This is the first Sunday in the Roman Catholic Church Year of Mercy.  Most importantly, this is the time to open the doors to dialogue with Muslims.  My fear is that Donald Trump versus the Muslims is an incipient Hitler versus the Jews.  The Faithful ought not to overlook the tempering affect Black Muslims have on Islamic Jihad that ought.  Black Muslims have friends and relatives, good people, who are not Muslim, and are exempt from all notions of Jihad.

 

Mercy ought not to distract the Faithful from seeking justice, especially for minorities of all stripes:  for example, Blacks, Latinos, women, and sexual deviants.  Clerical administrators have mistaken care for the institutional Church with care for the Faithful, for whom the Church exists.  As a human experience, humans can choose to be happy and join, “Cry out with joy and gladness:  for among you is the great and Holy One of Israel” (Isaiah 12:6).

 

 

 

Readings

First Reading:                   Zephaniah 3:14-18 a

Responsorial Psalm:          Isaiah 12:2-3, 4, 5-6 (6)

Second Reading:              Philippians 4:4-7

Alleluia:                             Isaiah 61:1 (cited in Luke 4:18)

Gospel:                             Luke 3:10-18

 

Annotated Bibliography

Musings above the solid line draw from material below.  Those uninterested in scholarly and tangential details should stop reading here.  If they do, however, they may miss some interesting details.

 

Zephaniah 3:14-18 a

 

 

Isaiah 12:2-3, 4, 5-6 (6)

 

 

Philippians 4:4-7

Philippians 4:4-6

Geneva Bible (1560),[1] “On Philippians 4:6”

 

 

Philippians 4:4[2]

Lancelot Ridley (d. 1576), “Exposition on Philippians 4:4”

 

 

Henry Airay (c. 1560-1616), “Lectures on Philippians 4:4”

 

 

Philippians 4:4

Pope Francis, The Joy of the Gospel[3]

 

 

Philippians 4:5[4]

John Calvin, “Commentary on Philippians 4:5”

 

 

Johannes Bugenhagen (1485-1558), Commentary on Philippians 4:5”

 

 

Martin Luther (1483-1546), “Church Postil (1522), Fourth Sunday in Advent”

 

 

Henry Airay, “Lectures on Philippians 4:5”

 

 

Lancelot Ridley, “Exposition on Philippians 4:5”

 

 

Phil 4:5

John Gillman, review of Jeremy Gabrielson, Paul’s Non-Violent [sic] Gospel:  The Theological Politics of Pease in Paul’s Life and Letters[5]

 

 

Philippians 4:6

John Calvin (1509-1564),[6] “Commentary on Philippians 4:6”

 

 

Philippians 4:6[7]

Johann Baumgart (Pomarius) (1514-1578), “Postilla”

The Faithful should learn from this episode always to bless and thank God.

 

 

Mathew Caylie (unknown), “The Cleansing of the Ten Lepers”

Learn to give thanks for favors and benefits received from God.

 

 

Philippians 4:7

Susan K. Roll, “Theology of the Latin Text and Rite”[8]

 

 

Philippians 4:7

Valentin Weigel (1533-1588),[9] “Gospel for the First Sunday in Advent”

“Christ cannot make me holy if he remains outside me” even Eucharistically.

 

 

Philippians 4:7

St. Thérèse of Lisieux, The Story of a Soul:  A New Translation[10]

 

 

Phil 4:7

Eugene Hensell, O.S.B., review of Peter R. Rodgers, Text and Story:  Narrative Studies in New Testament Textual Criticism[11]

 

 

Isaiah 61:1 (cited in Luke 4:18)

 

 

Luke 3:10-18

Luke 3:1-22

John T. Carroll, review of Jaroslav Rindoš, He of Whom It Is Written:  John the Baptist and Elijah in Luke[12]

 

 

Luke 3:10-14

Harry T. Fleddermann, review of Ronald Jolliffe, with Gertraud Harb, Christoph Heil, Anneliese Felber, and Angelika Magnes, Q 11:46b, 52, 47-51, Woes against the Exegetes of the Law:  Wisdom’s Judgment on This Generation[13]

Q is the quotation source assumed to lie behind the synoptic Gospels.  To decide whether something belongs in Q, the styles of the Evangelists need examination according to vocabulary, style, and theology.  Luke 3:10-14 illustrates the Lukan style of breaking up long speeches by introducing other dialogue partners.  This 693 page book is very academic, valuable, and expensive (100 pounds).

 

Luke 3:11

Richard I Pervo, review of Beth M. Sheppard, The Craft of History and the Study of the New Testament[14]

Shepherd lacks the scholarly acumen required for writing this text.  For example, that Luke writes about those who own two cloaks does not mean, as Sheppard asserts, that the audience of John the Baptist was at or near the subsistence level and that Luke came from a community of modest means.

 

Luke 3:14

Laurie Brink, O.P., review of Alexander Kyrychenko, The Roman Army and the Expansion of the Gospel:  The Role of the centurion in Luke-Acts[15]

Kyrychenko assumes the soldiers were Roman, when they also may have been Herodian or Jewish.

 

Luke 3:14[16]

The English Annotations (1645, 1651; 1657), “Annotations upon the Gospel According to Saint Luke 3:14”

 

 

Hans Denck (c. 1500-1527), “Concerning True Love (1527)”

“. . . a friend of God therefore should and must not advance into but rather out of government” and so the Faithful suffer.

 

 

Luke 3:15-17

Jeff Cavins, Tim Gray, and Sarah Christmyer, The Bible Timeline:  The Story of Salvation[17]

 

 

Luke 3:15

The English Annotations, [18]  “Annotations upon the Gospel according to Saint Luke 7:21”

John the Baptist, who was greater than any prophet was, performed no recorded miracle, but Jesus and his disciples did.

 

 

 

Luke 3:16

Daniel B. Wallace, With Scripture, Subject, and Greek Word Indexes: Greek Grammar:  Beyond the Basics: An Exegetical Syntax of the New Testament[19]

 

 

Personal Notes gave up systematically examining the illiterate 2011 Missal November 25, 2012.  On April 7, 2013, with Reading 045C 2nd Sunday of Easter_A Catholic Bible Study 130407, Personal Notes systematically began to incorporate material from A Commentary on the Order of Mass of The Roman Missal:  A New English Translation:  Developed under the Auspices of the Catholic Academy of Liturgy, Edward Foley (ed.) (Collegeville, Minnesota:  Liturgical Press, 2011).  The hope is that this approach will help pray with the new Missal, despite itself.

As, on June 23, 2015, I prepared Reading 110B for the Seventeenth Sunday in Ordinary time for July 26, I decided to begin reading unread book reviews and articles from Theological Studies for two reasons.  The first is I have already read every article cited in the Catholic Biblical Quarterly.  The second is that traditionally Theological Studies articles have been more helpful to my prayer life.  I also began reading unread book reviews in the Biblical Quarterly.

 

 

For more on sources see the Appendix file.  A complete set of Personal Notes, dating from the Fifteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time, July 14, 2002 to the present, is on the web site at www.western-civilization.com/CBQ/Personal%20Notes. 

 

 

The Responsorial Antiphon for this Sunday is Cry out with joy and gladness:  for among you is the great and Holy One of Israel (Isaiah 12:6).[20]

 

In the gobbledygook prayer at Sunday Mass immediately following mention of forgiven sins, the Faithful hearing the 2011 Roman Missal can listen for “faithfully await the feast.”[21]

 

This is a call for grace that some Black Baptists call to mind with I beseech you therefore, brethren, by the mercies of God, that ye present your bodies a living sacrifice, holy, acceptable unto God, which is your reasonable service (Romans 12:1).[22] 

 



[1] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament XI:  Philippians, Colossians, Graham Tomlin (ed.) in collaboration with Gregory B. Graybill, general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2013: ISBN 978-0-8308-2974-3 (P 1 Y 13) 104.

 

[2] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament XI:  Philippians, Colossians, Graham Tomlin (ed.) in collaboration with Gregory B. Graybill, general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2013: ISBN 978-0-8308-2974-3 (P 1 Y 13) 105.

 

[3] Erlanger, Kentucky:  Libreria Editrice Vaticana, DynamicCatholic.com, 2014, 21.

 

[4] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament XI:  Philippians, Colossians, Graham Tomlin (ed.) in collaboration with Gregory B. Graybill, general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2013: ISBN 978-0-8308-2974-3 (P 1 Y 13) 106, 107, 108.

 

[5] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 77 No. 2 (April 2015) 371.

 

[6] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament XI:  Philippians, Colossians, Graham Tomlin (ed.) in collaboration with Gregory B. Graybill, general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2013: ISBN 978-0-8308-2974-3 (P 1 Y 13) 110.

 

[7] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament III:  Luke, Beth Kreitzer (ed.), general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2015:  ISBN 978-0-8308-2014 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 15) 121, 339.

 

[8] in A Commentary on the Order of Mass of The Roman Missal:  A New English Translation:  Developed under the Auspices of the Catholic Academy of Liturgy, Edward Foley (ed.) (Collegeville, Minnesota:  Liturgical Press, 2011) 637.

 

[9] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament III:  Luke, Beth Kreitzer (ed.), general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2015:  ISBN 978-0-8308-2014 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 15) 501.

 

[10] Robert J. Edmonson, CJ, (translator) (Brewster, Massachusetts: Paraclete Press, 2006) 187.

 

[11] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 75 No. 4 (September 2013) 819, 820.

 

[12] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 75 No. 1 (January 2013) 171.

 

[13] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 76 No. 2 (April 2014) 357.

 

[14] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 77 No. 1 (January 2015) 186.

 

[15] Theological Studies, Vol. 76, No. 4 (December 2015) 838.

 

[16] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament III:  Luke, Beth Kreitzer (ed.), general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2015:  ISBN 978-0-8308-2014 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 15) 81, 82.

 

[17] West Chester, Pennsylvania:  Ascension Press, 2004, 2011, Session 18, page 2 and 126.

 

[18] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament III:  Luke, Beth Kreitzer (ed.), general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2015:  ISBN 978-0-8308-2014 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 15) 158.

 

[19] Grand Rapids: Michigan: Zondervan, 1996, 155, 421, 521, 536.

 

[20] National Conference of Catholic Bishops, The Roman Missal Restored by Decree of the Second Ecumenical Council of the Vatican and Promulgated by Authority of Pope Paul VI: Lectionary for Mass:  For Use in the Dioceses of the United States of America:  Second Typical Edition:  Volume I:  Sundays, Solemnities, Feasts of the Lord and the Saints (Collegeville, Minnesota:  The Liturgical Press, 1988) 45.  Personal Notes refers to this book as the Lectionary.

 

[21] n.a., The Roman Missal:  Renewed by Decree of the Most Holy Second Ecumenical Council of the Vatican, Promulgated by Authority of Pope Paul VI and Revised at the Direction of Pope John Paul II:  English Translation According to the Third Typical Edition:  For Use in the Dioceses of the United States of America:  Approved by the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops and Confirmed by the Apostolic See (Washington, DC, United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, 2011) 153.  Personal Notes refers to this book as the Missal.

 

[22] UMI Annual Sunday School Lesson Commentary:  Precepts for Living ®: 2015-2016:  International Sunday School Lessons:  Volume 18:  UMI (Urban Ministries, Inc.), (Chicago, IL  60643: UMI (Urban Ministries, Inc.), 2015) 171-172.