This is a weird, weird, twice weird Solemnity.  All Solemnity means is the highest rank in the liturgical calendar.  Mary is being honored at the same level as the Blessed Trinity.  But not worshipped.  Of course.  This used to be the Feast of the Circumcision.  Whatever it may be the liturgists are up to, what is being celebrated and just how escapes me.  Such may be the case with others of the Faithful, too.  When January 1 lands on a week day the care for availability of Christmas Masses is not so much.  It does, however, make sense to mark the trips around the sun, especially in the context of beginning all over again, “to sing a new song” as the Psalmists often put it, but not in these prayers.

 

 

Readings

First Reading:                    Numbers 6:22-27

Responsorial Psalm:          Psalm 67:2-3, 5, 6, 8 (2a)

Second Reading:               Galatians 4:4-7

Alleluia                              Hebrews 1:1-2

Gospel:                             Luke 2:16-21

 

Annotated Bibliography

Musings above the solid line draw from material below.  Those disinterested in scholarly and tangential details should stop reading here.  If they do, however, they may miss some interesting prayer-provoking details.

 

 

Numbers 6:22-27

Numbers 6:22-26

Jeremy Schipper, review of Sandra Jacobs, The Body as Property:  Physical Disfigurement in Biblical Law[1]

While Schipper is impressed with the command Jacobs has of Mesopotamian and rabbinic material, he is unimpressed with the uses she makes of these sources.  I found her focus on circumcision as a “physical disfigurement” and on slaves interesting.

 

Num 6:24-26

Michael Morris, “Deuteronomy in the Matthean and Lucan Temptation in Light of Early Jewish Antidemonic Tradition”[2]

 

 

Psalm 67:2-3, 5, 6, 8 (2a)

Psalm 67:2-3, 5, 6, 8[3]

Rudolf Gwalther (1530-1590)

 

Nikolaus Selnecker (1530-1592)

 

The English Annotations (1645, 1651, 1657)

 

Sebastian Münster (1489-1552)

 

John Calvin (1509-1564)

 

Selnecker

 

David Dickson (1583?-1663)

 

Calvin

 

Martin Bucer (1491-1551)

 

Selnecker

 

Martin Luther (1483-1546)

 

 

Galatians 4:4-7


 

Gal 4:1-11

Thomas D. Stegman, S.J., review of Robert Ewusie Moses, Practices of Power:  Revisiting the Principality and Powers in the Pauline Letters[4]

Stegman concludes, “While he (Moses) frequently mentions the formation of a Christian habitus, he does not cover the quotidian practices involved to cultivate it (e.g., prayer and teaching).  Nevertheless, this volume is well worth reading.”

 

Gal 4:4-7

Julien Smith, review of Wesley Hill, Paul and the Trinity:  Persons, Relations, and the Pauline Letters[5]

Smith reports, “the cumulative weigh of H.’s argument, executed carefully, clearly, and persuasively, strongly recommends the exegetical utility of a different metaphor—a web or matrix of relations rather than a vertical axis—for explaining Pauline relations between God, Jesus, and the Spirit.”

 

Galatians 4:4-7[6]

Luther

 

Luther

 

Johannes Brenz (1499-1570)

 

Calvin

 

Georg Maior (1502-1574)

 

Wolfgang Musculus (1497-1563)

 

Kaspar Olevianus (1536-1587)

 

William Perkins (1558-1602)

 

Luther

 

Erasmus Sarcerius (1501-1559)

 

Brenz

 

Calvin

 

Luther

 

Luther

 

Sarcerius

 

Brenz

 

Calvin

 

Maior

 

Musculus

 

Olevianus

 

Gwalther

 

John Prime (unlisted, sent email 161219)

 

 

Robert Rollock (1555?-1599)

 

Perkins

 

Jean Diodati (1576-1649)

 

Luther

 

Brenz

 

Calvin

 

Diodati

 

 

Gal 4:4-6

Matthew W. Bates, review of Wesley Hill, Paul and the Trinity:  Persons, Relations and the Pauline Letters[7]

 

 

Gal 4:4-5

Janet Timbie, review of Charles Perrot, Marie de Nazareth au regard des chrétiens du premier siècle[8]

Timbie reports that Perrot

 

concludes that, just as the church refused a false “leveling” by retaining four very different Gospels in the canon of Scripture, so too it should resist falsely harmonizing the diverse views of Mary in order to produce a “Life of Mary” that resembles a historical novel (pp. 363-64).  Theological arguments should not be based on a false harmonization.

 

Gal 4:4-5

Max Botner, “The Role of Transcriptional Probability in the Next-Critical Debate on Mark 1:1”[9]

 

 

Gal 4:4-5

Matthew W. Bates, “A Christology of Incarnation and Enthronement:  Romans 1:3-4 as Unified, Nonadoptionist, and Nonconciliatory”[10]

 

 


 

Gal 4:4

Teresa Kuo-Yu Tsui, “Reconsidering Pauline Juxtaposition of Indicative and Imperative (Romans 6:1-14) in Light of Pauline Apocalypticism”[11]

 

 

Galatians 4:4[12]

= Catholic

Frans Titelmans (1502-1537)

 

Aegidius Hunnius (1550-1603)

 

Brenz

 

 

Galatians 4:4

“Encyclical Letter Lumen Fidei of the Supreme Pontiff Francis to the Bishops, Priests, and deacons [sic] and lay Faithful on Faith”[13]

 

 

Gal 4:6-7

Fr. Richard Tomasek, S.J., “In Processu:  Spiritual formation”[14]

 

 

Gal 4:6

Christiaan Jacobs-Vandegeer, “The Unity of Salvation:  Divine Missions, the Church, and World Religions”[15]

 

 

Gal 4:6

Michael Winger, “The Meaning of Pneuma in the Letters of Paul:  A Linguistic analysis of Sense and Reference”[16]

 

 

Gal 4:6

Richard I. Pervo, review of William P. Atkinson, Baptism in the Spirit:  Luke-Acts and the Dunn Debate[17]

 

 

Galatians 4:6

Selnecker[18]

 

 

Galatians 4:7

Dirk Philips (1504-1568)[19]

 

 

Hebrews 1:1-2

 

 

Luke 2:16-21

Luke 2:8-20[20]

Ulrich Zwingli, “The Clarity and Certainty of the Word of God, 1522”

 

 

Luke 2:16-21[21]

Hugh Latimer (c. 1485-1555)

 

Bucer

 

Brenz

 

Martin Luther

 

Bucer

 

Lucas Lossius (1508-1582)

 

Luke 2:21

Michael Peppard, “Paul Would Be Proud:  The New Testament and Jewish-Gentile Respect”[22]

 

 

For more on sources see the Appendix file.  A complete set of Personal Notes, dating from the Fifteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time, July 14, 2002 to the present, is on the web site at www.western-civilization.com/CBQ/Personal%20Notes. 

 

 

 

The Responsorial Antiphon for this Sunday is May God bless us in his mercy (Psalm 67:2a).[23]

 

In the gobbledygook prayer at Sunday Mass immediately following the forgiveness of sins, the Faithful hearing the 2011 Roman Missal can listen for “the fruitful virginity of Blessed Mary.”[24]  For a more thorough examination of the illiterate 2011 Roman Missal, go to 1610 Missal:  Thirty-fourth Sunday in Ordinary Time 121125.pdf/htm at http://www.western-civilization.com/CBQ/Personal%20Notes/Personal%20Notes.htm.

 

This is a call for grace that some Black Baptists bring to mind with By the word of the LORD were the heavens made; and all the host of them by the breath of his mouth (Psalm 33:6).[25] 

 

Addenda

 

I have already read every article cited in the Catholic Biblical Quarterly.  At this stage I only read unread book reviews there.  Traditionally Theological Studies articles have been more helpful to my prayer life, but, if I have already read the article, I will cite it without annotation.  I offer the Reformation Commentary on Scripture in a similar way.

 

 

I intend to begin catching up on material postponed while recovering from the transition of ourselves from Virginia to Ohio and Marty into the next life.  If I ever get three months out, again, I then intend to reevaluate the amount of energy placed into Personal Notes each week.    I would like to get to the Western Reserve Historical Society to set up the index to the research left there.

 

 



[1] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 77, No. 2 (April 2015) 348.

 

[2] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 78, No. 2 (April 2016) 294.

 

[3] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  Old Testament VII:  Psalms 1—72, Timothy George (ed.), general editor, Scot M. Manetsch, Associate General editor, Herman J. Selderhuis (ed.), (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2015, ISBN 978 0 8308-2957-6 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 15) 456-458.

 

[4] Theological Studies, Vol. 76, No. 3 (September 2015) 605.

 

[5] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 78, No. 3 (July 2016) 551.

 

[6] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament X: Galatians, Ephesians, (ed.) Gerald L. Bray (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic, An Imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2011: ISBN 978-0-8308-2973-6 (P 1 Y 11) 134-141.

 

[7] Theological Studies, Vol. 77, No. 1 (March 2016) 219.

 

[8] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 76, No. 4 (October 2014) 777.

 

[9] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 77, No. 3 (July 2015) 476.

 

[10] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 77, No. 1 (January 2015) 116, 117, 119-122.

 

[11] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 75, No. 2 (April 2013) 309.

 

[12] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament IV:  John 1—12, Craig S. Farmer (ed.), general editor, Timothy George, Associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch (ed.), (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2014, ISBN 978 0 8308-2967-5 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 14) 102, fn. 45; 179, fn. 26; 324, fn. 7.

 

[13] L’Osservatore Romano: Weekly Edition in English, Vol. 46, No. 28 (2013), Vatican City Wednesday, 10 July, paragraph 59, page 21-22/23.

 

[14] Homiletic & Pastoral Review, 90 # 10 (August/September 2010)  82.

 

[15] Theological Studies, Vol. 75, No. 2 (June 2014) 262.

 

[16] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 78, No. 4 (October ) 712, 713, 719,

722.

 

[17] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 77, No. 1 (January 2015) 165.

 

[18] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  Old Testament VII:  Psalms 1—72, Timothy George (ed.), general editor, Scot M. Manetsch, Associate General editor, Herman J. Selderhuis (ed.), (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2015, ISBN 978 0 8308-2957-6 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 15) 380, fn. 11.

 

[19] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament VI:  Acts, Esther Chung-Kim and Todd R. Hains (eds.), general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2014:  ISBN 978-0-8308-2969-9 (print) P 1 Y 14) 62, fn. 27.

 

[20] In Scott H. Hendrix, ed. and trans., Early Protestant Spirituality (New York, Mahwah: Paulist Press, 2009) 44.

 

[21] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament III:  Luke, Beth Kreitzer (ed.), general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2015:  ISBN 978-0-8308-2014 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 15) 54-58.

 

[22] Theological Studies, Vol. 76, No. 2 (June 2015) 275.

 

[23] National Conference of Catholic Bishops, The Roman Missal Restored by Decree of the Second Ecumenical Council of the Vatican and Promulgated by Authority of Pope Paul VI: Lectionary for Mass:  For Use in the Dioceses of the United States of America:  Second Typical Edition:  Volume I:  Sundays, Solemnities, Feasts of the Lord and the Saints (Collegeville, Minnesota:  The Liturgical Press, 1988) 108-109.  Personal Notes refers to this book as the Lectionary.

 

[24] n.a., The Roman Missal:  Renewed by Decree of the Most Holy Second Ecumenical Council of the Vatican, Promulgated by Authority of Pope Paul VI and Revised at the Direction of Pope John Paul II:  English Translation According to the Third Typical Edition:  For Use in the Dioceses of the United States of America:  Approved by the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops and Confirmed by the Apostolic See (Washington, DC, United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, 2011) 182.  Personal Notes refers to this book as the Missal.

 

[25] UMI Annual Sunday School Lesson Commentary:  Precepts for Living ®: 2013-2014:  International Sunday School Lessons:  Volume 165:  UMI (Urban Ministries, Inc.), a. Okechuku Ogbonnaya, Ph.D., (ed.) (Chicago, IL  60643: UMI (Urban Ministries, Inc.), 2013) .

 

 

UMI Annual Sunday School Lesson Commentary:  Precepts for Living ®: 2016-2017:  International Sunday School Lessons:  Volume 19:  UMI (Urban Ministries, Inc.), A. Okechuku Ogbonnaya, Ph.D., (ed.) (Chicago, IL  60643: UMI (Urban Ministries, Inc.), 2016) 194-195.