The second encyclical of Pope Francis, Laudato Si’, published My 24, 2016, preceded the December 2015 conference in Paris that inaugurated a new global agreement on limiting greenhouse gas emissions.  This encyclical marked a development in thinking about the environment.  Presenting the environment as created for humans to use changed to presenting the environment as something in which humans participated, with a moral obligation to preserve and not abuse.  Abuse consisted in mismanaging energy resources.  The LORD’s are the earth and its fullness; the world and those who dwell in it (Psalm 24:7c and 10b).

 

 

Readings

First Reading:                    Isaiah 7:10-14

Responsorial Psalm:          Psalm 24:1-2, 3-4, 5-6 (7c and 10b)

Second Reading:               Romans 1:1-7

Alleluia:                             Matthew 1:23

Gospel:                             Matthew 1:18-24

 

Annotated Bibliography

Musings above the solid line draw from material below.  Those disinterested in scholarly and tangential details should stop reading here.  If they do, however, they may miss some interesting prayer-provoking details.

 

 

Isaiah 7:10-14

Isaiah 7:12

Johannes Bugenhagen (1485-1558)[1]

 

Isaiah 7:14

Catharina Regina von Greiffenberg (1633-1694)[2]

 

 

Isaiah 7:14[3]

Wolfgang Musculus (1497-1563)

 

= Catholic

Johann Wild (1495-1554)

 

 

Isaiah 7:9

Walter Brueggemann and Davis Hankins, “The Affirmation of Prophetic Power and Deconstruction of Royal Authority in the Elisha Narratives”[4]

 

 

Isaiah 7:14

H.G.M. Williamson, review of Christophe Rico, La mère de l’Enfant-Roi, Isaïe 7, 14” “Almâ” et “Parthenos” dans l’univers biblique.  Un point de vue[5]

 

Isaiah 7:14

Gerald O’Collins, S.J., review of André LaCocque, Jesus the Central Jew:  His Times and His People[6]

O’Collins concludes,

 

Sadly L. quickly dismisses as “mythologized” ideology the Jesus of early Christian creeds.  But he is surely right in regretting the way in which Christians too often came to define their identity apart from and even in opposition to their Jewish parentage (274).

 

 

Psalm 24:1-2, 3-4, 5-6 (7c and 10b)

Psalm 24:1-10[7]

Philipp Melanchthon (1497-1560)

 

The English Annotations (1645, 1651, 1657)

 

John Calvin (1509-1564)

 

Cardinal Cajetan (1469-1534)

 

Nikolaus Selnecker (1530-1592)

 

Konrad Pellikan (1478-1556)

 

Calvin

 

Peter Riedemann (1506-1556)

 

Selnecker

 

Sebastian Münster (1489-1552)

 

Selnecker

 

Calvin

 

 

Psalm 24:1-2

Nicholas R. Werse, “Second Temple Jewish Literary Traditions in 2 Peter”[8]

 

 


 

Psalm 24:1

Johannes Brenz (1499-1570)[9]

 

 

Psalm 24:1

Moïse Amyraut (1596-1664)[10]

 

Psalm 24:1

Michael S. Northcott, “Planetary Moral Economy and Creaturely Redemption in Laudato Si’”[11]

Pope Francis has advanced theology by changing the catechetical dictum that all creation is meant for humans to all creation is meant to glorify God, i.e. non-human creation merits conservation.  The most disturbing part of this article involves air-conditioning. 

 

For Francis there is a need for individuals and businesses to respond to divine grace, and to the signs of the times, and voluntarily to change their lifestyles, reduce their environmental footprint, and demonstrate “a new ecological sensitivity” while cultivating sound virtues and using heating or air conditioning less, buying less stuff, and using plastic, paper, water, electricity, and cars much less:  “there is a nobility in the duty to care for creation through little daily actions’ and it is wrong `to think that these efforts are not going to change the world” (LS 211).

 

 


 

Psalm 24:3-6

Riedemann[12]

 

 

Psalm 24:4

Frank J. Matera, The Sermon on the Mount:  The Perfect Measure of the Christian Life[13]

 

 

Psalm 24:7

Martin Bucer (1491-1551)[14]

 

 

Psalm 24:9

Tilemann Hesshus (1527-1588)[15]

“duties of a ruler . . . deliver the oppressed,” like those victimized by sexual abuse “ . . . and defend integrity” as found in the victims.  Hesshus goes on, “ . . . comfort terrified minds with the gospel.”

 

 

Romans 1:1-7

Rom 1:1-17

Warren Carter, review of Jan E. Rock, Paul’s Letter to the Romans and Roman Imperialism:  An Ideological Analysis of the Exordium (Romans 1:1-17)[16]

 

 

Romans 1:1

Luther[17]

 

 . . . the one who gives good things, even to one’s enemies and those who render that one evil in return, what is the benefit in comparison with the gospel?  Yet the one who gives good things only to friends is less than this person, who is really very rare; and lesser still is the person who lends goods; and below that one is the one who shares nothing; and worst of all is the one who even takes away these gifts either by thought (which nearly the whole human race is doing) or by deed, which a great many are doing.  Therefore, when he boasts about his office, the apostle is merelyh commending the gospel.

 

Romans 1:2

Calvin[18]

 

 

Rom 1:3

Stephen C. Carlson, “The Davidic Key for Counting the Generations in Matthew 1:17”[19]

 

 

Romans 1:3-4

Richard Taverner (1505-1575)[20]

 

 

Rom 1:3-4

Richard J. Dillon, “Mark 1:1-15:  `New Evangelization’?”[21]

 

 

Rom 1:3-4

Timothy Milinovich, review of Petr Pokorný, From the Gospel to the Gospels:  History, Theology and Impact of the Biblical Term `Euangelion’[22]

 

 

Romans 1:5

“Encyclical Letter Lumen Fidei of the Supreme Pontiff Francis to the Bishops, Priests, and deacons [sic] and lay Faithful on Faith”[23]

 

 

Romans 1:7

David Pareus (1548-1622)[24]

In a footnote, the editor explains, “In Robert Estienne’s Textus Receptus (1550), Paul uses theos Kai pater (“God and Father”) sixteen times including . . . He uses theos pater (God the Father [sic] ) eighteen times:  Rom 1:7 [here] . . . Modern critical editions of the Greek New Testament differ slightly.  The Nestle-Aland, Novum Testamentum: Graece et Latine: Textum Graecum post Eberhard et Erwin Nestle communiter ediderunt Barbara et Kurt Aland, Johannes Karavidopoulos, Carlo M. Martini, Bruce M. Metzger: Textus Latinus Novae Vulgatae Bibliorum Sacrorum Editioni debetur: Utriusque textus apparatum criticum recensuerent et editionem novis curis elaboraverunt Barbara et Kurt Aland una cum Instituto Studiorum Textus Novi Testamenti Monasterii Westphaliae (Deutsche Bibelgesellschaft 1999) Editio XXVII, 409, agrees.

 

 

Romans 1:7

Bugenhagen[25]

 

 

Rom 1:1-15

David R. Bauer, review of Georg Rubel, Paulus und Rom:  Historische, rezeptionsgeschichtliche und archäologische Aspekte zum letzten  Lebensabschnitt des Völkerapostels[26]

 

 

Rom 1:1-4

Max Botner, “The Role of Transcriptional Probability in the Next-Critical Debate on Mark 1:1”[27]

 

 

Rom 1:3-4

Matthew W. Bates, “A Christology of Incarnation and Enthronement:  Romans 1:3-4 as Unified, Nonadoptionist, and Nonconciliatory” [28]

 

 

Rom 1:3

Wendell Willis, review of V. George Shillington, James and Paul:  The Politics of Identity at the Turn of the Ages[29]

 

 

Romans 1:3

Gerald O’Collins, S.J., review of André LaCocque, Jesus the Central Jew:  His Times and His People[30]

See above.

 

Rom 1:4

Michael Winger, “The Meaning of Pneuma in the Letters of Paul:  A Linguistic analysis of Sense and Reference”[31]

 

 

Rom 1:5-6

Benjamin White, review of Rafael Rodríguez, If you call Yourself a Jew:  Reappraising Paul’s Letter to the Romans[32]

 

 

Rom 1:5

Georges Massinelli, O.F.M., “Christ and the Law in Romans 10:4”[33]

 

 

Rom 1:1-7

James Swetnam, S.J., review of Romano Penna, Carta a los Romanos:  Introducción, version y comentario[34]

 

 

Matthew 1:23

 

 

Matthew 1:18-24

Matthew 1:18-24

Frank J. Matera, The Sermon on the Mount:  The Perfect Measure of the Christian Life[35]

 

 

Matthew 1:20

Daniel B. Wallace, With Scripture, Subject, and Greek Word Indexes: Greek Grammar:  Beyond the Basics: An Exegetical Syntax of the New Testament[36]

 

 

For more on sources see the Appendix file.  A complete set of Personal Notes, dating from the Fifteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time, July 14, 2002 to the present, is on the web site at www.western-civilization.com/CBQ/Personal%20Notes. 

 

 

 

The Responsorial Antiphon for this Sunday is Let the Lord enter; he is king of glory (Psalm 24:7c and 10b).[37]

 

In the gobbledygook prayer at Sunday Mass immediately following the forgiveness of sins, the Faithful hearing the 2011 Roman Missal can listen for “the Incarnation of Christ your son was made known by the message of an Angel [sic].”[38]  For a more thorough examination of the illiterate 2011 Roman Missal, go to 1610 Missal:  Thirty-fourth Sunday in Ordinary Time 121125.pdf/htm at http://www.western-civilization.com/CBQ/Personal%20Notes/Personal%20Notes.htm.

 

This is a call for grace that some Black Baptists bring to mind with Thy wife Elisabeth shall bear thee a son, and thou shalt call his name John.  And thou shalt have joy and gladness; and many shall rejoice at his birth (from Luke 1:13-14).[39] 

 

Addenda

 

 

 

I have already read every article cited in the Catholic Biblical Quarterly.  At this stage I only read unread book reviews there.  Traditionally Theological Studies articles have been more helpful to my prayer life, but, if I have already read the article, I will cite it without annotation.  I offer the Reformation Commentary on Scripture in a similar way.

 

 

I intend to begin catching up on material postponed while recovering from the transition of ourselves from Virginia to Ohio and Marty into the next life.  If I ever get three months out, again, I then intend to reevaluate the amount of energy placed into Personal Notes each week.    I would like to get to the Western Reserve Historical Society to set up the index to the research left there.

 

 



[1] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  Old Testament V:  1-2 Samuel, 1-2 Kings, 1-2 Chronicles, Timothy George (ed.), general editor, Scot M. Manetsch, Associate General editor, Derek Cooper and Martin J. Lohrmann (ed.), (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2016, ISBN 978 0 8308-2955-2 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 16) 470, fn. 25.

 

[2] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament III:  Luke, Beth Kreitzer (ed.), general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2015:  ISBN 978-0-8308-2014 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 15) 17, fn. 10.

 

[3] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament IV:  John 1—12, Craig S. Farmer (ed.), general editor, Timothy George, Associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch (ed.), (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2014, ISBN 978 0 8308-2967-5 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 14) 32, fn. 61; 190, fn 19.

 

[4] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 76, No. 1 (January 2014) 58.

 

[5] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 76, No. 2 (April 2014) 338.

 

[6] Theological Studies, Vol. 77, No. 4 (December 2016) 949, 950.

 

[7] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  Old Testament VII:  Psalms 1—72, Timothy George (ed.), general editor, Scot M. Manetsch, Associate General editor, Herman J. Selderhuis (ed.), (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2015, ISBN 978 0 8308-2957-6 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 15) 197-200.

 

[8] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 78, No. 1 (January 2016), 123.

 

[9] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament III:  Luke, Beth Kreitzer (ed.), general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2015:  ISBN 978-0-8308-2014 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 15) 80, fn. 15.

 

[10] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  Old Testament VII:  Psalms 1—72, Timothy George (ed.), general editor, Scot M. Manetsch, Associate General editor, Herman J. Selderhuis (ed.), (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2015, ISBN 978 0 8308-2957-6 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 15) 295, fn. 13.

 

[11] Theological Studies, Vol. 77, No. 4 (December 2016) 897.

 

[12] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  Old Testament VII:  Psalms 1—72, Timothy George (ed.), general editor, Scot M. Manetsch, Associate General editor, Herman J. Selderhuis (ed.), (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2015, ISBN 978 0 8308-2957-6 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 15) 199, fn. 10.

 

[13] Collegeville, Minnesota:  Liturgical Press, 2013, 40.

 

[14] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  Old Testament VII:  Psalms 1—72, Timothy George (ed.), general editor, Scot M. Manetsch, Associate General editor, Herman J. Selderhuis (ed.), (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2015, ISBN 978 0 8308-2957-6 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 15) 193, fn. 17.

 

[15] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament VIII:  Romans 9—16, Timothy George (ed.), general editor; Scot M. Manetsch, Associate General editor; Philip D. W. Krey and Peter D. S. Krey (ed.), (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2016, ISBN 978 0 8308-2971-2, P 1, Y 16) 157, fn. 21; 161..

 

[16] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 76, No. 4 (October 2014) 781-782.

 

[17] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament VIII:  Romans 9—16, Timothy George (ed.), general editor; Scot M. Manetsch, Associate General editor; Philip D. W. Krey and Peter D. S. Krey (ed.), (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2016, ISBN 978 0 8308-2971-2, P 1, Y 16) 231-232, fn. 17.

 

[18] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament III:  Luke, Beth Kreitzer (ed.), general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2015:  ISBN 978-0-8308-2014 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 15) 2, fn. 1.

 

[19] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 76, No. 4 (October 2014) 666, 681.

 

[20] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament III:  Luke, Beth Kreitzer (ed.), general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2015:  ISBN 978-0-8308-2014 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 15) 91, fn. 11.

 

[21] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 76, No. 1 (January 2014), 2.

 

[22] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 76, No. 4 (October 2014) 779.

 

[23] L’Osservatore Romano: Weekly Edition in English, Vol. 46, No. 28 (2013), Vatican City Wednesday, 10 July, paragraph 29, page 16/23.

 

[24] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament VIII:  Romans 9—16, Timothy George (ed.), general editor; Scot M. Manetsch, Associate General editor; Philip D. W. Krey and Peter D. S. Krey (ed.), (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2016, ISBN 978 0 8308-2971-2, P 1, Y 16) 216

 

[25] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  Old Testament V:  1-2 Samuel, 1-2 Kings, 1-2 Chronicles, Timothy George (ed.), general editor, Scot M. Manetsch, Associate General editor, Derek Cooper and Martin J. Lohrmann (ed.), (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2016, ISBN 978 0 8308-2955-2 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 16) 321, fn. 9.

 

[26] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 78, No. 1 (January 2016) 173.

 

[27] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 77, No. 3 (July 2015) 476.

 

[28] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 77, No. 1 (January  2015) 207-217.

 

[29] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 78, No. 4 (October ) 791.

 

[30] Theological Studies, Vol. 77, No. 4 (December 2016) 949.

 

[31] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 78, No. 4 ( October ) 714, 716.

 

[32] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 78, No. 4 (October ) 789.

 

[33] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 77, No. 4 (October 2015), 722.

 

[34] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 77, No. 3 (July 2015) 565.

 

[35] Collegeville, Minnesota:  Liturgical Press, 2013, 48.

 

[36] Grand Rapids: Michigan: Zondervan, 1996, 252, 469, 723.

 

[37] National Conference of Catholic Bishops, The Roman Missal Restored by Decree of the Second Ecumenical Council of the Vatican and Promulgated by Authority of Pope Paul VI: Lectionary for Mass:  For Use in the Dioceses of the United States of America:  Second Typical Edition:  Volume I:  Sundays, Solemnities, Feasts of the Lord and the Saints (Collegeville, Minnesota:  The Liturgical Press, 1988) 51.  Personal Notes refers to this book as the Lectionary.

 

[38] n.a., The Roman Missal:  Renewed by Decree of the Most Holy Second Ecumenical Council of the Vatican, Promulgated by Authority of Pope Paul VI and Revised at the Direction of Pope John Paul II:  English Translation According to the Third Typical Edition:  For Use in the Dioceses of the United States of America:  Approved by the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops and Confirmed by the Apostolic See (Washington, DC, United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, 2011) 159.  Personal Notes refers to this book as the Missal.

 

[39] UMI Annual Sunday School Lesson Commentary:  Precepts for Living ®: 2016-2017:  International Sunday School Lessons:  Volume 19:  UMI (Urban Ministries, Inc.), A. Okechuku Ogbonnaya, Ph.D., (ed.) (Chicago, IL  60643: UMI (Urban Ministries, Inc.), 2016) 174-175.