The approach for the readings this Sunday is to pray for Wisdom to understand that the Creator of all things, visible and invisible has to be somewhat responsible for the confusion in which the Faithful find themselves.  The Faithful love in an age in which they can destroy all earthly creation with a nuclear holocaust.  In the meantime, the Faithful have to deal with purported climate change and the evils of capitalism and impracticalities of socialism, all in the context of a presidential election.  The Faithful can wonder what the effect of democratic governance would be on the Roman Catholic Church, democratic rather than monarchic.

 

 

Readings

First Reading:                    Exodus 3:1-8a, 13-15

Responsorial Psalm:          Psalm 103:1-2, 3-4, 6-7, 8, 11 (8a)

Second Reading:               1 Corinthians 10:1-6, 10-12

Alleluia:                             Matthew 4:17

Gospel:                             Luke 13:1-9

 

Annotated Bibliography

Musings above the solid line draw from material below.  Those disinterested in scholarly and tangential details should stop reading here.  If they do, however, they may miss some interesting prayer-provoking details.

 

 

Exodus 3:1-8a, 13-15

Exodus 3:1-17

James H. Evans [sic] Jr., We have been Believers:  An African American Systematic Theology[1]

 

 

Exodus 3:6

Patrick Regan, “Theology of the Latin Text and Rite”[2]

 

 

Exodus 3:6

John Calvin (1509-1564), “Commentary on a Harmony of the Gospels”

 

 

Exod 3:6

Hyun Chul Paul Kim, “Reading the Joseph Story (Genesis 37—50) as a Diaspora Narrative”[3]

 

 

Exod 3:6

Matthew Thiessen, “A Buried Pentateuchal Allusion to the Resurrection in Mark 12:25”[4]

 

 

Exod 3:6

Francis M. Macatangay, “Election by Allusion:  Exodus Themes in the Book of Tobit”[5]

 

 

Exodus 3:7-8, 10

Pope Francis, The Joy of the Gospel[6]

 

 

Exodus 3:10

Pope Francis, The Joy of the Gospel[7]

 

 

Exodus 3:14

Calvin, “Commentary on John 8:58”[8]

 

 

Exodus 3:15

Psalm 30:4 Sing praises to the LORD, O you his saints, and give thanks to his holy name relates to Exodus 3:15, This is my name forever; thus am I to be remembered through all generations.[9]

 

 

Psalm 103:1-2, 3-4, 6-7, 8, 11 (8a)

Psalm 103:1

Desiderius Erasmus (1466-1536), “An Ecclesiasticall [sic] Exposition upon Saint Luke”[10]

 

 

Psalm 103:3

Elizabeth E. Shively, review of Michael Tait, Jesus, the Divine Bridegroom, in Mark 2:18-22:  Mark’s Christology Upgraded[11]

 

 

Psalm 103:8

St. Thérèse of Lisieux, The Story of a Soul:  A New Translation[12]

 

 

 

1 Corinthians 10:1-6, 10-12

1 Cor 10:1-11

Edward Kessler, “`I am Joseph, Your Brother’:  A Jewish Perspective on Christian-Jewish Relations Since Nostra Aetate No. 4”[13]

 

 

1 Cor 10:1-5

Florence Morgan Gillman, review of Tom Holland, Romans:  The Divine Marriage, A Biblical Theological Commentary[14]

 

 

1 Corinthians 10:1-2

Antonius Broickwy von Königstein (1470-1541), “Commentary on John 3:10”[15]

 

 

1 Corinthians 10:1

Daniel B. Wallace, With Scripture, Subject, and Greek Word Indexes: Greek Grammar:  Beyond the Basics: An Exegetical Syntax of the New Testament[16]

 

 

1 Corinthians 10:2-4

Belgic Confession (1561), “Article 34, `Of Holy Baptism’”[17]

 

 

1 Corinthians 10:4

Patrick Regan, “Theology of the Latin Text and Rite”[18]

 

 

1 Corinthians 10:6

Luther, “House Postil for Pentecost (1544)”[19]

 

 

1 Corinthians 10:11

Martin Luther (1483-1546), “Second Psalms Lectures (1519-1521):  On the Name of God, Tetragrammaton”[20]

Luther writes, “The meaning of the Tetragrammaton is this:  yodh (“origin”), he (“this), waw (“and”), he (“this”).  Were these to be constructed grammatically and in Latin, this sentence will result:  “The Origin of This and This.”  Luther goes on and on to find four letters pointing to Three Persons in One God.

 

 

1 Corinthians 10:12

Ulrich Zwingli, “Letter to Oswald Myconius, July 24, 1520”[21]

 

 

Matthew 4:17

 

 

Luke 13:1-9

Luke 13:1

Luther, “Exegesis of Psalm 23 at Table”[22]

Luther writes, “Moses is harsh and unfriendly toward his sheep.  He drives them away into the desert, where they will find neither pasture nor water but only want.  Christ, however, is the good, friendly Shepherd who goes after a famished and lost sheep in the wilderness . . . “

 

 

Luke 13:2-5

Luther, “First Psalms Lectures (1513-1515)[23]

Luther views Psalm 5:4-6 from the perspective of Luke 13:2-5.  Luther writes, Do you think that only these above others were sinners in Jerusalem, because they suffered this?  Truly, I say to you, unless you repent, you will all likewise perish.

 

 

François Lambert (1487-1530), “Commentary in Luke 13:2”[24]

Lambert writes, “But those are truly happy who carry their cross daily and who are scourged and chastises `in the early morning,’ that is, those who are justified by faith from the beginning.”

 

 

Luke 13:6

Nehemiah Rogers (1593-1660), “Annotations upon the Gospel According to Saint Luke 13:6’[25]

 

 

Luke 13:8-9

John Mayer (1583-1664), “A Commentary on the New Testament, Luke 13:8-9”[26]

 

 

Between November 25, 2011 and November 25, 2012, Personal Notes systematically examined the illiterate 2011 Missal.  On April 7, 2013, with Reading 045C 2nd Sunday of Easter_A Catholic Bible Study 130407, Personal Notes systematically began to incorporate material from A Commentary on the Order of Mass of The Roman Missal:  A New English Translation:  Developed under the Auspices of the Catholic Academy of Liturgy, Edward Foley (ed.) (Collegeville, Minnesota:  Liturgical Press, 2011).  The hope is that this approach will help pray with the new Missal, despite itself.

 

 

For more on sources see the Appendix file.  A complete set of Personal Notes, dating from the Fifteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time, July 14, 2002 to the present, is on the web site at www.western-civilization.com/CBQ/Personal%20Notes. 

 

 

 

The Responsorial Antiphon for this Sunday is The Lord is kind and merciful (Psalm 103:8a).[27]

 

In the gobbledygook prayer at Sunday Mass immediately following the forgiveness of sins, the Faithful hearing the 2011 Roman Missal can listen for “author of every mercy and all goodness.”[28]  For a more thorough examination of the illiterate 2011 Roman Missal, go to 0260 Missal 2nd Sunday_of_Lent_A Catholic Bible Study 120304.docx.

 

This is a call for grace that some Black Baptists bring to mind with Ye shall dwell in booths seven days; all that are Israelites born shall dwell in booths:  That your generations may know that I made the children of Israel to dwell in booths, when I brought them out of the land of Egypt:  I am the LORD your God. (Leviticus 23:42-43.[29] 

 

Addenda

 

Due to greater responsiveness at the National Catholic Reporter blog, beginning with the Fourth Sunday in Lent, Reading 032B, March 15, 2015, my interest began shifting from annotating my index here, to engaging conversation there.  I am keeping up the Bibliography, but with limited further comment. 

 

Raymond Arroyo, “The World Over,” on EWTN uses fear-mongering, rather than the Joy of the Gospel to entrance its viewers.  In the past, Arroyo has responded to my concerns, particularly the Reverend Robert A. Sirico, who rarely appears anymore, with his drivel.  Beginning, May 3, 2015, I began pointing out, here, the role fear, rather than joy, has in “The World Over.” 

 

On Thursday, February 18 Arroyo showed Pope Francis angry as he fell onto someone in a wheelchair.  No one was hurt.  The Pope had lost his balance. 

A Ukrainian Archbishop complained that he was not consulted before Pope Francis issued a joint declaration with Patriarch Krill.

 

By July 31, I had identified a pattern of attack on Pope Francis by Arroyo.  The attack is on what the Pope is preaching about climate change and capitalism.  In the United States Republicans have firm opposition to such sermonizing, as the forthcoming campaign for the Republican nomination for President will show . . . or not.

 

As, on June 23, 2015, I prepared Reading 110B for the Seventeenth Sunday in Ordinary time for July 26, I decided to begin reading unread book reviews and articles from Theological Studies for two reasons.  The first is I have already read every article cited in the Catholic Biblical Quarterly.  The second is that traditionally Theological Studies articles have been more helpful to my prayer life.  I also began reading unread book reviews in the Biblical Quarterly and unread sections in Reformation Commentary on Scripture, viz., John and Psalms.

 

 

 



[1] second edition (Minneapolis:  Fortress Press, 2012) 13 (personal book missing).

 

[2] in A Commentary on the Order of Mass of The Roman Missal:  A New English Translation:  Developed under the Auspices of the Catholic Academy of Liturgy, Edward Foley (ed.) (Collegeville, Minnesota:  Liturgical Press, 2011) 215.

 

[3] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 75, No. 2 (April 2013) 225.

 

[4] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 76, No. 2 (April 2014) 274,

 

[5] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 76, No. 3 (July 2014) 456.

 

[6] Erlanger, Kentucky:  Libreria Editrice Vaticana, DynamicCatholic.com, 2014, 146.

 

[7] Erlanger, Kentucky:  Libreria Editrice Vaticana, DynamicCatholic.com, 2014, 23.

 

[8] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament IV:  John 1—12, Craig S. Farmer (ed.), general editor, Timothy George, Associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch (ed.), (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2014, ISBN 978 0 8308-2967-5 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 14) 333 fn. 15.

 

[9] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  Old Testament VII:  Psalms 1—72, Timothy George (ed.), general editor, Scot M. Manetsch, Associate General editor, Herman J. Selderhuis (ed.), (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2015, ISBN 978 0 8308-2957-6 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 15) 230 translator’s note b.

 

[10] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament III:  Luke, Beth Kreitzer (ed.), general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2015:  ISBN 978-0-8308-2014 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 15) 27 fn. 2.

 

[11] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 74, No. 4 (October 2012) 833.

 

[12] Robert J. Edmonson, CJ, (translator) (Brewster, Massachusetts: Paraclete Press, 2006) 4, 239.

 

[13] Theological Studies, Vol. 74, No. 1 (March 2013) 62.

 

[14] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 75, No. 4 (October 2013) 802.

 

[15] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament IV:  John 1—12, Craig S. Farmer (ed.), general editor, Timothy George, Associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch (ed.), (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2014, ISBN 978 0 8308-2967-5 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 14) 99 fn. 32.

 

[16] Grand Rapids: Michigan: Zondervan, 1996, 526.

 

[17] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament XI:  Philippians, Colossians, Graham Tomlin (ed.) in collaboration with Gregory B. Graybill, general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2013: ISBN 978-0-8308-2974-3 (P 1 Y 13) 190.

 

[18] in A Commentary on the Order of Mass of The Roman Missal:  A New English Translation:  Developed under the Auspices of the Catholic Academy of Liturgy, Edward Foley (ed.) (Collegeville, Minnesota:  Liturgical Press, 2011) 216.

 

[19] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament VI:  Acts, Esther Chung-Kim and Todd R. Hains (eds.), general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2014:  ISBN 978-0-8308-2969-9 (print) P 1 Y 14) 19 fn. 4.

 

[20] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  Old Testament VII:  Psalms 1—72, Timothy George (ed.), general editor, Scot M. Manetsch, Associate General editor, Herman J. Selderhuis (ed.), (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2015, ISBN 978 0 8308-2957-6 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 15) 54 fn. 13.

 

[21] In Scott H. Hendrix, ed. and trans., Early Protestant Spirituality (New York, Mahwah: Paulist Press, 2009) 14.

 

[22] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  Old Testament VII:  Psalms 1—72, Timothy George (ed.), general editor, Scot M. Manetsch, Associate General editor, Herman J. Selderhuis (ed.), (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2015, ISBN 978 0 8308-2957-6 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 15) 189 fn. 5.

 

[23] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  Old Testament VII:  Psalms 1—72, Timothy George (ed.), general editor, Scot M. Manetsch, Associate General editor, Herman J. Selderhuis (ed.), (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2015, ISBN 978 0 8308-2957-6 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 15) 48 fn. 14.

 

[24] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament III:  Luke, Beth Kreitzer (ed.), general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2015:  ISBN 978-0-8308-2014 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 15) 280.

 

[25] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament III:  Luke, Beth Kreitzer (ed.), general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2015:  ISBN 978-0-8308-2014 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 15) 281.

 

[26] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament III:  Luke, Beth Kreitzer (ed.), general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2015:  ISBN 978-0-8308-2014 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 15) 282.

 

[27] National Conference of Catholic Bishops, The Roman Missal Restored by Decree of the Second Ecumenical Council of the Vatican and Promulgated by Authority of Pope Paul VI: Lectionary for Mass:  For Use in the Dioceses of the United States of America:  Second Typical Edition:  Volume I:  Sundays, Solemnities, Feasts of the Lord and the Saints (Collegeville, Minnesota:  The Liturgical Press, 1988) 188.  Personal Notes refers to this book as the Lectionary.

 

[28] n.a., The Roman Missal:  Renewed by Decree of the Most Holy Second Ecumenical Council of the Vatican, Promulgated by Authority of Pope Paul VI and Revised at the Direction of Pope John Paul II:  English Translation According to the Third Typical Edition:  For Use in the Dioceses of the United States of America:  Approved by the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops and Confirmed by the Apostolic See (Washington, DC, United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, 2011) 236.  Personal Notes refers to this book as the Missal.

 

[29] UMI Annual Sunday School Lesson Commentary:  Precepts for Living ®: 2013-2014:  International Sunday School Lessons:  Volume 165:  UMI (Urban Ministries, Inc.), a. Okechuku Ogbonnaya, Ph.D., (ed.) (Chicago, IL  60643: UMI (Urban Ministries, Inc.), 2013) 279-280.