturgica” christiana:  Studio esegetico-teologico di Ap 1,9-16; 3,14-22, 13,9-10, 19,1-8[13]

Watch for this to be translated.  To this point, I have treated the Apocalypse as a type of Rhorshock test revealing more about the reader than the writer.  Manunza describes Revelation as “a manual of action, a liturgical witness written for celebration” (p. 540).

 

 

 

 

Rev 1:9-20

Russell Morton, review of Jean DeLorme and Isabelle Donegani, L ’Apocalypse de Jean:  Révélation  pour le temps de la violence et du désir.  Vol. 1, Chapitres 12—22[14]

 

 

Rev 1:9

Daniel B. Wallace, With Scripture, Subject, and Greek Word Indexes: Greek Grammar:  Beyond the Basics: An Exegetical Syntax of the New Testament[15]

 

 

Revelation 1:10

James H. Evans [sic] Jr., We have been Believers:  An African American Systematic Theology[16]

 

 

Rev 1:12-20

Russell Morton, review of W. Gordon Campbell, Reading Revelation:  A Thematic Approach[17]

 

 

Rev 1:19

G. K. Beale, review of Paul T. Penley, The Common Tradition behind Synoptic Sayings of Judgment and John’s Apocalypse:  An Oral Interpretive Tradition of OT Prophetic Material[18]

This review is a mish-mash of conflicting elements, ending with “his thesis of a “common oral tradition” (p. 60) overstates the evidence.

 

John 20:29

 

 

John 20:19-31

John 20:20

Pope Francis, The Joy of the Gospel[19] 

 

 

For more on sources see the Appendix file.  A complete set of Personal Notes, dating from the Fifteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time, July 14, 2002 to the present, is on the web site at www.western-civilization.com/CBQ/Personal%20Notes. 

 

 

 

The Responsorial Antiphon for this Sunday is Give thanks to the Lord for he is good, his love is everlasting (Psalm 118:1).[20]

 

In the gobbledygook prayer at Sunday Mass immediately following the forgiveness of sins, the Faithful hearing the 2011 Roman Missal can listen for “God of everlasting mercy.”[21]  For a more thorough examination of the illiterate 2011 Roman Missal, go to 1610 Missal:  Thirty-fourth Sunday in Ordinary Time 121125.pdf/htm at http://www.western-civilization.com/CBQ/Personal%20Notes/Personal%20Notes.htm.

 

This is a call for grace that some Black Baptists bring to mind with When Jesus heard these things, he marveled at him, and turned him about, and said unto the people that followed him, I say unto you, I have not found so great a faith, no, not in Israel (Luke 7:9).[22]  

 

Addenda

 

Due to greater responsiveness at the National Catholic Reporter blog, beginning with the Fourth Sunday in Lent, Reading 032B, March 15, 2015, my interest began shifting from annotating my index here, to engaging conversation there.  I am keeping up the Bibliography, but with less comment, as explained below. 

 

Raymond Arroyo, “The World Over,” on EWTN uses fear-mongering, rather than the Joy of the Gospel to entrance its viewers.  In the past, Arroyo has responded to my concerns, particularly the Reverend Robert A. Sirico, who rarely appears anymore, with his drivel.  Beginning, May 3, 2015, I intend to begin pointing out, here, the role fear, rather than joy, has in “The World Over.” 

 

By July 31, 2015 I had identified a pattern of attack on Pope Francis by Arroyo.  On March 17, 2016, Arroyo spent most of his program with a Jerry Lewis Encore but only after pointing out that Mueller had corrected Pope Francis for not being a theologian.  Arroyo continues to advertise his Will Wilder book for children.

 

As, on June 23, 2015, I prepared Reading 110B for the Seventeenth Sunday in Ordinary time for July 26, I decided to begin reading unread book reviews and articles from Theological Studies for two reasons.  The first is I have already read every article cited in the Catholic Biblical Quarterly.  The second is that traditionally Theological Studies articles have been more helpful to my prayer life.  I also began reading unread book reviews in the Biblical Quarterly and unread sections in Reformation Commentary on Scripture, viz., Luke and Psalms.

 

As of March 19, 2016, comments for April 3 were ready for Friday, March 25.  Were they handed out then, recipients would have a week in which to prepare to discuss the handout the following Friday, April 1, in time for Sunday Mass, April 3.  This means I intend to begin getting ahead for the time required for an anticipated operation, whose technical name I do not yet have.  Income tax and indexing the Catholic Biblical Quarterly ae caught up.  If I ever get three months out, again, I then intend to reevaluate the amount of energy placed into Personal Notes each week.

 

 



[1] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament VI:  Acts, Esther Chung-Kim and Todd R. Hains (eds.), general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2014:  ISBN 978-0-8308-2969-9 (print) P 1 Y 14) 65.

 

[2] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament VI:  Acts, Esther Chung-Kim and Todd R. Hains (eds.), general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2014:  ISBN 978-0-8308-2969-9 (print) P 1 Y 14) 65 fn. 2.

 

[3] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament VI:  Acts, Esther Chung-Kim and Todd R. Hains (eds.), general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2014:  ISBN 978-0-8308-2969-9 (print) P 1 Y 14) 65.

 

[4] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament VI:  Acts, Esther Chung-Kim and Todd R. Hains (eds.), general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2014:  ISBN 978-0-8308-2969-9 (print) P 1 Y 14) 66.

 

[5] In Scott H. Hendrix, ed. and trans., Early Protestant Spirituality (New York, Mahwah: Paulist Press, 2009) 306 fn. 9 from page 56; fn. 11 from page 57; 57.

 

[6] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament III:  Luke, Beth Kreitzer (ed.), general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2015:  ISBN 978-0-8308-2014 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 15) 378, fn. 10.

 

[7] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  Old Testament VII:  Psalms 1—72, Timothy George (ed.), general editor, Scot M. Manetsch, Associate General editor, Herman J. Selderhuis (ed.), (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2015, ISBN 978 0 8308-2957-6 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 15)

 

[8] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  Old Testament VII:  Psalms 1—72, Timothy George (ed.), general editor, Scot M. Manetsch, Associate General editor, Herman J. Selderhuis (ed.), (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2015, ISBN 978 0 8308-2957-6 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 15) 22, fn. 14.

 

[9] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  Old Testament VII:  Psalms 1—72, Timothy George (ed.), general editor, Scot M. Manetsch, Associate General editor, Herman J. Selderhuis (ed.), (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2015, ISBN 978 0 8308-2957-6 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 15) 167 fn. 5.

 

[10] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament XI:  Philippians, Colossians, Graham Tomlin (ed.) in collaboration with Gregory B. Graybill, general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2013: ISBN 978-0-8308-2974-3 (P 1 Y 13) 22 fn. 4.

 

[11] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 76, No. 2 (April 2014) 384.

 

[12] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 71, No. 2 (2013) #3 496.

 

[13] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 76, No. 4 (October 2014) 771-774.

 

[14] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 74, No. 1 (January 2012) 149 (volume missing March 19, 2016).

 

[15] Grand Rapids: Michigan: Zondervan, 1996, 274, 277, 287.

 

[16] second edition (Minneapolis:  Fortress Press, 2012) 172  Book missing March 19, 2016).

 

[17] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 76, No. 3 (July 2014) 543.

 

[18] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 75, No. 1 (January 2013) 170.

 

[19] Erlanger, Kentucky:  Libreria Editrice Vaticana, DynamicCatholic.com, 2014, 10.

 

 

[20] National Conference of Catholic Bishops, The Roman Missal Restored by Decree of the Second Ecumenical Council of the Vatican and Promulgated by Authority of Pope Paul VI: Lectionary for Mass:  For Use in the Dioceses of the United States of America:  Second Typical Edition:  Volume I:  Sundays, Solemnities, Feasts of the Lord and the Saints (Collegeville, Minnesota:  The Liturgical Press, 1988) 362.  Personal Notes refers to this book as the Lectionary.

 

[21] n.a., The Roman Missal:  Renewed by Decree of the Most Holy Second Ecumenical Council of the Vatican, Promulgated by Authority of Pope Paul VI and Revised at the Direction of Pope John Paul II:  English Translation According to the Third Typical Edition:  For Use in the Dioceses of the United States of America:  Approved by the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops and Confirmed by the Apostolic See (Washington, DC, United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, 2011) 395.  Personal Notes refers to this book as the Missal.

 

[22] UMI Annual Sunday School Lesson Commentary:  Precepts for Living ®: 2013-2014:  International Sunday School Lessons:  Volume 165:  UMI (Urban Ministries, Inc.), a. Okechuku Ogbonnaya, Ph.D., (ed.) (Chicago, IL  60643: UMI (Urban Ministries, Inc.), 2013) 340-341.