The following news item is dated Friday, May 17, 2002.  John Paul II was Pontiff 1978-2005; Benedict XVI 2005-2013; and Francis 2013-present..[1] 

 

Roman Catholic bishops should avoid telling congregations their parish priests sexually abused someone if the bishops believe the priests will not abuse again, a Vatican official said.

 

The Rev. Gianfranco Ghirlanda also said in an article to be published Saturday that church leaders have no legal or moral responsibilities if such abuse does occur.

 

The Vatican appeals court judge insisted church leaders must protect the "good name" of their priests and only a guilty cleric truly is responsible for his actions.

 

"From a canon law perspective, the bishop and the superior are neither morally nor judicially responsible for the acts committed by one of their clergy," said Ghirlanda, dean of canon law at the Pontifical Gregorian University in Rome.

 

The article is in the influential Jesuit magazine Civilta Cattolica, which often reflects Vatican thinking. The Vatican is struggling to deal with worldwide allegations of sexual abuse by priests.

 

Ghirlanda argued that a priest whose past acts of abuse were revealed to his congregation "would be totally discredited in front of his parochial community and in fact would be blocked from any effective pastoral action."

 

"If the bishop fears the priest could again commit a crime, then he must not entrust to the priest a parish, but must act in a different way."

 

However, Ghirlanda also said priests should not be forced to take psychological tests to assess the likelihood of their committing abuse.

 

"To our thinking, it's not admissible that the incriminated cleric be forced to undergo a psychological investigation to determine if his personality is inclined to commit the crimes in question," the article said.

 

American church officials are accused of covering up sexual misconduct by priests, in some cases by moving known abusers from job to job. The church has paid millions of dollars in damages to victims and faces numerous lawsuits.

 

Dozens of priests have been suspended or forced to resign. Many dioceses also are informing local prosecutors of prior abuse allegations against priests.

 

This week, a Baltimore priest was shot, allegedly by a man who claimed the priest abused him, while another priest accused of sexual abuse apparently committed suicide in Maryland.

 

The ongoing U.S. scandal prompted last month's extraordinary meeting at the Vatican between Pope John Paul II, 12 of the 13 American cardinals and some top American bishops. The clergymen chose not to set strict rules before a June 13-15 meeting of American bishops in Dallas.

 

The sexual cover-ups make the Roman Catholic Church look as bad, if nor worse, than the unreconstructed Roman Catholic Church before the Council of Trent (1545-156).  There is plenty about which to pray this Easter.

 

 

Material above the solid line draws from material below the solid line.  Those uninterested in scholarly and tangential details should stop reading here.  If they do, however, they may miss some interesting material.

 

Readings

First Reading:                    Acts 10:34a, 37-43

Psalm:                              Psalm 118:1-2, 16-17, 22-23 (24)

Second Reading                Colossians 3:1-4

Alleluia Verse                    cf. 1 Corinthians 5:7b-8a

Gospel:                             John 20:1-9

 

Annotated Bibliography

 

 

Acts 10:34a, 37-43


 

Acts 10:1-48

 

Timothy W. Reardon, “Cleansing through Almsgiving in Luke-Acts:  Purity, Cornelius, and the Translation of Acts 15:9”[2]

 

 

Acts 10:34A, 37-43

in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament VI:  Acts, Esther Chung-Kim and Todd R. Hains (eds.), general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2014:  ISBN 978-0-8308-2969-9 (print) P 1 Y 14) 140-144.

 

 

Acts 10:43

Daniel B. Wallace, With Scripture, Subject, and Greek Word Indexes: Greek Grammar:  Beyond the Basics: An Exegetical Syntax of the New Testament[3]

 

 

Psalm 118:1-2, 16-17, 22-23 (24)

          The Church makes Psalm 118 available for funerals.[4]

 

 

Psalm 118:1-2, 14-24

In Scott H. Hendrix, ed. and trans., Early Protestant Spirituality (New York, Mahwah: Paulist Press, 2009) 306.

 

 

Psalm 118:1

in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament III:  Luke, Beth Kreitzer (ed.), general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2015:  ISBN 978-0-8308-2014 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 15) 378.

 

 

Colossians 3:1-4

Colossians 3:1-4

in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament XI:  Philippians, Colossians, Graham Tomlin (ed.) in collaboration with Gregory B. Graybill, general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2013: ISBN 978-0-8308-2974-3 (P 1 Y 13)207-217.

 

 

Colossians 3:1

in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament III:  Luke, Beth Kreitzer (ed.), general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2015:  ISBN 978-0-8308-2014 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 15) 269.

 

 

Colossians 3:3-4

in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  Old Testament VII:  Psalms 1—72, Timothy George (ed.), general editor, Scot M. Manetsch, Associate General editor, Herman J. Selderhuis (ed.), (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2015, ISBN 978 0 8308-2957-6 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 15) 368.

 

 

cf. 1 Corinthians 5:7b-8a

1 Corinthians 5:6

in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament VIII:  Romans 9—16, Timothy George (ed.), general editor; Scot M. Manetsch, Associate General editor; Philip D. W. Krey and Peter D. S. Krey (ed.), (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2016, ISBN 978 0 8308-2971-2, P 1, Y 16) 252.

 

 

1 Corinthians 5:7, 8

In Scott H. Hendrix, ed. and trans., Early Protestant Spirituality (New York, Mahwah: Paulist Press, 2009) 115, 224.

 

 


 

1 Corinthians 5:7

in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  Old Testament V:  1-2 Samuel, 1-2 Kings, 1-2 Chronicles, Timothy George (ed.), general editor, Scot M. Manetsch, Associate General editor, Derek Cooper and Martin J. Lohrmann (ed.), (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2016, ISBN 978 0 8308-2955-2[RJ1]  (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 16) 175.

 

 

John 20:1-9

John 20:1-18

Vincent M. Smiles, review of William P. Brown, Sacred Sense:  Discovering the Wonder of God’s Word and World [5]

 

 

John 20:2

in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament IV:  John 1—12, Craig S. Farmer (ed.), general editor, Timothy George, Associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch (ed.), (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2014, ISBN 978 0 8308-2967-5 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 14) 225.

 

 

John 20:3

in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament III:  Luke, Beth Kreitzer (ed.), general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2015:  ISBN 978-0-8308-2014 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 15) 480.

 

 

For more on sources see the Appendix file.  A complete set of Personal Notes, dating from the Fifteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time, July 14, 2002 to the present, is on the web site at www.western-civilization.com/CBQ/Personal%20Notes. 

 

 

 

In the gobbledygook prayer at Sunday Mass immediately following the Gloria, the Faithful hearing the 2011 Roman Missal can listen for “unlocked for us the path to eternity.”[6]  The Responsorial Antiphon for this Sunday is This is the day the Lord has made; let us rejoice and be glad (Psalm 118:24).[7]  Between November 25, 2011 and November 25, 2012, Personal Notes systematically examined the illiterate 2011 Missal.  For a more thorough examination of the illiterate 2011 Roman Missal, go to 1610 Missal: Thirty-fourth Sunday in Ordinary Time 121125.pdf/htm at http://www.western-civilization.com/CBQ/Personal%20Notes/Personal%20Notes.htm.

 

 

This is a call for grace that some Black Baptists bring to mind with Then went in also that other disciple, which came first to the sepulchre, and he saw, and believed (John 20:8).[8] 

 

Addenda

 

Due to greater responsiveness at the National Catholic Reporter blog, beginning with the Fourth Sunday in Lent, Reading 032B, March 15, 2015, my interest began shifting from annotating my index here, to engaging conversation there.  I may keep up the Bibliography, but without further comment.  Time will tell. 

 

On Wednesday, December 28, 2016, I discovered that my web site, www.western-civilization.com was receiving 1000 hits per day, from the United States, most of which were for these readings.  That complicates my priorities, priorities that require balancing between developing these Personal Notes, engaging writing on the National Catholic Reporter at https://www.ncronline.org/blogs/ncr-today, developing a Cleveland Organizing Branch of the Association for the Study of African American Life and History (ASALH), attending to my archival resources at the Western Reserve Historical Society, and preparing my 1972 dissertation, “Cleveland and the Negro following World War II” for publication at least on the web.  I am the founding president of the Hampton Roads, from which the movie “Hidden Figures” arose, meaning that these priorities have potential consequences of note.

 

Raymond Arroyo, “The World Over,” on EWTN uses fear-mongering, rather than the Joy of the Gospel to entrance its viewers.  In the past, Arroyo has responded to my concerns, particularly the Reverend Robert A. Sirico, who rarely appears anymore, with his drivel.  Beginning, May 3, 2015, I intend to begin pointing out, here, the role fear, rather than joy, has in “The World Over.” 

 

By July 31, I had identified a pattern of attack on Pope Francis by Arroyo.  The attack is on what the Pope is preaching about climate change and capitalism.  In the United States Republicans have firm opposition to such sermonizing, as the forthcoming as the Trump administration will show . . . or not.

 

As, on June 23, 2015, I prepared Reading 110B for the Seventeenth Sunday in Ordinary time for July 26, I decided to begin reading unread book reviews and articles from Theological Studies for two reasons.  The first is I have already read every article cited in the Catholic Biblical Quarterly.  The second is that traditionally Theological Studies articles have been more helpful to my prayer life.  I also began reading unread book reviews in the Biblical Quarterly.  

 

 



[1] http://www.remnantofgod.org/coverup4.htm  accessed Sunday, March 19, 2017

[2] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 78, No. 3 (July 2016) 464, 465, 467, 471-473, 476.

[3] Grand Rapids: Michigan: Zondervan, 1996, 359, 370, 621

 

[4] N.a., International Commission on English in the Liturgy: A Joint Commission of Catholic Bishops’ Conferences, The Roman Ritual: Revised by Decree of the Second Vatican Ecumenical Council and published by Authority of Pope Paul IV: Order of Christian Funerals: Including Appendix 2: Cremation: Approved for use in the Dioceses of the United States of America by the National Conference of Catholic Bishops and Confirmed by the Apostolic See (New Jersey: Catholic Book Publishing Co., 1998) 275.

 

[5] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 78, No. 3 (July 2016) 529.

[6] n.a., The Roman Missal:  Renewed by Decree of the Most Holy Second Ecumenical Council of the Vatican, Promulgated by Authority of Pope Paul VI and Revised at the Direction of Pope John Paul II:  English Translation According to the Third Typical Edition:  For Use in the Dioceses of the United States of America:  Approved by the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops and Confirmed by the Apostolic See (Washington, DC, United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, 2011) 307.  Personal Notes refers to this book as the Missal.

 

[7] National Conference of Catholic Bishops, The Roman Missal Restored by Decree of the Second Ecumenical Council of the Vatican and Promulgated by Authority of Pope Paul VI: Lectionary for Mass:  For Use in the Dioceses of the United States of America:  Second Typical Edition:  Volume I:  Sundays, Solemnities, Feasts of the Lord and the Saints (Collegeville, Minnesota:  The Liturgical Press, 1988) 346.  Personal Notes refers to this book as the Lectionary.

 

[8] UMI Annual Sunday School Lesson Commentary:  Precepts for Living ®: 2016-2017:  International Sunday School Lessons:  Volume 19:  UMI (Urban Ministries, Inc.), A. Okechuku Ogbonnaya, Ph.D., (ed.) (Chicago, IL  60643: UMI (Urban Ministries, Inc.), 2016) 351-352.

 


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