Missal[1]

Trying pray with the 2011 illiterate Missal[2] is difficult for at least two reasons.  The first is the amount of time and space it takes.  Second is the purpose of this part of Personal Notes is to pray with the Missal.  That means these Personal Notes are not free to ignore the Bible-babble found there. 

Clarity is not a prerequisite for prayer.  The search for clarity can be a means to prayer, faith seeking understanding, as Saint Anslem of Canterbury (1033-1109) puts it.[3]  In an attempt to use the prayers the anti-Vatican-II, Vatican, is now setting forth these Notes are taking on a new focus. 

 

Collect (Prayer)

 

Collect from the Missal:  The 2011 illiterate Missal offers the following Collect (prayer).  “Almighty and merciful God, may no earthly undertaking hinder those who set out in haste to meet your Son, but may our learning of heavenly wisdom gain us admittance to his company.”  This Collect contrasts earthly undertaking with learning of heavenly wisdom, as if learning heavenly wisdom at Mass were not an earthly undertaking.  Who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever [forever is one word] and ever.

 

Revised:  Almighty and merciful God, may no earthly undertaking hinder those who set out in haste to meet your Son.  Grant that we may join that number, seeking your Son, our Lord, Jesus Christ.  Enable us to learn heavenly wisdom whereby to gain admittance to his company.  Your Son, Jesus, lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, forever and ever.

 

Comment:  This is a fused sentence,[4] despite the fact that the two main clauses are linked with a coordinating conjunction and a comma, namely “, but.”[5]  The main clauses have different direct objects, undertaking in the first clause and learning in the second.  Undertaking and learning make a poor contrast.  To improve the contrast, pray, “Almighty and merciful God, may no earthly undertaking hinder those who set out in haste to meet your Son.  Grant that we may join that number, seeking your Son, our Lord, Jesus Christ.  Enable us to learn heavenly wisdom whereby to gain admittance to his company.”

The Collect continues with a sentence fragment.  “Who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever [forever is one word] and ever.”  The Little, Brown Handbook first notes that who is a relative pronoun, which identifies a subordinate clause.  The Little, Brown Handbook continues, “Subordinate clauses serve as parts of sentences (as nouns or modifiers), not as whole sentences…”[6]  To improve the sentence fragment, pray, “Your Son, Jesus, lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, forever and ever.”

 

Prayer after Communion

 

 

Prayer after Communion from the Missal:  “Replenished by the food of spiritual nourishment (1), we humbly beseech you (2), O Lord, that, through our partaking in this mystery (3), you may teach us to judge wisely the things of earth and hold firm to the things of heaven.  Through Christ our Lord.

 

Revised:  O Lord we praise you for replenishing us to go forth from this place again replenished by spiritual nourishment from your Eucharistic food.  Your presence among us is a mystery in which we partake.  Through this grace, teach us to judge wisely the things of earth and to hold firmly to the things of heaven above.  We ask this through Christ, our Lord and God.

 

Comment:  The three commas indicate that this is a fused sentence.[7]  The phrase between the first two commas is a sentence within a sentence.  The conjunction, and, requires parallel construction.  The Little Brown Handbook instructs, “The coordinating conjunctions and, but, or, not, and yet always signal a need for parallelism.[8]  In the Missal, to judge wisely is not in parallel construction with hold firm to.

 



[1] n.a., The Roman Missal:  Renewed by Decree of the Most Holy Second Ecumenical Council of the Vatican, Promulgated by Authority of Pope Paul VI and Revised at the Direction of Pope John Paul II:  English Translation According to the Third Typical Edition:  For Use in the Dioceses of the United States of America:  Approved by the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops and Confirmed by the Apostolic See (Washington, DC, United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, 2011).

 

[2] n.a., The Roman Missal:  Renewed by Decree of the Most Holy Second Ecumenical Council of the Vatican, Promulgated by Authority of Pope Paul VI and Revised at the Direction of Pope John Paul II:  English Translation According to the Third Typical Edition:  For Use in the Dioceses of the United States of America:  Approved by the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops and Confirmed by the Apostolic See (Washington, DC, United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, 2011).

 

[3] http://www.google.com/search?q=faith+seeking+understanding&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&aq=t&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&client=firefox-a  (accessed November 28, 2011) and http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/anselm/ (accessed November 28, 2011).

 

[4] See Chapter 18, “Comma Splices, Fused Sentences,” H. Ramsey Fowler and Jane E. Aaron, Eleventh Edition:  The Little, Brown Handbook (New York:  Longman, 2010) 339-444.

 

[5] See Part 6, “Punctuation,” Chapter 28 e, “Comma: Phrases of contrast,” H. Ramsey Fowler and Jane E. Aaron, Eleventh Edition:  The Little, Brown Handbook (New York:  Longman, 2010) 432-433.

 

[6] H. Ramsey Fowler and Jane E. Aaron, Eleventh Edition:  The Little, Brown Handbook (New York:  Longman, 2010) 332.

 

[7] See Chapter 18, “Comma Splices, Fused Sentences,” H. Ramsey Fowler and Jane E. Aaron, Eleventh Edition:  The Little, Brown Handbook (New York:  Longman, 2010) 339-444.

 

[8] H. Ramsey Fowler and Jane E. Aaron, Eleventh Edition:  The Little, Brown Handbook (New York:  Longman, 2010) 399.