Easter, the finished product, will never be as much fun as Christmas, the unformed beginning.  Easter is for the mature in Faith, Christmas for the immature.  Easter is for those enduring what Spotlight presents about the social structures in which the Faithful live.  Easter offers hope against hope for those stuck to the Cross, for whatever reason.

 

 

Readings

First Reading:                    Acts 10:34a, 37-43

Responsorial Psalm:          Psalm 118:1-2, 16-17, 22-23 (24)

Second Reading:               Colossians 3:1-4

Alleluia:                             cf. 1 Corinthians 5:7b-8a

Gospel:                             John 20:1-9

 

Annotated Bibliography

Musings above the solid line draw from material below.  Those disinterested in scholarly and tangential details should stop reading here.  If they do, however, they may miss some interesting prayer-provoking details.

 

 

Acts 10:34a, 37-43

Acts 10:34-43

Laurie Brink, O.P., review of Alexander Kyrychenko, The Roman Army and the Expansion of the Gospel:  The Role of the Centurion in Luke-Acts[1]

 

 

Acts 10:34

James H. Evans [sic] Jr., We have been Believers:  An African American Systematic Theology[2]

 

 

Acts 10:41

Daniel B. Wallace, With Scripture, Subject, and Greek Word Indexes: Greek Grammar:  Beyond the Basics: An Exegetical Syntax of the New Testament[3]

 

 

Psalm 118:1-2, 16-17, 22-23 (24)

Psalm 118:1

Johann Baumgart (Pomarius) (1514-1578), “The Gospel on the First Sunday of Advent”[4]

 

 

Psalm 118:22-23

John Boys (1571-1625), “Exposition of Psalm 2”[5]

Boys comments on infallibility.  “If then it (the world) hates Christ in us, it is an infallible sign that we are good soldiers of the Lord, and not servants of the world.”

 

 

Colossians 3:1-4

Col 3:1-17

Bonnie Thurston, review of Christopher R. Seitz, Colossians[6]

Thurston explains, Seitz contends that “Paul communicates Hebrew scriptural thought to gentile readers . . . several interpretive cruxes of the letter, the Christ hymn (1:15-20), the `so-called conflict at Colossae’ (2:8-23) (p. 119), and what is often referred to as “the household code” (3:18—4:1).”

 


 

Col 3:1-2[7]

Girolamo Zanchi (1516-1590), “Theses”

 

John Davenant (1576-1641), “Exposition of Colossians 3:1-2”

 

Davenant, “Exposition of Colossians 3:1-2”

 

Col 3:1

Matthew W. Bates, “A Christology of Incarnation and Enthronement:  Romans 1:3-4 as Unified, Nonadoptionist, and Nonconciliatory”[8]

 

 

Col 3:1[9]

John Calvin (1509-1564), “Commentary on Colossians 3:1”

 

Philipp Melanchthon (1497-1560), “Notes on Paul’s Letter to the Colossians 3:1”

 

Melanchthon, “Notes on Paul’s Letter to the Colossians 3:1”

 

 


 

Col 3:1

Calvin, “Commentary on a Harmony of the Gospels”[10]

Calvin writes, “It is as if he (Christ) would say, `It is absurd and unworthy for those souls whose treasure is in heaven to sink down to earth.’”

 

 

Col 3:3-4

Viktorin Strigel (1524-1569), “Hyponemata in All the Psalms”[11]

Strigel asks how Paul can be lord of Nero, when Nero killed Paul.  Strigel answers “when Christ, who is our life, will be made manifest, then we also will be manifest with him in glory.”  For manifest the Lectionary uses appear.

 

 

Colossians 3:3[12]

Melanchthon, “Notes on Paul’s Letter to the Colossians 2:11-12”

 

Melanchthon, “Notes on Paul’s Letter to the Colossians 3:3”

 

Calvin, “Commentary on Colossians 3:3”

 

Davenant, “Exposition of Colossians 3:3”

 

Melanchthon, “Notes on Paul’s Letter to the Colossians 3:3”

 

 

Colossians 3:4[13]

Davenant, “Exposition of Colossians 3:4”

 

Thomas Cartwright, “Commentary on Colossians 3:4”

 

 

1 Corinthians 5:7

Caspar Huberinus, “A Comforting Sermon on the Resurrection of Christ, Useful for Those Weak in Faith to Read, 1525,” “A Sermon for Easter Sunday on Chapter 16 of the Gospel of Mark.”[14]

 

 

cf. 1 Corinthians 5:7b-8a

1 Corinthians 5:7

Caspar Huberinus, “A Comforting Sermon on the Resurrection of Christ, Useful for Those Weak in Faith to Read, 1525,” “A Sermon for Easter Sunday on Chapter 16 of the Gospel of Mark”[15]

 

1 Corinthians 5:8

Thomas Cranmer, “Original Collects for The Book of Common Prayer, 1549”[16]

 

 

John 20:1-9


 

John 20:2

John Murcot (1625-1654), “Christ’s Willingness to Receive Humble Sinners:  A sermon on John 6:37”[17]

 

 

John 20:3

Calvin, “Commentary on a Harmony of the Gospels”[18]

“Luke greatly magnifies the insensibility of the apostles in rejecting the words of the women, even though Peter had already seen the empty grave and would have been compelled to wonder at a manifest sign of the resurrection”

 

 

Between November 25, 2011 and November 25, 2012, Personal Notes systematically examined the illiterate 2011 Missal.  On April 7, 2013, with Reading 045C 2nd Sunday of Easter_A Catholic Bible Study 130407, Personal Notes systematically began to incorporate material from A Commentary on the Order of Mass of The Roman Missal:  A New English Translation:  Developed under the Auspices of the Catholic Academy of Liturgy, Edward Foley (ed.) (Collegeville, Minnesota:  Liturgical Press, 2011).  The hope is that this approach will help pray with the new Missal, despite itself.  On this Sunday, March 27, 2016 with Reading 042C Easter Sunday A Catholic Bible Study, the tour may be complete.

 

For more on sources see the Appendix file.  A complete set of Personal Notes, dating from the Fifteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time, July 14, 2002 to the present, is on the web site at www.western-civilization.com/CBQ/Personal%20Notes. 

 

 

 

The Responsorial Antiphon for this Sunday is This is the day the Lord has made;  let us rejoice and be glad (Psalm 118:24).[19]

 

In the gobbledygook prayer at Sunday Mass immediately following the forgiveness of sins, the Faithful hearing the 2011 Roman Missal can listen for “unlocked for us the past to eternity.”[20]  For a more thorough examination of the illiterate 2011 Roman Missal, go to 1610 Missal:  Thirty-fourth Sunday in Ordinary Time 121125.pdf/htm at http://www.western-civilization.com/CBQ/Personal%20Notes/Personal%20Notes.htm.

 

This is a call for grace that some Black Baptists bring to mind with And he saith unto them, Be not affrighted:  Ye seek Jesus of Nazareth, which was crucified:  he is risen;  he is not here:  behold the place where they laid him (Mark 16:6).[21] 

 

Addenda

 

Due to greater responsiveness at the National Catholic Reporter blog, beginning with the Fourth Sunday in Lent, Reading 032B, March 15, 2015, my interest began shifting from annotating my index here, to engaging conversation there.  I may keep up the Bibliography, but without further comment.  Time will tell.

 

Raymond Arroyo, “The World Over,” on EWTN uses fear-mongering, rather than the Joy of the Gospel to entrance its viewers.  In the past, Arroyo has responded to my concerns, particularly the Reverend Robert A. Sirico, who rarely appears anymore, with his drivel.  Beginning, May 3, 2015, I intend to begin pointing out, here, the role fear, rather than joy, has in “The World Over.” 

 

Arroyo has written a new book for children, which he advertises week after week.  On Thursday, March 10, 2016 he devoted the whole program to promoting his book.  Part of his book is using fear to entertain young boys, especially.

 

By July 31, 2015 I had identified a pattern of attack on Pope Francis by Arroyo.  The attack is on what the Pope is preaching about climate change and capitalism.  In the United States Republicans have firm opposition to such sermonizing, as the forthcoming campaign for the Republican nomination for President will show . . . or not.

 

As, on June 23, 2015, I prepared Reading 110B for the Seventeenth Sunday in Ordinary time for July 26, I decided to begin reading unread book reviews and articles from Theological Studies for two reasons.  The first is I have already read every article cited in the Catholic Biblical Quarterly.  The second is that traditionally Theological Studies articles have been more helpful to my prayer life.  I also began reading unread book reviews in the Biblical Quarterly and unread sections in Reformation Commentary on Scripture, viz., John and Psalms.

 

As of February 24, 2016, comments for March 6 were ready for Friday, February 26.  Were they handed out then, recipients would have a week in which to prepare to discuss the handout the following Friday, March 4, in time for Sunday Mass, March 6.  This means I intend to begin catching up on other material, like income tax and indexing the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, postponed while recovering from the transition of Marty into the next life.  If I ever get three months out, again, I then intend to reevaluate the amount of energy placed into Personal Notes each week.

 

 



[1] Theological Studies, Vol. 76, No. 4 (December 2015) 837.

 

[2] second edition (Minneapolis:  Fortress Press, 2012) 77 (my copy of the book is missing, March 14, 2016).

 

[3] Grand Rapids: Michigan: Zondervan, 1996, 433, 595.

 

[4] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament III:  Luke, Beth Kreitzer (ed.), general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2015:  ISBN 978-0-8308-2014 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 15) 378 fn. 10.

 

[5] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  Old Testament VII:  Psalms 1—72, Timothy George (ed.), general editor, Scot M. Manetsch, Associate General editor, Herman J. Selderhuis (ed.), (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2015, ISBN 978 0 8308-2957-6 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 15) 22 fn. 14.

 

[6] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 78, No. 1 (January 2016) 175.

 

[7] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament XI:  Philippians, Colossians, Graham Tomlin (ed.) in collaboration with Gregory B. Graybill, general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2013: ISBN 978-0-8308-2974-3 (P 1 Y 13) 100 fn. 46; 210, 211.

 

[8] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 77, No. 1 (January 2015) 125.

 

[9] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament XI:  Philippians, Colossians, Graham Tomlin (ed.) in collaboration with Gregory B. Graybill, general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2013: ISBN 978-0-8308-2974-3 (P 1 Y 13) 208.

 

[10] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament III:  Luke, Beth Kreitzer (ed.), general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2015:  ISBN 978-0-8308-2014 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 15) 269 fn. 13.

 

[11] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament III:  Luke, Beth Kreitzer (ed.), general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2015:  ISBN 978-0-8308-2014 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 15) 368 fn. 14.

 

[12] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament XI:  Philippians, Colossians, Graham Tomlin (ed.) in collaboration with Gregory B. Graybill, general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2013: ISBN 978-0-8308-2974-3 (P 1 Y 13) 188 fn. 34;  213, 214, 215.

 

[13] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament XI:  Philippians, Colossians, Graham Tomlin (ed.) in collaboration with Gregory B. Graybill, general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2013: ISBN 978-0-8308-2974-3 (P 1 Y 13) 215, 216.

 

[14] In Scott H. Hendrix, ed. and trans., Early Protestant Spirituality (New York, Mahwah: Paulist Press, 2009) 115.

 

[15] In Scott H. Hendrix, ed. and trans., Early Protestant Spirituality (New York, Mahwah: Paulist Press, 2009) 115.

 

[16] In Scott H. Hendrix, ed. and trans., Early Protestant Spirituality (New York, Mahwah: Paulist Press, 2009) 224.

 

[17] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament IV:  John 1—12, Craig S. Farmer (ed.), general editor, Timothy George, Associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch (ed.), (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2014, ISBN 978 0 8308-2967-5 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 14) 225 fn. 33.

 

[18] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament III:  Luke, Beth Kreitzer (ed.), general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2015:  ISBN 978-0-8308-2014 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 15) 480 fn. 10.

 

[19] National Conference of Catholic Bishops, The Roman Missal Restored by Decree of the Second Ecumenical Council of the Vatican and Promulgated by Authority of Pope Paul VI: Lectionary for Mass:  For Use in the Dioceses of the United States of America:  Second Typical Edition:  Volume I:  Sundays, Solemnities, Feasts of the Lord and the Saints (Collegeville, Minnesota:  The Liturgical Press, 1988) 346.  Personal Notes refers to this book as the Lectionary.

 

[20] n.a., The Roman Missal:  Renewed by Decree of the Most Holy Second Ecumenical Council of the Vatican, Promulgated by Authority of Pope Paul VI and Revised at the Direction of Pope John Paul II:  English Translation According to the Third Typical Edition:  For Use in the Dioceses of the United States of America:  Approved by the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops and Confirmed by the Apostolic See (Washington, DC, United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, 2011) 387.  Personal Notes refers to this book as the Missal.

 

[21] UMI Annual Sunday School Lesson Commentary:  Precepts for Living ®: 2013-2014:  International Sunday School Lessons:  Volume 165:  UMI (Urban Ministries, Inc.), a. Okechuku Ogbonnaya, Ph.D., (ed.) (Chicago, IL  60643: UMI (Urban Ministries, Inc.), 2013) 31-332.