This is the first time Personal Notes reflect a second time over scriptures already seen.  My intention is to build upon the previous Notes without including those Notes, unless requested.  Up until this point, I wrote these Notes primarily for myself, relatively unconcerned about their length or internal coherence.

 

The New Hope Community web site, http://www.hopeonline.cc, recommends two Bibles, at Groups, Soul Journ: The New Living Translation and English Standard Version, neither of which have I been using.  Should New Hope want me to use their translations, I will, but, in the meantime, that may not be necessary.

 

What holds Epiphany together is revelation to the Gentiles, namely the non-Jewish Faithful. Epiphany is an opening of the Word of God to the peoples of the world, unabashedly, without self-centered self-righteousness, but with genuine concern to return everything back to the right order of the original creation.

 

Isaiah 60:1-6

 

verse 2         See, darkness covers the earth,

                               and thick clouds cover the peoples.

 

The Vulgate (circa 410):               populos

 

Douay-Rheims (1582-1610):         people

 

King James (1611):                      people

 

Jerusalem (1966):                        peoples

 

New American (1970):                  peoples

 

New Jerusalem (1985):                peoples

 

Peoples are the Faithful over whom the LORD now shines.

 

verse 3a        Nations shall walk by your light

 

The Vulgate (circa 410):               gentes

 

Douay-Rheims (1582-1610):         Gentiles

 

King James (1611):                      Gentiles

 

Jerusalem (1966):                        nations

 

New American (1970):                  nations

 

New Jerusalem (1985):                nations

 

Gentiles is more specific about the present Faithful.

 

Psalm 72:1-2, 7-8, 10-11, 12-13

 

This royal Psalm may date from between the first and second exile, mid-way between 721 and 587 B.C.[1]  Letting the power of the Almighty be known to the Faithful was never meant to be only an interior matter of the heart. The Psalmist promises that everyone shall know that God rules.

 

The Lectionary uses this passage in the following places:

 

Readings      Page in         Verses used

                     Lectionary

 

  4A              19-20            1-2, 7-8, 12-13, 17 (cf.   7) Second Sunday of Advent A.

20ABC            119            1-2, 7-8, 12-13       (cf. 11) The readings for today.

 

verse 2a        he shall govern your people with justice

 

The Vulgate (circa 410):               populum

 

Douay-Rheims (1582-1610):         people (Psalm 71)

There is disagreement over the exact numbering of the Psalms.

 

King James (1611):                      people

 

Jerusalem (1966):                        people

 

New American (1970):                  people

 

New Jerusalem (1985):                people

 

The Responsorial makes the point nicely, “Lord, every nation on earth will adore you.” Reaching out to every nation suits the evangelical purpose of Christianity.

 

Ephesians 3:2-3a, 5-6

 

verse 5a        It was not made known to people in other generations

 

The Vulgate (circa 410):               quod aliis generationibus non innotuit filiis hominum

 

Douay-Rheims (1582-1610):         in other generations to the sons of men

 

King James (1611):                      in other ages was not made known unto the sons of

                                                   men

 

Jerusalem (1966):                        to any men in past generations

 

New American (1970):                  to human beings in other generations

This translation is a rare difference from the Lectionary.

 

New Jerusalem (1985):                to humanity in previous generations

 

Not only are the Faithful receiving the Word, but they are also bound to evangelize with the Word.

 

verse 6         that the Gentiles are coheirs, members of the same body,

                     and copartners in the promise in Christ Jesus through the gospel.

 

Matthew 2:2

 

Matthew 2:1-12

 

verse 4         Assembling all the chief priests and the scribes of the people,

                               he inquired of them where the Christ was to be born.

 

The Vulgate (circa 410):               populi

 

Douay-Rheims (1582-1610):         people

 

King James (1611):                      people

 

Jerusalem (1966):                        people

 

New American (1970):                  people

 

New Jerusalem (1985):                people

Secular authorities, such as Herod, may well ask where Christ is born. Part of the answer is in the hearts of the Faithful.

 

verse 6         And you, Bethlehem, land of Judah,

                               are by no means least among the rulers of Judah;

                     since from you shall come a ruler,

                               who is to shepherd my people Israel.

 

The Vulgate (circa 410):               reget

 

Douay-Rheims (1582-1610):         rule

 

King James (1611):                      rule

 

Jerusalem (1966):                        shepherd

 

New American (1970):                  shepherd

 

New Jerusalem (1985):                shepherd

 

Shepherd carries a kindlier connotation than rule.  Evangelists, as part of the Magisterium of the Church teaching the Gospel, do better to shepherd than rule the Faithful.

 

Epiphany is an opening of the Word of God to the peoples of the world, unabashedly, without self-centered self-righteousness, but with genuine concern to return everything back to the right order of the original creation.  The approach is one of a shepherd rather than a ruler; one bringing light to the confusions of life.  The Epiphany approach is more than simply the interior life.  Epiphany is also an expansion of the interior to the exterior so that all nations may come to know and accept the Gospel.

 

 

For more on sources, besides the footnotes, see the Appendix file for changes made this week.



[1] J. J. M. Roberts, “The Enthronement of Yhwh and David: The Abiding Theological Significance of the Kingship Language of the Psalms,” the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 64, No. 4 (October 2002) 683.