As I prepare Personal Notes for each Sunday, I first reread Personal Notes for the previous four cycles.  For those receiving weekly copies of Personal Notes, prior cycles are available at http://www.western-civilization.com/CBQ/Personal%20Notes/Personal%20Notes.htm.  At this point, the Reformation Commentary on Scripture has had sufficient opportunity for me to realize nothing there stirs the depths of my soul. 

Stirring the depths of my soul for prayer is the purpose of Personal Notes.  As best I can tell, there is no ecumenical benefit for the Reformation Commentary, either.  This means I intend to shift attention away from the Reformation Commentary and back toward articles in the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, with particular attention to the Gospels, because the Gospels is where Sunday sermons focus.

 

Recent theology shifts from the Synoptic view of Jesus in his human personality.  For the Synoptics, the crucifixion marks the death of the human Jesus.  The resurrection is central both to the Synoptics and the Liturgy of the Word. 

The theological shift is to Jesus in his Divine personality.  For John, the crucifixion marks the love of God for humanity.  For John, the crucifixion marks new life, the Holy Spirit, handed on to the Faithful.  The Synoptics write to foster faith in the risen human Christ; John writes to foster faith in the eternal Divine Christ.

 

 

Material above the solid line draws from material below the solid line.  Those uninterested in scholarly and tangential details should stop reading here.  If they do, however, they may miss some interesting material.

 

Readings

First Reading:                    Acts 2:42-47

Responsorial Psalm:          Psalm 118: 2-4, 13-15, 22-24 (1)

Second Reading:               1 Peter 1:3-9

Alleluia:                             John 20:29

Gospel:                             John 20:19-31

 

Annotated Bibliography

 

 

Acts 2:42-47

Acts 2:14-36, 42-47, 44-47, 44-45, 44,

in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament VI:  Acts, Esther Chung-Kim and Todd R. Hains (eds.), general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2014:  ISBN 978-0-8308-2969-9 (print) P 1 Y 14) 24-28, 35-39, 55; 3, 38, 37.

 

 

Acts 2:41-42

Benjamin A. Edsall, “Persuasion and Force in Acts:  A Response to C. Kavin Rowe”[1]

 

 

Acts 2:42-47

in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament VI:  Acts, Esther Chung-Kim and Todd R. Hains (eds.), general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2014:  ISBN 978-0-8308-2969-9 (print) P 1 Y 14) 35-47.

 

 

Acts 2:42

Daniel B. Wallace, With Scripture, Subject, and Greek Word Indexes: Greek Grammar:  Beyond the Basics: An Exegetical Syntax of the New Testament[2]

 

 

Acts 2:42

Bernard P. Prusak, “Explaining Eucharistic `Real Presence’:  Moving beyond a Medieval Conundrum”[3]

 

 

Acts 2:42

Andrés García Serrano, “Anna’s Characterization in Luke 2:36-38:  A Case of Conceptual Allusion?”[4]

 

 

 

 

Acts 2:42

in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament VI:  Acts, Esther Chung-Kim and Todd R. Hains (eds.), general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2014:  ISBN 978-0-8308-2969-9 (print) P 1 Y 14) 35, 277.

 

 

Acts 2:43

in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament IV:  John 1—12, Craig S. Farmer (ed.), general editor, Timothy George, Associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch (ed.), (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2014, ISBN 978 0 8308-2967-5 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 14) 313.

 

 

Acts 2:46

Timothy W. Reardon, “Cleansing through Almsgiving in Luke-Acts:  Purity, Cornelius, and the Translation of Acts 15:9”[5]

 

 

Acts 2:46, 47

Pope Francis, The Joy of the Gospel [6]

 

Psalm 118: 2-4, 13-15, 22-24 (1)

Funeral Rites uses Psalm 118 once.[7]

 

 

Psalm 118:1-2, 14-24, 14, 15.

in Scott H. Hendrix, ed. and trans., Early Protestant Spirituality (New York, Mahwah: Paulist Press, 2009) 306 306, 57

 

 

Psalm 118:1

in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament III:  Luke, Beth Kreitzer (ed.), general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2015:  ISBN 978-0-8308-2014 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 15) 378.

 

 

Psalm 118:14, 22-23

in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  Old Testament VII:  Psalms 1—72, Timothy George (ed.), general editor, Scot M. Manetsch, Associate General editor, Herman J. Selderhuis (ed.), (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2015, ISBN 978 0 8308-2957-6 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 15) 462, 22, 167.

 

 

Psalm 118:22

Kevin W. Irwin, The Sacraments:  Historical Foundations and Liturgical Theology[8]

 

 

1 Peter 1:3-9

Pastoral Care of the Sick uses this reading.[9]

 

 

1 Peter 1:1-25

in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament VIII:  Romans 9—16, Timothy George (ed.), general editor; Scot M. Manetsch, Associate General editor; Philip D. W. Krey and Peter D. S. Krey (ed.), (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2016, ISBN 978 0 8308-2971-2, P 1, Y 16) 62.

 

 

 

1 Peter 1:3-5, 8

in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  Old Testament VII:  Psalms 1—72, Timothy George (ed.), general editor, Scot M. Manetsch, Associate General editor, Herman J. Selderhuis (ed.), (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2015, ISBN 978 0 8308-2957-6 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 15) 123, 155

 

 

1 Peter 1:3

John H. Elliott, review of Paul A. Holloway, Coping with Prejudice:  1 Peter in Social-Psychological Perspective[10]

Elliott has two basic reactions.  “Reenter “pie in the sky in the sweet bye and bye”—a dog that I thought no longer hunted” and “Nevertheless, the study provides fresh materials for appreciating the method and skill with which the Letter’s author addressed the issues of prejudice and suffering.  It deserves a close but critical reading.”

 

1 Peter 1:4

Nathan Eubank, “Storing Up Treasure with God in the Heavens:  Celestial Investments in Matthew 6:121”[11]

 

 

1 Peter 1:6-7

in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  Old Testament V:  1-2 Samuel, 1-2 Kings, 1-2 Chronicles, Timothy George (ed.), general editor, Scot M. Manetsch, Associate General editor, Derek Cooper and Martin J. Lohrmann (ed.), (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2016, ISBN 978 0 8308-2955-2 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 16) 351.

 

 

1 Peter 1:6

Michael Gilmour, review of Duane F. Watson and Terrance Callan, First and Second Peter[12]

 

 

1 Peter 1:8

in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament IV:  John 1—12, Craig S. Farmer (ed.), general editor, Timothy George, Associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch (ed.), (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2014, ISBN 978 0 8308-2967-5 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 14) 223.

 

 

John 20:29

 

 

John 20:19-31

John 20:19, 26

Bernard P. Prusak, “Explaining Eucharistic `Real Presence’:  Moving beyond a Medieval Conundrum”[13]

 

 

John 20:19, 27

Richard W. Miller, “Deep Responsibility for the Deep Future”[14]

 

 

John 20:20

Pope Francis, The Joy of the Gospel[15]

 

 

John 20:22

Emil A. Wcela, “What is Catholic about a Catholic Translation of the Bible?”[16]

 

 

Richard I. Pervo, review of William P. Atkinson, Baptism in the Spirit:  Luke-Acts and the Dunn Debate[17]

 

 

John 20:22

Mary Coloe, review of Carlos Raúl Sosa Siliezar, Creation Imagery in the Gospel of John[18]

Coloe reports, “John 20:20, where Jesus `Breathes’ on his disciples and sends them on mission, S. accepts as an evocation of creation imagery, as Jesus creates disciples anew to participate in and continue his divine work, thus participating in the new creation of God (p. 172).”

 

John 20:22

Peter-Ben Smit, “The Gift of the Spirit in John 19:30?  A Reconsideration of paredwken to pneuma[19]

 

 

John 20:22

José Enrique Aguilar Chiu, “A Theological Reading of exepneusen in Mark 15:37,39”[20]

 

 

John 20:29

in Scott H. Hendrix, ed. and trans., Early Protestant Spirituality (New York, Mahwah: Paulist Press, 2009) 121.

 

 

John 20:30-31

Brendan Byrne, S.J., review of Francis J. Moloney, S.D.B., The Resurrection of the Messiah:  A Narrative Commentary on the Resurrection Accounts in the Four Gospels[21]

 

 

 

 

John 20:30-31

Chris Keith, “The Competitive Textualization of the Jesus Tradition in John 20:30-31 and 21:25”[22]

 

 

John 20:30-31

James Swetnam, S.J., review of Yao Adingra Justin Kouamé, Commencement d’un parcours:  Une étude exégétique et théologique de Jn 3, 1-21[23]

Swetnam reports,

 

K. misses a crucial point, perhaps because it is such a recent development in the theology of the cross:  Jesus as God hands on his Spirit to his mother, whom he has addressed by the symbolic name woman” and designated mother of the church.  This change in identity for her is in fulfillment of her previous role as “woman” at Cana where, as “Daughter of Zion,” she symbolized Jerusalem as “Daughter of Zion.”

 

At the same time that Jesus designates his mother as mother of the church, he designates the beloved disciple, John, as her son.  Thus, John is the witness leading many sons and daughters of the church to belief in the divinity of Christ, just as Peter is the witness leading many sons and daughters of the church to belief in his risen humanity.  This can be ascertained from John 20:30-31 (used here), where John states the purpose of his Gospel (recognized by K. on pp. 233 and 266).

 

Now Jesus did many other signs in the presence of his disciples that are not written in this book.  But these are written that you may come to believe that Jesus is the Christ, the son of God, and that through this belief you may have life in his name” (John 20:30-31).  Comments above the solid line draw from this review.

 

For more on sources see the Appendix file.  A complete set of Personal Notes, dating from the Fifteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time, July 14, 2002 to the present, is on the web site at www.western-civilization.com/CBQ/Personal%20Notes. 

 

 

 

In the gobbledygook prayer at Sunday Mass immediately following the Gloria, the Faithful hearing the 2011 Roman Missal can listen for “in what font they have been washed.”[24]  The Responsorial Antiphon for this Sunday is Give thanks to the Lord for he is good, his love is everlasting (Psalm 118:1).[25]  Between November 25, 2011 and November 25, 2012, Personal Notes systematically examined the illiterate 2011 Missal.  For a more thorough examination of the illiterate 2011 Roman Missal, go to 1610 Missal: Thirty-fourth Sunday in Ordinary Time 121125.pdf/htm at http://www.western-civilization.com/CBQ/Personal%20Notes/Personal%20Notes.htm.

 

 

 

This is a call for grace that some Black Baptists bring to mind with Nor height, nor depth, nor any other creature, shall be able to separate us from the love of God, which is in Christ Jesus our Lord (Romans 8:39)[26] 

 

Addenda

 

Due to greater responsiveness at the National Catholic Reporter blog, beginning with the Fourth Sunday in Lent, Reading 032B, March 15, 2015, my interest began shifting from annotating my index here, to engaging conversation there.  I may keep up the Bibliography, but without further comment.  Time will tell.  Beginning with the Second Sunday of Easter, April 23, 2017, my interest began shifting back toward annotating  the Catholic Biblical Quarterly.

 

On Wednesday, December 28, 2016, I discovered that my web site, www.western-civilization.com was receiving 1000 hits per day, from the United States, most of which were for these readings.  That complicates my priorities, priorities that require balancing between developing these Personal Notes, engaging writing on the National Catholic Reporter at https://www.ncronline.org/blogs/ncr-today, developing a Cleveland Organizing Branch of the Association for the Study of African American Life and History (ASALH), attending to my archival resources at the Western Reserve Historical Society, and preparing my 1972 dissertation, “Cleveland and the Negro following World War II” for publication at least on the web.  I am the founding president of the Hampton Roads, from which the movie “Hidden Figures” arose, meaning that these priorities have potential consequences of note.

 

As, on June 23, 2015, I prepared Reading 110B for the Seventeenth Sunday in Ordinary time for July 26, I decided to begin reading unread book reviews and articles from Theological Studies for two reasons.  The first is I have already read every article cited in the Catholic Biblical Quarterly.  The second is that traditionally Theological Studies articles have been more helpful to my prayer life.  I also began reading unread book reviews in the Biblical Quarterly.  Beginning with the Second Sunday of Easter, April 23, 2017, I realized the Reformation Commentary on Scripture was doing little for my prayer-life and I began to drift away from the time-consuming details I had been recording.

 

 



[1] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 78, No. 3 (July 2016) 490.

 

[2] Grand Rapids: Michigan: Zondervan, 1996, 119, 225.

 

[3] Theological Studies, Vol. 75, No. 2 (June 2014) 236.

 

[4] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 76, No. 3 (July 2014) 472.

 

[5] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 78, No. 3 (July 2016) 470.

 

[6] (Erlanger, Kentucky:  Libreria Editrice Vaticana, DynamicCatholic.com, 2014) 10, 198.

 

[7] International Commission on English in the Liturgy: A Joint Commission of Catholic Bishops’ Conferences, The Roman Ritual: Revised by Decree of the Second Vatican Ecumenical Council and published by Authority of Pope Paul IV: Order of Christian Funerals: Including Appendix 2: Cremation: Approved for use in the Dioceses of the United States of America by the National Conference of Catholic Bishops and Confirmed by the Apostolic See (New Jersey: Catholic Book Publishing Co., 1998) 275.

 

[8] (New York:  Paulist Press, 2016) 272.

 

[9] The Roman Ritual: Revised by Decree of the Second Vatican Ecumenical Council and Published by Authority of Pope Paul VI: Pastoral Care of the Sick: Rites of Anointing and Viaticum: Approved for use in the dioceses of the United States of America by the National Conference of Catholic Bishops and Confirmed by the Apostolic See: Prepared by International Commission on English in the Liturgy: a Joint Commission of Catholic Bishops’ Conferences (New York: Catholic Book Publishing Co. 1983) 278.

 

[10] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 76, No. 3 (July 2014) 554.

 

[11] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 76, No. 1 (January 2014) 84.

 

[12] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 76, No. 2 (April 2014) 384.

 

[13] Theological Studies, Vol. 75, No. 2 (June 2014) 236, 257.

 

[14] Theological Studies, Vol. 77, No. 2 (June 2016) 450.

 

[15] (Erlanger, Kentucky:  Libreria Editrice Vaticana, DynamicCatholic.com, 2014) 10.

 

[16] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 71, No. 2 (April 2009) 496.

 

[17] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 77, No. 1 (January 2015) 165.

 

[18] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 78, No. 2 (April 2016) 380.

 

[19] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 78, No. 1 (January 2016) 455.

 

[20] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 78, Vol. 4 (October 2016) 682.

 

[21] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 77, No. 3 (July 2015) 564.

 

[22] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 78, No. 2 (April 2016) 321-337.

 

[23] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 78, No. 4 (October 2016) 780.

 

[24] n.a., The Roman Missal:  Renewed by Decree of the Most Holy Second Ecumenical Council of the Vatican, Promulgated by Authority of Pope Paul VI and Revised at the Direction of Pope John Paul II:  English Translation According to the Third Typical Edition:  For Use in the Dioceses of the United States of America:  Approved by the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops and Confirmed by the Apostolic See (Washington, DC, United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, 2011) 395.  Personal Notes refers to this book as the Missal.

 

[25] National Conference of Catholic Bishops, The Roman Missal Restored by Decree of the Second Ecumenical Council of the Vatican and Promulgated by Authority of Pope Paul VI: Lectionary for Mass:  For Use in the Dioceses of the United States of America:  Second Typical Edition:  Volume I:  Sundays, Solemnities, Feasts of the Lord and the Saints (Collegeville, Minnesota:  The Liturgical Press, 1988) 350.  Personal Notes refers to this book as the Lectionary.

 

[26] UMI Annual Sunday School Lesson Commentary:  Precepts for Living ®: 2016-2017:  International Sunday School Lessons:  Volume 19:  UMI (Urban Ministries, Inc.), A. Okechuku Ogbonnaya, Ph.D., (ed.) (Chicago, IL  60643: UMI (Urban Ministries, Inc.), 2016) 360-361.