There seems to be a new theology of community engaging scholars.  Rather than a one-to-one approach between individuals and God, there is a more important group relationship finding recognition.  This is a type of theology of the Trinity.  Three persons in one God form their own community, thereby giving meaning to human communities, particularly Church communities.  These communities are present and without the Papacy and without Papal delegates, ordained or not.

 

 

Readings

First Reading:                    Joshua 5:9a, 10-12

Responsorial Psalm:          Psalm 34:2-3, 4-5, 6-7 (9a)

Second Reading:               2 Corinthians 5:17-21

Alleluia:                             Luke 15:18

Gospel:                             Luke 15:1-3, 11-32

 

Annotated Bibliography

Musings above the solid line draw from material below.  Those disinterested in scholarly and tangential details should stop reading here.  If they do, however, they may miss some interesting prayer-provoking details.

 

 

Joshua 5:9a, 10-12

 

 

Psalm 34:2-3, 4-5, 6-7 (9a)

Care for the Sick uses Psalm 34, Part III: Readings, Responses, and Verses from Sacred Scripture: Responsorial Psalms E God is the salvation of those who trust in him, page 286 and Mass for Viaticum: Responsorial Psalms B, page 324.[1]

 


 

Psalm 34:1-4

Johann Baumgart (Pomarius) (1514-1578), “Gospel on the Nineteenth Sunday after Trinity”[2]

Since I had already read this section of Luke, there is no further breakdown.  If someone finds Baumgart interesting, they may look up the reference.

 

Psalm 34:6

Nikolaus Selnecker, “The Whole Psalter”[3]

“To seek the Lord means to allow ourselves to be comforted by the Word of God (in the Liturgy of the Word) and firmly cling to the promises of God and call on him and invite him or, as it stands here, look to him and run to him and besiege and beleaguer him with diligent prayer . . .  or, Look to him that you may be radiant with joy as Psalm 34:6 puts it.

 

 

2 Corinthians 5:17-21

2 Cor 5:16-21

Bruce T. Morrill, S.J., “Sign of Reconciliation and Conversion?  Differing Views of Power—Ecclesial, Sacramental, Anthropological—among Hierarchy and Laity[4]

The differing views ae between theologian Monika Hellwig and Saint Pope John Paul II.  Hellwig follows historical development; JPII follows protecting the institutional power and authority of the Papacy.  Hellwig finds reconciliation more of a communal affair; JPII, in contrast, insists on auricular individual confession to a priest. 

 

 


 

2 Corinthians 5:17

Luther (1483-1546), “Twenty-third Sunday after Trinity”[5]

 

 

2 Cor 5:18—6:2

Michael A. Lyons, “Psalm 22 and the `Servants’ of Isaiah 54; 56—66”[6]

 

 

2 Corinthians 5:18-19

Anscar J. Chupungco, “The ICEL2010 Translation”[7]

 

 

2 Corinthians 5:18

Caspar Schwenckfeld, “A Letter of Caspar Schwenckfeld concerning the Course of the Word of God, March 4, 1527”[8]

 

 

2 Corinthians 5:19-21

David Power, “Theology of the Latin Text and Rite”[9]

 

 


 

2 Corinthians 5:19-21

Pilgram Marpeck (c. 1495-1556), “Judgment and Decision”[10]

 

 

2 Corinthians 5:19

Daniel B. Wallace, With Scripture, Subject, and Greek Word Indexes: Greek Grammar:  Beyond the Basics: An Exegetical Syntax of the New Testament[11]

 

2 Corinthians 5:19

Dirk Philips (1504-1568), “The Enchiridion:  Concerning the True Knowledge of Jesus Christ”[12]

 

 

2 Corinthians 5:20

Justus Jonas (1493-1555), “Brief Exegesis of Acts 9:15-16”[13]

 

 

2 Corinthians 5:21

Urbanus Rhegius, “Apothecary of the Soul for the Healthy and the Sick in These Dangerous Times, 1529”

 

 

2 Corinthians 5:21

Richard Hooker (c. 1553-1600), “Sermon:  Grace and Righteousness (Phil 3:8)”[14]

 

 

2 Corinthians 5:21

Martin Luther (1483-1546), “Glossa on Psalm 38 (1513-1515)” [15]

“And according to Augustine, Christ and the church are one flesh as husband and wife.  How wonderful it is that they have one tongue, the same words, since they are of one flesh, one body and, of course, one head!”  For our sake he made him to be sin who did not know sin, so that we might become the righteousness of God in him (2 Corinthians 2:21).

 

2 Corinthians 5:21[16]

Johannes Brenz (1499-1570), “Commentary on John 1:14”

 

 

Caspar Cruciger (1504-1548), “Commentary on John 1:29”

 

 

2 Cor 5:21

Harvey D. Egan, S.J., review of Jack Mahoney, Christianity in Evolution:  An Exploration[17]

 

 

 

Luke 15:18

 

 

Luke 15:1-3, 11-32

The Church uses this Gospel in caring for the sick.[18]

 

Luke 15:1-2

Baumgart, “Gospel on the Fifth Sunday after Trinity”

“Pride and presumption do nothing good, but rather throw all social classes into confusion.  This Gospel draws attention to class conflict.

 

 

Luke 15:1

The English Annotations (1645, 1651, 1657), “Annotations upon the Gospel According to Saint Luke 15:1”

“They came to Christ, who preached to them the comforting doctrine of justification by faith . . . That is why this teaching is called `glad tidings.’”  Bishop Walter F. Sullivan of Richmond, Virginia, called his weekly column “Glad Tidings.”

 

Luke 15:2

Bernard P. Prusak, “Explaining Eucharistic `Real Presence’:  Moving beyond a Medieval Conundrum[19]

 

 

Luke 15:11-32

James H. Evans [sic] Jr., We have been Believers:  An African American Systematic Theology[20]

 

 

Luke 15:11-24

“Encyclical Letter Lumen Fidei of the Supreme Pontiff Francis to the Bishops, Priests, and deacons [sic] and lay Faithful on Faith”[21]

 

 

Luke 15:11-24

Baumgart, “Seventeenth Sunday after Trinity”[22]

 

 

Luke 15:17

Desiderius Erasmus (1466-1536), “Paraphrase on the Gospel of Luke 15:17”

“Thus he (the Prodigal Son) had not come into extreme misfortune, but it isw a happy misfortune which forces a person to come to his senses.”

 

 

Between November 25, 2011 and November 25, 2012, Personal Notes systematically examined the illiterate 2011 Missal.  On April 7, 2013, with Reading 045C 2nd Sunday of Easter_A Catholic Bible Study 130407, Personal Notes systematically began to incorporate material from A Commentary on the Order of Mass of The Roman Missal:  A New English Translation:  Developed under the Auspices of the Catholic Academy of Liturgy, Edward Foley (ed.) (Collegeville, Minnesota:  Liturgical Press, 2011).  The hope is that this approach will help pray with the new Missal, despite itself.

 

 

For more on sources see the Appendix file.  A complete set of Personal Notes, dating from the Fifteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time, July 14, 2002 to the present, is on the web site at www.western-civilization.com/CBQ/Personal%20Notes

 

 

 

The Responsorial Antiphon for this Sunday is Taste and see the goodness of the Lord (Psalm 34:9a).[23]  Protestant revolutionaries do not note the mixed metaphor, between tasting and seeing.

 

In the gobbledygook prayer at Sunday Mass immediately following the forgiveness of sins, the Faithful hearing the 2011 Roman Missal can listen for “reconcile the human race to yourself.”[24]  For a more thorough examination of the illiterate 2011 Roman Missal, go to 0260 Missal 2nd Sunday_of_Lent_A Catholic Bible Study 120304.docx.

 

This is a call for grace that some Black Baptists bring to mind with And he said unto them, This kind can come forth by nothing, but by prayer and fasting (Mark 9:29).[25] 

 

Addenda

 

As, on June 23, 2015, I prepared Reading 110B for the Seventeenth Sunday in Ordinary time for July 26, I decided to begin reading unread book reviews and articles from Theological Studies for two reasons.  The first is I have already read every article cited in the Catholic Biblical Quarterly.  The second is that traditionally Theological Studies articles have been more helpful to my prayer life.  I also began reading unread book reviews in the Biblical Quarterly and unread sections in Reformation Commentary on Scripture, viz., John and Psalms.

 

 

 



[1] International Commission on English in the Liturgy: A Joint Commission of Catholic Bishops’ Conferences, The Roman Ritual: Revised by Decree of the Second Vatican Ecumenical Council and Published by Authority of Pope Paul VI: Pastoral Care of the Sick: Rites of Anointing and Viaticum: Approved for Use in the Dioceses of the United States of America by the National Conference of Catholic Bishops and Confirmed by the Apostolic See (New York: Catholic Book Publishing Co., 1983) 296.

 

[2] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament III:  Luke, Beth Kreitzer (ed.), general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2015:  ISBN 978-0-8308-2014 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 15) 121 fn. 10.

 

[3] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  Old Testament VII:  Psalms 1—72, Timothy George (ed.), general editor, Scot M. Manetsch, Associate General editor, Herman J. Selderhuis (ed.), (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2015, ISBN 978 0 8308-2957-6 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 15) 271 fn. 9.

 

[4] Theological Studies, Vol. 75, No. 3 (September 2014) 588.

 

[5] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament XI:  Philippians, Colossians, Graham Tomlin (ed.) in collaboration with Gregory B. Graybill, general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2013: ISBN 978-0-8308-2974-3 (P 1 Y 13) 96 fn. 33.

 

[6] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 77, No. 4 (October 2015) 655.

 

[7] in A Commentary on the Order of Mass of The Roman Missal:  A New English Translation:  Developed under the Auspices of the Catholic Academy of Liturgy, Edward Foley (ed.) (Collegeville, Minnesota:  Liturgical Press, 2011) 378.

 

[8] In Scott H. Hendrix, ed. and trans., Early Protestant Spirituality (New York, Mahwah: Paulist Press, 2009) 54.

 

[9] in A Commentary on the Order of Mass of The Roman Missal:  A New English Translation:  Developed under the Auspices of the Catholic Academy of Liturgy, Edward Foley (ed.) (Collegeville, Minnesota:  Liturgical Press, 2011) 369.

 

[10] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament XI:  Philippians, Colossians, Graham Tomlin (ed.) in collaboration with Gregory B. Graybill, general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2013: ISBN 978-0-8308-2974-3 (P 1 Y 13) 196 fn. 58.

 

[11] Grand Rapids: Michigan: Zondervan, 1996, 647.

 

[12] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  Old Testament VII:  Psalms 1—72, Timothy George (ed.), general editor, Scot M. Manetsch, Associate General editor, Herman J. Selderhuis (ed.), (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2015, ISBN 978 0 8308-2957-6 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 15) 179 fn. 30.

 

[13] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament VI:  Acts, Esther Chung-Kim and Todd R. Hains (eds.), general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2014:  ISBN 978-0-8308-2969-9 (print) P 1 Y 14) 125 fn. 24.

 

[14] Citation lost February 22, 2016

 

[15] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament XI:  Philippians, Colossians, Graham Tomlin (ed.) in collaboration with Gregory B. Graybill, general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2013: ISBN 978-0-8308-2974-3 (P 1 Y 13) 78 fn. 23.

 

[16] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament IV:  John 1—12, Craig S. Farmer (ed.), general editor, Timothy George, Associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch (ed.), (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2014, ISBN 978 0 8308-2967-5 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 14) 29 fn. 57, 49 fn. 1.

 

[17] Theological Studies, Vol. 74, No. 2 (June 2013) 493.

 

[18] The Roman Ritual: Revised by Decree of the Second Vatican Ecumenical Council and Published by Authority of Pope Paul VI: Pastoral Care of the Sick: Rites of Anointing and Viaticum: Approved for use in the dioceses of the United States of America by the National Conference of Catholic Bishops and Confirmed by the Apostolic See: Prepared by International Commission on English in the Liturgy: a Joint Commission of Catholic Bishops’ Conferences (New York: Catholic Book Publishing Co. 1983) 317.

 

[19] Theological Studies, Vol. 75, No. 2 (June 2014) 231.

 

[20] second edition (Minneapolis:  Fortress Press, 2012) 180 (book missing since Feb. 20, 2016.

 

[21] L’Osservatore Romano: Weekly Edition in English, Vol. 46, No. 28 (2013), Vatican City Wednesday, 10 July, paragraph 19, page 14/23.

 

[22] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament III:  Luke, Beth Kreitzer (ed.), general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2015:  ISBN 978-0-8308-2014 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 15) 297 fn. 10.

 

[23] National Conference of Catholic Bishops, The Roman Missal Restored by Decree of the Second Ecumenical Council of the Vatican and Promulgated by Authority of Pope Paul VI: Lectionary for Mass:  For Use in the Dioceses of the United States of America:  Second Typical Edition:  Volume I:  Sundays, Solemnities, Feasts of the Lord and the Saints (Collegeville, Minnesota:  The Liturgical Press, 1988) 159.  Personal Notes refers to this book as the Lectionary.

 

[24] n.a., The Roman Missal:  Renewed by Decree of the Most Holy Second Ecumenical Council of the Vatican, Promulgated by Authority of Pope Paul VI and Revised at the Direction of Pope John Paul II:  English Translation According to the Third Typical Edition:  For Use in the Dioceses of the United States of America:  Approved by the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops and Confirmed by the Apostolic See (Washington, DC, United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, 2011) 246.  Personal Notes refers to this book as the Missal.

 

[25] UMI Annual Sunday School Lesson Commentary:  Precepts for Living ®: 2013-2014:  International Sunday School Lessons:  Volume 165:  UMI (Urban Ministries, Inc.), a. Okechuku Ogbonnaya, Ph.D., (ed.) (Chicago, IL  60643: UMI (Urban Ministries, Inc.), 2013) 299-300.