Liturgically, Advent, the pre-Christmas Season is more about pay-pray-and-obey than about accepting responsibility for improving the way things are.  In a week, I intend to help the Western Reserve Historical Society honor the centennial of the Call and Post, the Cleveland Black newspaper.  My prayer is to reestablish connections with the Black communities, after physical absence of fifty years.  My further prayer is to participate in improving the way things are by improving recognition of the news as delivered by the Call and Post. 

 

Don King, the boxing promoter, now publishes the Call and Post.  Don King exemplifies what it is like to accept responsibility for being American, rather than just being in America.  Were a journalist to take me under their wing, I might be able to contribute that notion to the Call and Post as my effort to improve the way things are.  With the Liturgy of the Word, Lord, come and save us (cf. Isaiah 35:4)[1] from ourselves.

 

 

Readings

First Reading:                    Isaiah 35:1-6a, 10

Responsorial Psalm:          Psalm 146:6-7, 8-9, 9-10 (cf. Isaiah 35:4)

Second Reading:               James 5:7-10

Alleluia:                             Isaiah 61:1 (cited in Luke 4:18)

Gospel:                             Matthew 11:2-11

 

Annotated Bibliography

Musings above the solid line draw from material below.  Those disinterested in scholarly and tangential details should stop reading here.  If they do, however, they may miss some interesting prayer-provoking details.

 

 

Isaiah 35:1-6a, 10

Isaiah 35:1-10 is included in Readings from Sacred Scripture in Pastoral Care of the Sick.[2]  Verse 10 to the LORD ransoming the Faithful so they can enter Zion singing, has a special meaning once Zion is understood as the souls of the Faithful.  The meaning of verse 10 is the cleaning of the unconscious, thereby permitting full rejoicing on the part of those repenting material sins, rooted in the unconscious mind.

 

Psalm 146:6-7, 8-9, 9-10 (cf. Isaiah 35:4)

This Psalm is used in the Funeral Rites , one of the Second Psalms for Morning Prayer.[3] 

 

James 5:7-10

James 5:7-20

Michael Gilmour, review of John Painter and David A. DeSilva, James and Jude[4]

 

 

James 5:7-11

Patrick J. Hartin, review of David B. Gowler, James through the Centuries[5]

Hartin reports,

 

 . . . though James contains more echoes of Jesus’ teaching and the Sermon on the Mount  than any other text outside the Gospels, the epistle struggled to gain acceptance as Sacred Scripture.  G. offers a possible reason in that many of these echoes of Jesus’ teaching relate d issues of social justice that do not resonate well with the way some Christians have “domesticated” Jesus and his teaching (p. 2).

 

James 5:10

Daniel B. Wallace, With Scripture, Subject, and Greek Word Indexes: Greek Grammar:  Beyond the Basics: An Exegetical Syntax of the New Testament[6]

 

Isaiah 61:1 (cited in Luke 4:18)

 

 

Matthew 11:2-11

Matt 11:4-5

Richard W. Miller, “Deep Responsibility for the Deep Future”[7]

Miller writes,

 

 . . . 49% of Americans (43% of Catholics) think the severity of recent natural disasters are signs of the end times as described by the Bible and not evidence of climate change.  Such an interpretation of the apocalyptic texts in the New Testament tends to distance human beings from their responsibility for the unfolding climate crisis.

 

Matthew 11:4 and 5[8]

Martin Luther (1483-1546)

 

Luther

 

 

 

Matthew 11:9[9]

Martin Bucer (1491-1551)

 

John Calvin (1509-1564)

 

 

Matthew 11:9

Frank J. Matera, The Sermon on the Mount:  The Perfect Measure of the Christian Life[10]

 

 

Matthew 11:11

Peter Hausted (d. 1645)[11]

 

 

For more on sources see the Appendix file.  A complete set of Personal Notes, dating from the Fifteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time, July 14, 2002 to the present, is on the web site at www.western-civilization.com/CBQ/Personal%20Notes. 

 

 

 

The Responsorial Antiphon for this Sunday is Lord, come and save us (cf. Isaiah 35:4).[12]

 

In the gobbledygook prayer at Sunday Mass immediately following the forgiveness of sins, the Faithful hearing the 2011 Roman Missal can listen for “faithfully await the feast of the Lord’s Nativity.”[13]  For a more thorough examination of the illiterate 2011 Roman Missal, go to 1610 Missal:  Thirty-fourth Sunday in Ordinary Time 121125.pdf/htm at http://www.western-civilization.com/CBQ/Personal%20Notes/Personal%20Notes.htm.

 

This is a call for grace that some Black Baptists bring to mind with And Mary said, My soul doth magnify the Lord, And my spirit hath rejoiced in God my Saviour (Luke 1:46.47).[14] 

 

Addenda

 

Personal Notes has been wary of Raymond Arroyo, host of “the World Over, on the Eternal Word Television Network, EWTN, attacking Pope Francis.  Personal Notes has watched for various Papal policies, like anything possibly construed as positive for Democrats, that Arroyo might systematically attack.  Nothing seemed to fall into place until a better realization of what the “Papal Posse,” with Robert Royal, a journalist, and Father Gerald Murray, a canon lawyer, means.  The Posse is out to find and attack Pope Francis, and this on a Catholic network.  This fell into place at the program Thursday, June 25, 2016.  EWTN represents the stand of the United States Catholic Conference of Bishops (USCCB).  LeBron James, for one, is objecting to basketball New York Knicks basketball President Phil Jackson for using the word “posse” to describe business partners of LeBron James.[15]

 

I have already read every article cited in the Catholic Biblical Quarterly.  At this stage I only read unread book reviews there.  Traditionally Theological Studies articles have been more helpful to my prayer life, but, if I have already read the article, I will cite it without annotation.  I offer the Reformation Commentary on Scripture in a similar way.

 

 

I intend to begin catching up on material postponed while recovering from the transition of ourselves from Virginia to Ohio and Marty into the next life.  If I ever get three months out, again, I then intend to reevaluate the amount of energy placed into Personal Notes each week.    I would like to get to the Western Reserve Historical Society to et up the index to the research left there.

 

 



[1] National Conference of Catholic Bishops, The Roman Missal Restored by Decree of the Second Ecumenical Council of the Vatican and Promulgated by Authority of Pope Paul VI: Lectionary for Mass:  For Use in the Dioceses of the United States of America:  Second Typical Edition:  Volume I:  Sundays, Solemnities, Feasts of the Lord and the Saints (Collegeville, Minnesota:  The Liturgical Press, 1988) 34.  Personal Notes refers to this book as the Lectionary.

 

 

[2] Old Testament Readings, G, Part III: Readings, Responses, and Verses from Sacred Scripture, The Roman Ritual: Revised by Decree of the Second Vatican Ecumenical Council and Published by Authority of Pope Paul VI: Pastoral Care of the Sick: Rites of Anointing and Viaticum: Approved for use in the dioceses of the United States of America by the National Conference of Catholic Bishops and Confirmed by the Apostolic See: Prepared by International Commission on English in the Liturgy: a Joint Commission of Catholic Bishops’ Conferences (New York: Catholic Book Publishing Co. 1983) 257-259.

[3] N.a., International Commission on English in the Liturgy: A Joint Commission of Catholic Bishops’ Conferences, The Roman Ritual: Revised by Decree of the Second Vatican Ecumenical Council and published by Authority of Pope Paul IV: Order of Christian Funerals: Including Appendix 2: Cremation: Approved for use in the Dioceses of the United States of America by the National Conference of Catholic Bishops and Confirmed by the Apostolic See (New Jersey: Catholic Book Publishing Co., 1998), 307.

 

[4] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 76, No. 2 (April 2014), 372.

 

[5] the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Vol. 78, No. 2 (April 2016), 366.

 

[6] Grand Rapids: Michigan: Zondervan, 1996, 187, 243.

 

[7] Theological Studies, Vol. 77, No. 2 (June 2016) 448.

 

[8] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  Old Testament VII:  Psalms 1—72, Timothy George (ed.), general editor, Scot M. Manetsch, Associate General editor, Herman J. Selderhuis (ed.), (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2015, ISBN 978 0 8308-2957-6 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 15) 205, fn. 11; 320, fn. 5.

 

[9] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament IV:  John 1—12, Craig S. Farmer (ed.), general editor, Timothy George, Associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch (ed.), (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2014, ISBN 978 0 8308-2967-5 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 14) 42, fn. 4; 43, fn. 6.

 

[10] Collegeville, Minnesota:  Liturgical Press, 2013, 110.

 

[11] in Reformation Commentary on Scripture:  New Testament III:  Luke, Beth Kreitzer (ed.), general editor, Timothy George, associate General editor, Scott M. Manetsch, (Downers Grove, Illinois:  IVP Academic:  An imprint of InterVarsity Press, 2015:  ISBN 978-0-8308-2014 (hardcover : alk. paper), P 1, Y 15) 37

 

[12] National Conference of Catholic Bishops, The Roman Missal Restored by Decree of the Second Ecumenical Council of the Vatican and Promulgated by Authority of Pope Paul VI: Lectionary for Mass:  For Use in the Dioceses of the United States of America:  Second Typical Edition:  Volume I:  Sundays, Solemnities, Feasts of the Lord and the Saints (Collegeville, Minnesota:  The Liturgical Press, 1988) 34.  Personal Notes refers to this book as the Lectionary.

 

[13] n.a., The Roman Missal:  Renewed by Decree of the Most Holy Second Ecumenical Council of the Vatican, Promulgated by Authority of Pope Paul VI and Revised at the Direction of Pope John Paul II:  English Translation According to the Third Typical Edition:  For Use in the Dioceses of the United States of America:  Approved by the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops and Confirmed by the Apostolic See (Washington, DC, United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, 2011) 152.  Personal Notes refers to this book as the Missal.

 

[14] UMI Annual Sunday School Lesson Commentary:  Precepts for Living ®: 2016-2017:  International Sunday School Lessons:  Volume 19:  UMI (Urban Ministries, Inc.), A. Okechuku Ogbonnaya, Ph.D., (ed.) (Chicago, IL  60643: UMI (Urban Ministries, Inc.), 2016) 462-163.